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PinSBURGH THEOLOGiCAL 
SEMINARY LIBRARY 



Digitized by tine Internet Archive 

in 2011 witii funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualcatalogue194550pitt 




/ 



THE 

PITTSBURGH-XENIA 

THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 




FOUNDED 1794 



v 



ANNUAL CATALOGUE 
1945*1946 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 
1946-2947 



/ 



n 

n 



THE 
ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

OF THE 

Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Theological Seminary 

OF 

THE UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 
OF NORTH AMERICA 

616 West North Avenue 
PITTSBURGH 12, PA. 

1945-1946 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

FOR THE YEAR 

1946-1947 



THE SEMINARY CALENDAR 
1946 

21 May - 6 Sept. Summer Session for Seniors 



Fall Term 

17 Sept. Registration of new students, 9:00 A.M. — 4-: 00 P.M. 

Assignment of rooms, 4:00 P.M. 

18 Sept. Registration of all regular Middlers and Seniors 

9:00 A.M.— 1:00 P.M. 

18 Sept. Formal Opening of the Session 

Opening Address in Pressly Chapel, 2:00 P.M. 
Reception to new students, 3:00 P.M. 

19 Sept. Class work begins, 8:00 A.M. 

20 Sept. Seminary Communion Service, 7:00 P.M. 

Sacramental Address by the Rev. James H. Blackwood 

21 Nov. Thanksgiving Day 

4 Dec. Last Day of the Fall Term 



Winter Term 
5 Dec. Class work begins, 8:30 A.M. 
/A j^Dec. Christmas Vacation begins, after regular class hours 

1947 



«/Z Jan. Class work resumes, 8:30 A.M. 
' 12 Feb. Day of Prayer for Colleges and 



Day of Prayer for Colleges and Seminaries 
Address by the Rev. Robert N. Montgomery, D.D. 
1 Mar. Last Day of the Winter Term 



Spring Term 
4 Mar. Class work begins, 8:30 A.M. 
3 Apr. Easter Recess begins, after regular class hours 
8 Apr. Class ivork resumes, 8:30 A.M. 
11 May Baccalaureate Service, 11:00 A.M. 

The Mt. Lebanon Church, Pittsburgh 
Sermon by Professor Addison H. Leitch 
11 May Senior Communion Service, 4:00 P.M. 
The Pressly Chapel 
Professor James L, Kelso officiating 
14 May Annual Meeting of the Board of Directors, 2:00 P.M. 

14 May Sefiior Reception, — the Board of Directors, 7:00 P.M. 

15 May Annual Meeting of the Alumni Association, 4:00 P.M. 

The First Church, North Side, Pittsburgh 
15 May Alumni Diriner, 5:30 P.M. 
15 May Graduating Exercises, 8:00 P.M. 

The First Church, North Side, Pittsburgh 



• CALENDAR FOR 1946 • 


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The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



THE CONTROL AND MANAGEMENT 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary is the result of a 
union of the Pittsburgh and Xenia Seminaries consummated in 
1930. According to its proper ancestry the Xenia Seminary was 
founded in 1794 by the Associate Presbyterian Church. The 
Pittsburgh Seminary was founded in 1825 under the auspices of 
the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church. The Seminary as 
now established is under the immediate control of the American 
Synods of the United Presbyterian Church and the ultimate review 
control of the General Assembly. Its management Is committed to 
a Board of Directors and Trustees. The Board of Directors consists 
of thirty-five members, ministers or ruling elders, who are nom- 
inated by the several Synods to the General Assembly for elec- 
tion on the basis of each Synod having one representative for 
every five thousand church members or a major fraction thereof. 
Each Synod has at least one representative. The Board of 
Directors has the general government of the Seminary, subject 
to the authority of the Synods and the General Assembly, appoints 
the Trustees, and provides for the financial maintenance of the 
institution. The Board of Trustees consists of twelve members. 
It is the corporate body which holds and manages the real estate 
and the funds of the Seminary. The term and the course of 
study are determined by the General Assembly. 



STANDING OF THE SEMINARY 

The Seminary is an accredited member of the American 
Association of Theological Schools, and has had this standing 
from the time of the adoption of the Association's accrediting 
system in 1938. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



Synod of New York 

The Rev. J. Kenneth Miller, M.A. . . 

The Rev. Roy E. Grace, Th.M. 

The Rev. James M, Guthrie .... 

The Rev. J. M. Findley Brown, D.D. 

The Rev. Claire E. Hawthorne, D.D. 

Synod of Pittsburgh 

The Rev. A. R. Robinson, D.D., LL.D. . 

Mr. Frank H. Davis 

The Rev. James T. Vorhis, D.D. 
The Rev. H. H. McConnell, D.D. 
The Rev. John L. McGeoch, D.D. 

The Rev. R. W. Gibson, D.D 

The Rev. W. J. McMichael, D.D. 

Mr. J. S.Mason 





Term 


Expires 


Garden City, N. Y. 


1946 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


1947 


Oneonta, N. Y. 


1947 


. Walton, N. Y. 


1948 


Tacoma Park, Md. 


1948 


. Pittsburgh, Pa. 


1946 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


1946 


CoraopoHs, Pa. 


1947 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


1947 


Unity, Pa. 


1947 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


1948 


Greensburg, Pa. 


1948 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


1948 



First Synod of the West 



The Rev. J. M. Ferguson, D.D. 
The Rev. S. E. Irvine, D.D. 
The Rev. Don P. Montgomery, D.D. 
The Rev. Walker S. Brownlee 
The Rev. S. C. Gamble, D.D. 
The Rev. W. B. McFarland 
The Rev. J. Ralph Neale, D.D. 
The Rev. Wm. F. Rotzler, D.D. 
Mr. Albert B. McClester 



Pittsburgh, Pa. 1946 

New Castle, Pa. 1946 

Youngstown, Ohio 1946 

Hamburg, N. Y. 1947 

. Butler, Pa. 1947 

Sheakleyville, Pa. 1947 

New Wilmington, Pa. 1948 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 1948 

Butler, Pa. 1948 



Synod of Ohio 

The Rev. George U. Martin, Th.M., D.D. . 
The Rev. R. P. MacDonald 
The Rev. Leland M. Miller 



Detroit, Michigan 1946 

St. Clairsville, Ohio 1947 

Cambridge, Ohio 1948 



Second Synod 

The Rev. R. A. Jamieson, D.D. 
The Rev. Leslie Mountford, D.D. 



Cedarville, Ohio 1948 
Columbus, Ohio 1948 



Synod of Illinois 



The Rev. J. P. Lytle, D.D. 
The Rev. J. E. Simpson, D.D. 



Milwaukee, Wis. 1948 
Oak Park, 111. 1948 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 9 

Synod of Iowa r ^• 

' Expires 

The Rev. J. A. Thompson, D.D., LL.D Tarklo, Mo. 1946 

The Rev. R. A. Foster Keokuk, Iowa 1948 

Synod of Kansas 

The Rev. James L. Cottrell Tulsa, Okla. 1948 

Synod of Nebraska 

The Rev. Roy P. Morris . . . Colorado Springs, Colo. 1948 

Synod of California 

The Rev. Paul E. Carson, D.D. ... Los Angeles, Calif. 1948 

Synod of die Columbia 

The Rev. E. D. McKune Nampa, Idaho 1947 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

The Rev. George U. Martin, Th.M., D.D., President 
The Rev. J. Kenneth Miller, M.A., Vice President 
The Rev. Robert W. Gibson, D.D., Secretary 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

The Executive Committee 

The Rev. W. F. Rotzler, D.D., Chairman 

The Rev. R. W. Gibson, D.D. 

The Rev. J. Ralph Neale, D.D. 

The Rev. A. R. Robinson, D.D., LL.D. 

The Rev. W. J. McMichael, D.D. 

Mr. Frank H. Davis 

Mr. Albert B. McClester 

The Committee on Beneficiary Funds 

The Seminary Faculty 



HONORARY DIRECTORS 

The Rev. T. M. Huston, D.D. 
Mr. Robert L. Latimer 
The Rev. J. Walter Liggitt, D.D. 
The Rev. W. E. McCulloch, D.D. 
The Rev. T. N. McQuoid, D.D. 
The Rev. W. L. C. Samson, D.D. 
The Rev. J. A. Thompson, D.D., LL.D. 
The Rev. C. H. Watson, D.D., LL.D. 



10 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES Term 

Expires 

The Rev. A. R. Robinson, D.D., LL.D. . . . Pittsburgh, Pa. 1946 

The Rev. Charles W. Fulton, D.D. . . . Pittsburgh, Pa. 1946 

Mr. Frank H. Davis Pittsburgh, Pa. 1946 

Mr. J. S. Miller Pittsburgh, Pa. 1946 

The Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D. . . . Pittsburgh, Pa. 1947 

Robert Fisher, Esq Indiana, Pa. 1947 

Mr. T. J. Gillespie, Jr Pittsburgh, Pa. 1947 

J. M. Lashly, Esq., LL.D St. Louis, Mo. 1947 

The Hon. W. H. McNaugher .• . . . Pittsburgh, Pa. 1948 

Mr. Joseph A. Dickey Pittsburgh, Pa. 1948 

Mr. J. Smith Miller Pittsburgh, Pa. 1948 

George M. Swan, Esq Pittsburgh, Pa. 1948 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

The Rev. A. R. Robinson, D.D., LL.D., President 
Mr. M. J. Hein, Secretary and Treasurer 



STANDING COMMITTEES 
The Committee on Finance 

The Rev. A. R. Robinson, D.D., LL.D., Chairman 
Mr. T. J. Gillespie, Jr. 
Mv.. Frank H. Davis 

The Committee on Seminary Premises 

Mr. Frank H. Davis, Chairman 
The Rev. Charles W. Fulton, D.D. 

The Purchasing Committee 

Mr. Joseph A. Dickey, Chairman 
The Rev. George A. Long, D.D, 



DORMITORY COMMITTEE 

A4rs. Robert P. Rhodes, Chairman 

Miss Eleanor Gillespie 

Miss Alice Gray 

Mrs. J. L. Kelso 

Mrs. W. H. Ochiltree 

Mrs. Chalmers T. Siviter 

Mrs. a. H. Trimble 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary U 



THE FACULTY 



/ The Rev. George Anderson Long, D.D., President 
Professor of English Bible 

7135 Reynolds Street, Pittsburgh 8, Pa. 

1. The Rev. Robert McNary Karr, D.D., Registrar 
Professor of Systematic and Biblical Theology 

236 Hllands Avenue, Ben Avon, Pittsburgh 2, Pa. 

P The Rev. James Leon Kelso, Th.D., D.D. 

Professor of Semltics and Biblical Archaeology 

129 Altadena Drive, Mt. Lebanon, Pittsburgh 16, Pa. 

The Rev. George Boone McCreary, Ph.D., D.D., Secretary 
Professor of Philosophy of Religion and Religious Education 
206 Ridge Avenue, Ben Avon, Pittsburgh 2, Pa. 

i The Rev. Albert Henry Baldinger, D.D. 
Professor of Practical Theology 

41 Penshurst Road, Ben Avon Heights, Pittsburgh 2, Pa. 

^ The Rev. Clarence Joseph Williamson, D.D. 

Professor of Church History and Government 
5909 Hampton Street, Pittsburgh 6, Pa. 

^ The Rev. Theophilus Mills Taylor, D.D. 

Professor, the John McNaugher Chair 

of New Testament Literature and Exegesis 

1009 Norwood Avenue, Ben Avon Heights, Pittsburgh 2, Pa. 

7 The Rev. Addison Hardie Leitch, Ph.D., D.D. 

Professor elect, Philosophy of Religion and Religious Education 
Grove City, Pa. 

; Professor Albert Thornton Cordray, Ph.D. 
Instructor In Public Speaking 
New Wilmington, Pa. 



EMERITUS PROFESSORS 

The Rev. John McNaugher, D.D., LL.D., Litt.D., President Emeritus 
Emeritus Professor of New Testament Literature and Exegesis 
321 Lafayette Avenue, Pittsburgh 14, Pa. 

The Rev. Jesse Johnson, D.D., LL.D. 
Emeritus Professor of Church History 
Reynoldsburg, Ohio 

The Rev. William Riley Wilson, D.D., LL.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Pastoral Theology and Homiletlcs 
328 Dalzell Avenue, Ben Avon, Pittsburgh 2, Pa. 

The Rev. James Doig Rankin, D.D., LL.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Systematic and Biblical Theology 
715 South El Molino Avenue, Pasadena, Calif. 



12 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



OFFICERS OF THE FACULTY 



The Rev. George Anderson Long, D.D. 
President 

The Rev. Robert M, Karr, D.D. 
Registrar 

The Rev. George Boone McCreary, Ph.D., D.D. 
Secretary 



COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

The Credentials Committee 

Dr. Karr Dr. Leitch Dr. McCreary 

The Curriculum Committee 
Dr. Baldinger Dr. Kelso Dr. Karr 

The Library Committee 

Dr. Taylor Dr. Leitch Dr. McCreary 

The Devotional Committee 

Dr. Williamson Dr. Baldinger 

The Committee on Field Work and Placement 

Dr. Baldinger Dr. McCreary Dr. Williamson 

The Press Committee 

Dr. Kelso Dr. Williamson 

The Catalogue Committee 

Dr. Karr Dr. Baldinger 

Graduate Studies Committee 

Dr. Taylor Dr. McCreary Dr. Kelso 



Miss Ruth Christy, A.B. 
Secretary to the President 

Miss Margaret E. Orr, A.B. 
Librarian 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 13 



THE PURPOSE OF THE SEMINARY 



The purpose of the Seminary, as defined in the Constitution, 
is to instruct candidates for the gospel ministry, ordained ministers 
of the gospel, and such as may be preparing for other special lines 
of Christian service, in the knowledge of the doctrines of the 
Scriptures and the order and institutes of worship taught therein 
and summarily exhibited in the standards of the United Presbyte- 
rian Church of North America; to cherish in them the life of 
true godliness, and to cultivate the gifts which Christ, the Head 
of the Church, confers on those whom He calls and ordains to the 
ministry, to the end that there may be raised up a succession of 
able, faithful, and godly ministers of the gospel and of other 
Christian workers. 



THE TERM AND COURSE OF STUDY 



The regular course of seminary training prescribed by the 
General Assembly covers a period of three academic years, each of 
which is divided into three terms. The annual session begins the 
third Wednesday of September, and continues thirty-four weeks 
including holidays. 

The Seminary course is built for college graduates, and 
presupposes a foundation of broad and liberal culture. In 
preparation for their professional training in the Seminary, college 
students should take substantial courses in the subjects indicated 
in the following recommended Pre-Seminary Studies. 



14 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



PRE-SEMINARY STUDIES 

The American Association of Theological Schools, at its 
twelfth biennial meeting, Lexington, Ky., June, 1940, adopted a 
Statement regarding Pre-Seminary Studies and authorized it to be 
sent to all colleges and universities in the United States and 
Canada. The statement includes the following specifications as to 
the proper fields of study, and the minimum number of semester 
hours: 

Semester 
Fields Hours 

English (Composition and Literature) 8' 12 

Philosophy (At least two of the following: Introduction to philosophy. 
History of philosophy, Ethics, Logic) 4'6 

A foreign language (At least one of the following: Latin, Greek, 
Hebrew, French, German) 1246 

Natural sciences (Physical or biological) .— 4'6 

Social sciences (At least two of the following: Economics, Sociology, 
Government or political science, Social psychology, Education) 4'6 

Concentration of work or 'majoring', is a common practice in colleges. For 
such concentration or major, a constructive sequence based upon any one, 
two, or three of the above fields of study would lead up naturally to a 
theological course. 

With the addition of a substantial course in Speech, and of 
12-16 semester hours in Elementary Greek, the Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Seminary has endorsed the foregoing Statement of Pre-Seminary 
Studies, and urges all college students who are looking forward 
to the Gospel ministry to make use of this Statement in the 
shaping of their college course (in consultation with their advisors 
at college), so that they may not only secure the desired college 
degree but at the same time secure the best possible preparation 
for seminary work. 

The Statement of Pre-Seminary Studies does not purport to 
be in itself a complete four-year college course, but rather calls 
attention to those fields and courses of study which are accessible 
to all college students and which are of basic importance in 
preparation for seminary training. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 15 

The Statement is not yet mandatory, but it indicates the 
trend in seminary circles. The Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary will 
use this Pre-Seminary Statement of Studies as a standard by 
which to judge the preparedness of applicants for admission. 

Those who have notable deficiencies, especially in Greek, 
will be required to remove them. All new registrants will be re- 
quired to take a placement examination in New Testament Greek, 
regardless of the amount of collegiate Greek credits presented for 
entrance. Those failing to pass the examination will be placed in 
appropriate classes in Elementary Greek, which are offered for 
the convenience of those who arc totally or partially deficient in 
Greek. Adequate preparation is prerequisite to New Testament 
Exegesis: Elementary Greek is therefore not credited toward the 
Seminary diploma. 

PRE-THEOLOGICAL MAJOR 

Students in Colleges of Agriculture, who have it in mind to 
prepare for ministering to rural churches, may not find it entirely 
practicable to follow the Pre-Seminary Studies outlined above. 
In such case, and with a view to the most effective rural ministry, 
we recommend that in their college days they follow the Pre- 
Theological Major suggested by the Conference on Relation- 
ships between Colleges of Agriculture and Theological Seminaries, 
held at Purdue University, Nov. 6, 1940. The suggested Pre- 
Theological Major is as follows: 

"At least one basic course (three semester hours) in each of the following 
fields: 

Agricultural Economics 

Economics 

English Composition, 2 courses (6 semester hours) 

English Literature (preferably 2 courses) 

History or Government (preferably 2 courses) 

Philosophy 

Public Speaking 

Psychology 

Rural Sociology 

Sociology 

"In addition the student would fulfill the minimum requirements of the 
College of Agriculture, which include Science (usually Biology and Chemistry). 

"Recommended Electives : 
Education 
Foreign Language 

"Undergraduate courses in religion are not required in the suggested major, 
as these cannot be offered in state-supported institutions." 



^^4 



x^ vl si' vi ^V 



16 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 







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. ^> v^ %j vf^.^-M 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



17 



ELECTIVE COURSES 

The following Elective Courses are available to qualified undergraduarK 
(ordinarily Middlers and Seniors), and also to students in the Graduate Departme^w, 
who may apply them toward their degree in the fields indicated. (See page 3fF^ 



Course 



Quarter 
Hours 



te«^) 



150. 0. T. Canon and Text (given with No. 250) V/2 
>151,*:^2: Hebrew Exegesis . . (es^) 3 

153. Hebrew Critical . . . . .3 

155. - Geafii - nphy of Dibk La« ds<^-^^ ' ^ 4^***err3 

157. Archaeology of Palestine 

158. Seminar in Archaeology 
160. Current Trends in O. T. Criticism 
250. N. T. Canon and Textual Criticism 

253. Greek Critical .... 

254. Readings in the Koine Papyri 
255,-314* Exegetical Seminars' 

260. The Church and Its Art ... . 

261. Critical Introd. to the Pauline Epistles 
V262. Recent Developments in Synoptic Criticism 
., 263. Critical Introd. to the Johannine Writings 

• 350. The Parables of Jesus 

450. Comparative Religion 

451. The Early American Church 
M53. American Church Biography 

454. History of Doctrine 

455. Bible Characters 

550. Doctrinal Thesis 

551. The Teaching of Jesus 
558. The Means of Grace 
560. The Doctrine of Last Things 

651. Psychology of Religion 

652. Organization and Admin. In Educa. Programs 

653. Methods of Religious Teaching 
>654. History of the Philosophy of Religion 

655. Apologetics .... 
v656. Piubluuu iu Modern Christian "MiaBglit 

750. Seminar in Sermon Composition 

751. Preaching Values In the Old Testament 
>752. Preaching in the First Five Centuries 

754. Ezeklel and Daniel «.<.<^- "Rv^ ) . 

851, 85fr Public Speaking . . . (each) 

854. Preparation for Public Speaking 



3 
3 
3 
l'/2 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

3 
3 
3 
1 
3 






21 

US. 










X 
X 
X 

X - 

X 



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18 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



SEMITICS AND BIBLICAL ARCHAEOLOGY 
Dr. Kelso 

The aim of this department is to give the student an appreciation and 
an understanding of the Old Testament. To that end courses are offered (1) 
in the Hebrew language and its peculiar thought techniques, (2) in the Arch' 
aeology of the ancient Near East, (3) in the detailed History of the Hebrew 
people, and (4) in the Old Testament Theology as contrasted with the hea' 
then religions of those days. Seminar courses studying the latest books 
and magazine articles teach the student how he can evaluate and use new 
materials when he gets into the pastorate. An excellent Bible Lands Museum 
serves as a class room in this department. 

Ill, 112, 113. History of the Hebrews. A study of the political and 
religious history of the Hebrew people from the days of Abraham to the 
coming of Christ, with special emphasis on the more significant personali' 
ties, events and institutions. The results of archaeological research are 
studied in conjunction with the Biblical record. The course includes a 
resume of the Persian and Greek periods in Palestine, and a detailed study 
of the Maccabaean and Roman periods, so as to give the student a broad 
background for the New Testament study. The entire course constitutes 
one historical unit, but for convenience is divided into three sections, — 111, 
Abraham to Saul; 112, David to the Destruction of Jerusalem; 113, the Post- 
exilic and Inter-testament periods. 

Juniors, three hours a week throughout the year. 



123. Hebrew Language. A practical course in the Hebrew language 
designed to achieve the following objective: to familiarize the student with a 
working vocabulary of the language and the essential features of its gram- 
mar. A text with lectures and written exercises. 

Middlers, fall term, four hours a week. 

124. Hebrew Reading. A course in the accurate translation and inter- 
pretation of Biblical Hebrew designed to show the wealth of sermonic ma- 
terial in the original Hebrew. Selected Psalms and historical passages. 

Middlers, winter and spring terms, three hours a week. 

132. Old Testament Theology. A detailed study of the major doctrines 
of the Old Testament, with a quick survey of the historical progress of 
Revelation in the light of contemporary civilizations and religions. 

Seniors, fall term, three hours a week. 



150. Old Testament Canon and Text. History of the formation of the 
Hebrew Canon, with emphasis upon the rejection of the Apocrypha. A 
brief history of the Hebrew text and the major versions. 

Elective, one and one-half quarter hours. (Given with No. 250). 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 19 



151, 152. Hebrew Exegesis. Practice in acquiring the principles of Old 
Testament exegesis, not only from the linguistic field, but also from the 
archaeological source material. The more difficult Hebrew passages with 
rich sermonic possibilities are used. 

Elective, Seniors, three quarter hours credit for each course. 

153. Hebrew Critical. In order to enable the students to meet the 
requirements of their respective presbyteries in connection with ordination, 
provision is made for each Senior to present a critical paper on the Hebrew 
text of an assigned passage from the Old Testament. There will be individ' 
ual conferences by appointment for reports of progress, during the first 
week of each month of the term. Papers will be due on the last day pre 
ceding examinations. 

Elective, Seniors, fall or winter, three quarter hours credit. 

155. Geography of Bible Lands. A survey course covering the major 
features of all ancient geography which influenced Biblical history, and a 
detailed study of Palestinian geography and its relation to Old Testament 
history and the customs and manners of its peoples. 

Elective, three quarter hours. 

157. Archaeology of Palestine. A rapid historical survey of archaeological 
work in Bible lands, with particular attention to the cultural and religious 
life of the Israelite and non'Israelite populations in Palestine. Methods of 
archaeological research and the interpretation of findings are studied, not 
only for apologetic purposes, but especially for the exegetical study of the 
Scriptures. Assigned readings, slides and materials from the Bible lands 
museum. 

Elective, three quarter hours. 

158. Seminar in Archaeology. The period of the Exodus and Conquest. 
A research course in which the student becomes acquainted not only with all 
available historical and archaeological source materials, but also with the 
proper methods of presenting his conclusions in such a fashion that they 
will be helpful to the average church member. 

Elective, three quarter hours. 

160. Current Trends in Old Testament Criticism. A course designed to 
train students in the evaluation of new books and technical magazine articles 
in all fields of Old Testament research. 

Elective, three quarter hours. 



20 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



./>■' 



NEW TESTAMENT LITERATURE AND EXEGESIS 
Dr. Taylor 

The work in this department is centered in the history, Hterature and 
interpretation of our Primary Source, the New Testament. The aim through' 
out is to impress upon the student the uniqueness of Christianity and its 
Textbook; and to make the study of the New Testament both inspirational 
and practical, looking toward the future pastoral and homiletical work of 
the student. Each student is expected to read, at one sitting, each of the 
New Testament books in its entirety during the period when it is under class' 
room consideration. These readings will follow the text of the Revised 
Standard Version. Repeated readings are advised. The Greek text of 
Westcott and Hort is used in all critical and exegetical work. (Except as 
otherwise indicated, courses are given by the professor in charge). 

211. Elementary Greek. New students who are not properly qualified for 
work in New Testament Exegesis are required to study the elements of the 
Greek language. A suitable text is used, and special attention is given to 
vocabulary, verbal forms and syntax. 

Juniors (J*), fall term, three hours a week. (No credit. See p. 16). 

212. Elementary Greek. (PreTequisite 211.) Portions of the Gospel ac' 
cording to John and of the Catholic Epistles are read critically in the Greek 
with the aid of Green's Grammar. 

Juniors (J^), wifiter and spring, three hours a week. (No credit. See p. 16). 

213. Greek Reading. Readings in the Koine Greek of the New Testa' 

ment, the Septuagint, or the Papyri, will be offered according to the needs 
and abihties of the students, and with the approval of the department. (Credit 
given, but not applicable on two semesters required Exegesis). 
Juniors (J^), fall term, three hours a week. Dr. Leitch. 

214. Greek Reading. A continuation of course No. 213. (Credit given, 
but not applicable on two semesters required Exegesis). 

Juniors (J^), winter term, three hours a week. Dr. Leitch. 

215. Biblical Hermeneutics. (a) Hermeneutics proper: A review of the 
history of interpretation in the Church, and a determination of the principles 
of sound exegesis as exemplified in the grammatico'historical method. Lectures 
and discussion, (b) The Oriental Mind: Jesus was an Oriental Who min' 
istered and preached to Orientals. Any honest interpretation of Scripture 
demands an understanding of Oriental, and particularly Semitic, psychology. 
A study is made of it, using the Scriptures and contemporaneous literature, 
together with experiences from modern Oriental life, for documentation. 
Lectures, readings and discussion. 

Juniors, fall term, three hours a week. 

221. New Testament Introduction, (a) New Testament World: The his' 
torical setting in which the New Testament appeared, — old Greek religion, 
later Hellenistic mystery religions, HellenistiC'Judaism and the Jewish sects. 
(b) The Gospels and Acts: Introduction and survey. Synoptic and Johan' 
nine problems, Luke'Acts and apostolic history. Textbook, lectures and 
required readings. 

Middlers, fall term, three hours a week. 

222. New Testament Introduction, (a) Pauline Epistles: Historical, lit' 
erary and critical study with a survey of the text, (b) General Epistles: 
Introduction and survey. (c) Apocalypse: Introduction and survey. A 
sympathetic review of the various schools of interpretation. 

Middlers, winter term, three hours a week. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 21 



241. New Testament Greek Exegesis. Epistle to the Romans: A re Vj 
view of the principles of Hermeneutics, followed by a critical study of the 
Greek text in application of these principles. The first few chapters are 

dealt with illustratively by lectures, followed by a general class assignment, 
the remainder of the term being given over to individual assignments. ' 
Lectures, collateral readings, reports and discussions. 

Middlers and quaHfied Juniors, winter term, three hours a week. 

242. New Testament Greek Exegesis. Epistle to the Hebrews: Contin' < 
uation of the report and discussion method. (See Course No. 241 above), 

Middlers and quaHfied Juniors, spring term, three hours a week. 

250. New Testament Canon and Textual Criticism, (a) The Canon: A 
study of the formation of the New Testament. The limiting principle of 
the Canon and the consequent rejection of apocryphal and pseudepigraph' 
ical works. The position of the Roman Church, of the Church of 
England, and of the Presbyterian and Reformed bodies as shown in the West' 
minster Confession. Lectures and required readings. (b) Textual Criti' 
cism: A survey of the history of the printed text, with an introduction to 
the apparatus criticus and the principles of textual criticism. An appraisal 
of the Tischendorf, Nestle, and Westcott and Hort texts. Textbook, 
lectures and required readings. 

Elective, one and onchalf quarter hours. (Given with No. 150). 

253. Greek Critical. In order to enable the students to meet the re' 
quirements of their respective presbyteries in connection with ordination, 
provision is made for each senior to present a critical paper on the Greek 
text of an assigned passage from the New Testament. There will be a 
minimum of three individual conferences by appointment, scheduled during 
the term for each registrant. Papers are due on the last Friday before 
the examinations of the term. 

Elective, Seniors, fall or winter, three quarter hours credit. 

254. Readings in the Koine Papyri. An advanced course dealing with 
the nou'literary papyri discovered within recent years. Their bearing upon 
our understanding of New Testament words and phrases. The aim is to 
provide a broader knowledge of First Century thought for a fuller and more 
accurate interpretation of the New Testament. 

Elective, for advanced students, three quarter hours. 

255. Exegetical Seminar. For tne advanced GreeL^tudent especially 
interested in Exegesis. A choice of research problem^Tispe'rmitted each 
student. Reports for round'table discussion. A summary written paper is 
presented in lieu of a final examination. 

Elective, Seniors and qualified Middlers, three quarter hours. 

256., Exegetical ''SeminafT Similar to Course No. 255 above. ' ^^„y^' 
^piective. Seniors and qualified Middlers, three quarter hours. 

260. The Church and Its Art. (a) The Origin and Development of the 
Church Edifice, traced through the various architectural periods from the 
diaspora synagogues to the present, showing the different lines of influence. 
A discussion of architectural styles adaptable and suitable to the requirements 
of the American Church today. Illustrated lectures, readings and discussions. 
(b) Christian Art and Symbolism: A survey of Christian graphic and plastic 
art through the centuries. The importance of symbolism to the early Chris' 
tians, and its place in the Church's art today. Illustrated lectures, readings 
and discussions. 

Elective, three quarter hours. 



22 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



261. Critical Introduction to the Pauline Epistles. A rapid survey of 
Paul's life on the basis of a synthesis of the records in Acts and the Epistles. 
The origin and completion of the Corpus Paulinum. The groupings of 
the ten major epistles. Recent criticism of the authorship of 11 Thess., Col., 
Eph., and of the place of origin of the captivity correspondence. The prob' 
lems of Romans 16, and of the Pastorals. Sacramentalism, and other 
mystery features in Pauline theology. 

Elective, for advanced students, three quarter hours. 

262. Recent Developments in Synoptic Criticism. An introduction to 
formgeschichte, with a critical appraisal of its strong points and weaknesses, 
its possibilities and dangers. The possible ^srmanent values which it may 
contribute in the field of New Testament study. 

Elective, for advanced students, three quarter hours. 

263. Critical Introduction to the Johannine Writings. An appraisal of 
recent criticism as to the unity of the Fourth Gospel and the so-called 
epistles, and as to the relationship of the Apocalypse to the Johannine group, 
dealing with the differences in grammar, vocabulary and thought-concepts. 
The Apocalypse in the field of apocalyptics. Antagonism toward it among 
the early Fathers and among the Reformers. 

Elective, for advanced students, three quarter hours. 



264. (4>s-^orv a^ ^tKe CK>'.t>i^ty.K^. |_f(Tfr^«^ 



a.io'S 



l^cteATtiv .w»(iS»-<^4M-oJ-t %fu.a<j4's oi^Uf) 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 23 

ENGLISH BIBLE 
Dr. Long 



It is the aim of this department to provide, in close co'Operation with 
other departments, a careful study of the content of the English Bible. 
Courses are designed so that, in connection with the Old Testament and New 
Testament departments, opportunity is given to the student to study, either 
in the original language or in English, every book of the Bible, with a view 
to securing not only a knowledge of the authorship, critical questions and 
historical background, but also a knowledge of the Scripture itself. 



311. The Gospels. There will be literary and historical study of the 
Gospels, covering their general features, a survey of their content and the 
relation of the Synoptics to the Fourth Gospel. Critical questions in con- 
nection with the Gospels will be studied in Course No. 221. 

Juniors, winter term, three hours a week. 



312. The Life of Christ. The life of Christ will be studied on the basis 
of the materials contained in the Gospels, — His birth, baptism, temptation, 
self'consciousness, teachings, miraculous activity, crucifixion, resurrection 
and ascension. 

Juniors, spring term, three hours a week. 



322. The Poetical Books. This course is designed to provide (a) a general 
introduction to the poetry and wisdom writings of the ancient Hebrews; (b) 
a comprehensive survey of the Psalter; and (c) an analysis of Job, Eccle- 
siastes and the Song of Songs. 

Middlers, fall term, three hours a week. 



331. The Eighth Century Prophets. There will be (a) a general survey 
of prophetism in Israel, its origin and development from earliest times to the 
time of the canonical prophets; (b) historical introduction to the Prophets 
of the Eighth Century, B.C.; and (c) a detailed study of Amos, Hosea, 
Micah and Isaiah. Attention will be given to the social ethics of these 
prophecies and their bearings on contemporary life. 

Seniors, winter term, three hours a week. 



332. The Later Prophets. The course includes a study of the historical 
introduction to and the contents of the writings of the prophets who ap' 
peared in the critical years of the late seventh century B.C., and in the re' 
construction period following the exile. Attention will be given to the un- 
usual literary features; exegetical studies of outstanding passages; and the 
permanent values of the teachings of these prophets. 

Seniors, spring term, three hours a week. 



24 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



350. The Parables of Jesus. A careful study of the incomparable para- 
bles of our Lord, which occupied so large a place in His teaching. Attention 
will be given to their meaning for our Lord's hearers, and to their teaching 
for our own day. Homiletic values will be thoroughly reviewed. 

Elective, three quarter hours. 



Courses in English Bible in other departments. 

Ill, 112, 113. History of the Hebrews. 

Juniors, three hours a week throughout the year. Dr. Kelso 

221, 222. New Testament Introduction. 

Middlers, three quarter hours for each course. Dr. Taylor 

455. Bible Characters. 

Elective, three quarter hours. Dr. Williamson 

551. The Teaching of Jesus. 

Elective, three quarter hours. Dr. Karr 

751. Preaching Values in the Old Testament. 

Elective, three quarter hours. Dr. Baldinger 

754. Ezekiel and Daniel. 

Elective, three quarter hours. Dr. Baldinger 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 25 

CHURCH HISTORY 
Dr. Williamson 



411. Church History, Apostolic and Ancient. From the apostolic age 
to the barbarian invasions. The Council of Jerusalem; the early Church, the 
conflicts with heathenism and heresy, doctrinal controversies; the growth of 
ritual and discipline; great church leaders. 

Juniors, fall term, three hours a week. 



412. Mediaeval Church History. Barbarian invasions; growth in influ' 
ence of the papacy; Mohammedanism; the Holy Roman Empire; the Crusades; 
monastic orders; universities; Scholasticism; Mysticism; the Renaissance. 

Juniors, winter term, three hours a week. 



422. Modern Church History. The Reformation in different countries; 
the Counter'Reformation; the Puritans; the Pietists; American churches and 
their European antecedents, their origins, leaders and influence. 

Juniors, spring term, four hours a week. 



431. Religious Movements in America. Revivalism; anti'Christian cults: 
Christian Science, Russellism, Mormonism, Spiritualism, etc. The Group 
movements. Great American preachers. 

Seniors, spring term, three hours a week. 



432. Christian Missions. A survey of the progress of missions from the 
Apostolic days, with special emphasis on the modern missionary movement, 
beginning with William Carey. An examination of the principal mission 
fields, including those of the United Presbyterian Church. Missions in 
America. Lives of outstanding missionaries in various fields. The problems, 
methods, and opportunities of mission work. Methods of missionary in- 
struction in congregations. 

Seniors, fall term, three hours a week. 



434. Church Government. Discussion method. Principles and forms 
of church government; government and discipline of the United Presbytc 
rian Church; church courts; practical workings of church law. 

Seniors, fall term, one hour a week. 



450. Comparative Religion. An outline of the history, beliefs, literature 
and practices of the non'Christian religions, with special emphasis on Moham- 
medanism, Hinduism, and Buddhism. Elements of strength and of weakness 
in non'Christian faiths. Complete superiority of the Christian religion. 

Elective, three quarter hours. 



26 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



451. The Early American Church. The European background of the 
American churches. The Puritans and Pilgrims. Persecution of Quakers, 
Baptists, etc. Roger Williams and religious liberty. Relation of the Church 
to the developing life of the different colonies. Liberal tendencies and re 
ligious diversities. The Great Awakening. The War of the Revolution and 
its effect on religious life. Nationalization of the churches in the United 
States. Missionary work at home and abroad. 

Elective, one quarter hour. 

453. American Church Biography. Lives and contemporary influence of 
outstanding ministers of America from colonial times to the present. Their 
methods and outstanding points of effectiveness. Great Christian laymen in 
different denominations. 

Elective, three quarter hours. 

454. History of Doctrine. Influence of the Greek philosophers on Chris' 
tian thought. Christian apologetics. Development of Christology. History 
of anthropology, soteriology, eschatology, and symbols of the Church. 

Elective, three quarter hours. 

455. Bible Characters. A study of many of the men and women of the 
Bible, some prominent and some obscure; an examination of their charac 
ter and the part they played for or against the plan of God; their inspiration 
or warning for today. 

Elective, three quarter hours. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 27 

SYSTEMATIC AND BIBLICAL THEOLOGY 
Dr. Karr 

The aim of this department is to get the student well grounded in the 
doctrines of our evangeHcal faith. The method includes assigned readings, 
lectures, note-book work and classToom discussion. The subject is taken up in 
the following order, the first few lessons serving the purpose of orientation. 

512. Systematic Theology. (a) Introduction to Theology: the idea, 
purpose and importance of Theology; the source of material; the requisites 
to successful study; preview of the doctrinal system, (b) Revelation: the 
possibility and probability of special Revelation, the claims of Scripture, 
the credibility of the writers, various evidences of the supernatural character 
of the Bible, (c) The Inspiration of the Scriptures, as held by our Church, 
set forth and defended. 

Juniors, spring term, three hours a week. 

521. Systematic Theology, (a) The Doctrine of God: the attributes of 
the Divine Being; the tri'personality of God; the decrees and works of God, 
— creation, preservation and providence, (b) The Doctrine of Angels: their 
nature and employments. 

Middlers', winter term, three hours a week. 

522. Systematic Theology, (a) The Doctrine of Man: the origin and 
primitive state of man; the unity of the human race; essentials of the moral 
and spiritual nature, (b) The Doctrine of Sin: the Fall of man; the nature 
and universality of sin; the consequences of sin to mankind. 

Middlers, spring term, three hours a week. 

531. Systematic Theology, (a) The Doctrine of Christ the Redeemer: 
the preparation for redemption; the person of Christ, His two natures and 
states; the offices and work of Christ, with special study of the Atonement, 
(b) The Doctrine of the Holy Spirit: the application of redemption, — 
election, calling, regeneration, conversion, union with Christ, justification, 
adoption, sanctification. 

Seniors, fall term, three hours a week. 

532. Systematic Theology, (a) The Doctrine of the Church: its na' 
ture, membership, purpose and power; the sacraments of Baptism and the 
Lord's Supper, (b) The Doctrine of Last Things: death, the intermediate 
state, the second coming of Christ, the resurrection, the judgment and final 
awards. 

Seniors, winter term, three hours a week. 

550. Doctrinal Thesis. In order to enable students to meet the require 
ments of their respective presbyteries in connection with ordination, pre 
vision is made for the preparation of a Doctrinal Thesis. This involves 
intensive study in a well'defined field. In determining the subject, the 
student's preference is considered but his choice must have the approval 
of the department. Periodic reports of progress are required. The com' 
pleted manuscript is due on the day preceding term examinations. 

Elective, Middlers, spring term, or Seniors, fall term, three quarter hours 
credit. 



28 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



551. The Teaching of Jesus. A Biblical and inductive study. Source 
material is found in the Gospel record. The aim is to interpret and sys- 
tematize the teaching of the Master, especially concerning Himself. There 
will be class-room lectures, and assigned subjects for inductive study. 

Elective, three quarter hours. 

558. The Means of Grace. A Biblical and practical study. In the light 
of Scripture and experience, the Church and its ordinances, — the Word, 
Sacraments, and Prayer, — are studied with a view to a fresh appraisal of their 
value in nurturing and developing the spiritual Hfe and in furthering Christ's 
cause upon earth. 

Elective, Seniors, three quarter hours. 

559. Trends in Theology. A historical and critical review of the principal 
doctrinal variations which have appeared in the past, with appropriate 
emphasis on developments from the beginning of the nineteenth century. 
In this department, such material is preferably distributed under che various 
doctrinal heads and is used primarily as the historical approach to the study 
of the several main doctrines. Thus each main doctrine serves as the inte- 
grating center, while the historical material furnishes the necessary back' 
ground for the positive presentation and enhances its value. For the more 
particular study of theological systems as systems, and of the present day 
problems growing out of them, the student is referred to Elective Courses, 
No. 454, History of Doctrine, and No. 656, Problems in Modern Christian 
Thought. 

560. The Doctrine of Last Things. A study in Systematic Theology for 
advanced students dealing with physical death, the intermediate state, the 
second coming of Christ, the resurrection of the dead, the final judgment 
and the Kingdom of Glory. 

Elective, Seniors, three quarter hours. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 29 

PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION AND RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

Dr. Leitch 

612. History of Christian Education. A course designed to give back' 
ground for the modern approach to religious education. After a study of 
religious education in Biblical times and in the history of the Christian 
Church, attention is centered on problems within the modern churdh, especi- 
ally as history may throw light on such problems. 

Juniors, spring term, three hours a week. 

631. Philosophy of Religion. An introduction to the major philosophical 
problems as they stand in relation to the claims of the Christian Faith. 
Special attention is given to the problem of the Christian Religion as a 
philosophical system. 

Seniors, fall term, three hours a week. 

651. Psychology of Religion. A study of the principles of psychology as 
related to religious experience. After a brief review of the general field of 
psychology, attention is given to the special psychological problems of re- 
ligion, such as mysticism, conversion, prayer, emotionalism, adolescence, 
worship, etc. Positively, the course aims toward the construction of a ma- 
ture and integrated religious experience. 

Elective, three quarter hours. 

652. Organization and Administration in Educational Programs. A com- 
prehensive study of the principles and methods of educational organi2;ation 
and administration as they may be applied to specific congregational prob- 
lems. Study is made of the daily vacation Bible School, the problem of 
week-day religious education in various public school systems, and the guid- 
ance by the pastor of the church school in his own church. 

Elective, three quarter hours. 

653. Methods of Religious Teaching. Educational methods as applicable 
to church situations. The general educational methods examined critically 
for purposes of use in the special problems of the church sdhool. 

Elective, three quarter hours. 

654. History of the Philosophy of Religion. A study of special value for 
those who have had little or no philosophical training. The history of human 
thought is studied with the special emphasis on those periods when piiilosophy 
touches on religion or when philosophy and religion cross on common issues. 

Elective, three quarter hours. 

655. Apologetics. The development and defense of Christianity, in which 
a survey is made of the old arguments against the Christian faith and the 
classical defenses which have been built up across the centuries. Special inter- 
est centers on the modern apologia for our faith. 

Elective, three quarter hours. 

656. Problems in Modem Christian Thought. The aim of this course is 
to indicate the chief intellectual difficulties which confront the spread of the 
gospel in our day. This course is used as a means for bringing before the 
student the leading thinkers of the day, and their contributions to the criticism 
or establishment of the Christian faith. 

Elective, three quarter hours. 



30 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



PRACTICAL THEOLOGY 

Dr. Baldinger 

711, 712. HomiJetics. Preaching in theory and practice. The source 
material, the organization, the structure and literary style of the sermon. 
The relative advantages of manuscript, memoriter and extemporaneous preach- 
ing. In the practical application of homiletic principles, with, special refer- 
ence to expository preaching, students are required to present for class 
criticism weekly outlines of sermons on assigned texts. 

Juniors, fall and winter terms, three hours a week. 

721. Homiletics. This course is in the nature of homiletic surveys in the 
New Testament. The emphasis is on expository preaching. Paragraphs, 
chapters, and books are examined with a view to discovering their preaching 
values. Special attention is given to the advantages and the possibilities of 
sermon series. Students are required to submit for criticism (a) weekly 
outlines of assigned texts, (b) reports on sermons of representative preachers 
in the several periods of church history, and (c) two fully written sermons 
on texts to be chosen by the students from a designated book of the New 
Testament, (c) manuscripts of two original sermons on themes to be chosen 
by the student from a designated list of New Testament texts. 

Middlers, fall term, three hours a week. 

731. Pastoral Theology. An introductory course dealing with (a) the 
origin, nature, scope and functions of the pastoral office; and (b) the personal 
life of the pastor, his intellectual habits, social culture and spiritual character. 
Lectures and class discussions are supplemented by the student reading and 
submitting reviews of two books to be selected from a designated bibli- 
ography. 

Middlers, spring term, three hours a week. 

732. Pastoral Theology. A survey of the diversified responsibilities and 
varied relationships of the present-day pastor as the spiritual head of a local 
congregation and the director of its organizational activities: the character 
and conduct of public worship; the advantages and disadvantages of both 
the liturgical and the Reformed service; the administration of the Sacra- 
ments and the conduct of funerals and weddings. Special attention is 
given to pastoral visitation and pastoral care of the sick and the afflicted. A 
study of the art of pastoral counseling is supplemented with seminars under 
competent leadership of the Western Pennsylvania Psychiatric Hospital. 
The relationship of the pastor to the organizational activities of the Church 
at large will be presented in a series of lectures by the Executive Secretary 
of the Board of Administration. The aim of this course is to enable the 
student to approach his life work with a comprehensive knowledge of and 
adequate preparation for the various spheres of usefulness with which the 
ministry is identified. 

Seniors, winter term, four hours a week. 

750. Seminar in Sermon Composition. The purpose here is not to study 
the theory of preaching. Theory, coupled with practice in homiletic interpre- 
tation of. Scripture and outlining of topics, are preliminary to this course. 
The aim is distinctively sermon composition, with emphasis on the value of 
closely integrated material, precision in the choice and use of words, oral 
style, pictorial language, illustrations, etc. Original compositions will be pre- 
pared by the students and submitted for group discussion and criticism. 

Elective, open only to advanced students wfho have had all the required 
courses in Homiletics. Three quarter hours. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminars 31 



751. Preaching Values in tlie Old Testament. The aim of this course is 
to set forth some of the major values in the Old Testament for the modern 
pulpit, and to show the relevance of its basic truths in an age of scientific 
knowledge and social reconstruction. The historical, prophetical, and "wis' 
dom" writings will be examined as time permits. Class lectures are supple 
mented by research work and the writing of sermons on assigned texts and 
submitting same for criticism. 

Elective, three quarter hours. 



752. Preaching in the First Five Centuries. A study of the doctrinal and 
ethical content, the literary style, the homiletic method and the spiritual 
background of preaching in the early centuries when the Christian kerygma 
was a consuming passion and an irresistible force in the extension of the 
Christian religion. The purpose here is to acquaint the student with the 
cultural values in the biographical narratives, in the homiletic material and 
the vast literary output of this unparalleled period of church history, extend' 
ing from the days of the Apostles to the break'up of the Roman Empire. 
Largely a reading course with class discussions. 

Elective, three quarter hours. 



754. Ezekiel and Daniel. A study of the text, the exilic background and 
the post'exilic influence of Ezekiel. Problems presented by recent criticism 
are noted. Special attention is given to the symbolic chapters and apocalyptic 
visions of Daniel in the light of history. 

Elective, three quarter hours. 



Chapel Preaching 

Each student in the course of his work at the Seminary is required to 
preach three sermons (one each year) before the Faculty and student body. 
Texts or topics are assigned, and the sermons are criticized and graded on 
the basis of content, style and delivery. 



Field Work 

Six Units Required for Graduation 

A. Junior students are assigned to local churches under the direction of 
the respective pastors. The purpose is to give the student direct contact with, 
and practical experience in, the organizational activities of the church. The 
work to which students are assigned varies, depending upon local conditions 
and upon the student's capacity and adaptability. Ordinarily it consists of 
teaching, visiting, working with young people, supervising boys' groups, and 
assisting in the service of music and in the conduct of public worship. The 
student worker receives a minimum of $80.00 for the school year, together 
with necessary expenses, from the church he serves. Seminars, based on 
reports from the students and the fields, are conducted from time to time, 
as occasion requires. Two units toward graduation are given for satisfactory 
work in this field. 



32 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



B. For the four additional units in field work the student is required to 
spend the summer following the Middle Year (or the equivalent of four 
months), in a home mission station, or as a student pastor of a vacant congre' 
gation, or as a student assistant to a regular pastorate. This work is under 
the joint supervision of the Secretary of the Board of American Missions, the 
Synodical Superintendent of Missions, and the Department of Practical 
Theology of the Seminary. The student will receive a minimum of $100.00 
per month, plus traveling expenses to and from his field. 

C. Middle and Senior students who, for one reason or another, wish to 
engage in extra'curricular field work during the school year, must secure 
special permission from the Faculty. No credit toward graduation will be 
given for this work, except by special action of the Faculty. 

D. Students of other denominations, in order to receive credit for similarly 
supervised field work in which they may engage, must explain the nature 
of such work to the Department of Practical Theology and secure the ap' 
proval of the Faculty. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 33 



PUBLIC SPEAKING 

Dr. Cordray 

The purpose of this department is to assist each student to increase his 
effectiveness in pubhc address and oral reading. Speech training is required 
of each student for two terms, or until sufficient abiHty is shown to enable 
him to discharge the speech responsibilities of a student preacher satisfactorily. 

The services of this department are available to all students needing special 
help with speech problems, especially in preparing for the delivery of sermons 
before the Faculty and student body. 

A Wilcox Gay Recordio is provided by which students may analyze trans' 
scriptions of their own speech performances. 

811. Public Speaking. Review of fundamental principles of speech com' 
position and delivery; exercises in voice production and articulation; classroom 
performances of various types of speaking and oral reading, with criticism 
by instructor and class. 

Juniors, fall term, one hour a week. 

812. Public Speaking. Continuation of voice and articulation exercises as 
required; classroom performances of various types including the reading of 
Scripture and poetry, short Sabbath School lessons, and memorized sermon 
excerpts both original and selected. Emphasis is placed upon preparation 
for the delivery of Junior chapel sermons, each student being required to 
appear for criticism one week in advance of his chapel performance. 

Juniors, winter term, one hour a week. 

851. Public Speaking. A course offering speech instruction adapted to 
individual needs and interests. 

Elective, one quarter hour. 

852. Public Speaking. Similar to Course No. 851. 
Elective, one quarter hour. 

854. Preparation for Public Speaking. The requirements of a public 
address, methods of presenting material, the speech itself with human appeal, 
explanation, illustration, inducing action, and control of the voice. Class ses' 
sions follow on public reading, duties of a presiding officer, speaker introduc' 
tion, after'dinner speaking, presentation of gifts and remarks for special 
occasions. Study of Robert's Rules of Order. 

Elective, three quarter hours. Dr. Williamson. 



Special Announcement 



During the year 1946-1947, under the auspices of the Board 
of American Missions, a series of special lectures on problems in 
the field of Home Missions will be delivered by outstanding 
authorities. 



34 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 

THE DEPARTMENT OF GRADUATE STUDIES 

The Degree offered: The degree of Master of Theology 
(Th.M.) is granted to those candidates who fulfill the necessary 
requirements, as listed below. This is an earned professional 
degree indicating advanced study and proficiency in theological 
subjects. 

Entrance Requirements: For admission to the Graduate De- 
partment a student must present satisfactory evidence that he 
holds (1) the A.B. degree, or an equivalent degree, from an ac- 
credited college or university, and (2) the B.D. degree, or an 
equivalent degree, from this or any other accredited seminary 
or theological school. 

He must present his formal application for admission on 
the form provided for that purpose, together with transcripts of 
all his collegiate, professional, and graduate credits earned to 
date of such application, unless this information is already on file 
at the Seminary. 

He must receive the approval of Faculty's Graduate Studies 
Committee for acceptance as a bona fide student in the Gradu- 
ate Department of the Seminary. 

Fields of Study: At the initiation of his graduate work, the 
student must indicate the field in which he expects to do his 
major work. The following four fields are determined: (For 
available courses, see page 17.) 

I. Biblical Literature and Interpretation. 
II. History of Church and Doctrine. 
III. Christian Education and Philosophy. 
IV. Practical Theology and Administration, 

Credit Requirements: A minimum of one academic year of 
three quarters, of not less than 9 quarter hours each, totalling 
27 quarter hours class credit is required. The equivalent hours 
may be spread out, but must not exceed three academic years ex- 
cept by special action of the Graduate Studies Committee of the 
Faculty. 

A thesis written upon some phase of the work in the stu- 
dent's major field, is credited for 7 quarter hours value. This 
makes a total of 34 quarter hours credit required for the degree. 
The subject of the thesis must be approved by .^e /professor un-^,^ 
der whom the student is doing his major work, and must bef Ue- 



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The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



35 



llvered to the Graduate Studies Committee at least two calen- 
dar months prior to the commencement at which the student 
expects to receive his degree. The requirements for the format 
of the thesis may be had from the student's major professor. 

Of the 27 hours class room work required for the degree, 18 
quarter hours must be taken in the student's major field. The 
remaining 9 quarter hours may be elected at the student's option 
from any of the other fields. 



Time Limit: Under normal conditions, and except by special 
action of the Graduate Studies Committee to the contrary, all 
work for the degree inclusive of the thesis must be completed 
within four calendar years from the date of the student's matricu- 
lation in the Graduate Department. 

Expenses: Students will, of course, be expected to purchase 
any textbooks which their professors may require. 

The following fees and tuitions are charged to graduate 
students, both as candidates for degrees, and as auditors in the 
seminary: 

(1) Graduate Matriculation Fee, payable upon 
entrance . ' . 

(2) Regular Tuition (9 or more quarter hours) 
per quarter, payable upon registration for the 
quarter ....... 

(3) Tuition for 3 quarter-hour course (less than 9 
hours), payable upon registration for the 
quarter ....... 

(4) Diploma Fee, payable 15 days prior to granting 
the degree ....... 

Note: Graduate fees, excepting the diploma fee, are ap 
plied in building up the Graduate Section of the Library, and 
in the purchase of other Graduate Department supplies and equip-, i 
ment. 

Communications: Additional information relative to the 
work of the Graduate Department, together with forms for Ap- 
plication for Admission, may be secured by addressing: 

The Department of Graduate Studies 

The Pitts bur gh-Henia Theological Seminary 

616 West North Avenue, Pittsburgh 12, Pa. 



r 

^''-^' 



.S^ 



$ s.oo' 



10.00 



5.00 



5.00 




36 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



THE ACCELERATED PROGRAM 

AND 

SUMMER SESSION 

In the hope of meeting more rapidly the growing need for 
ministers and chaplains during the war emergency, the Seminary 
authorities in 1943 adopted the expedient of the accelerated pro- 
gram. This program was launched with a summer session during 
the summer of 1944, in which a full semester's work was provided 
for all classes. In certain courses, collaboration with the Western 
Theological Seminary was deemed feasible; all other courses were 
given independently. A second summer session, paralleling the 
first in time and content, was given during the summer of 1945. 
The third and concluding session of its kind will be given during 
the summer of 1946, primarily for the benefit of a class qualifying 
for their degree in September. 

SUMMER INSTITUTES OF THEOLOGY 

In order to meet the needs and numerous requests of the 
Church's returning chaplains, and also to fill an important place 
in the life of her regular ministry, the Seminary is joining with 
the Department of War Work of the Board of Christian Educa- 
tion in the inauguration of two Summer Institutes of Theology, 
one each, to be held in the Eastern and Midwest areas of the 
denomination. 

The campuses of Westminster College, New Wilmington, 
Pennsylvania, and of Monmouth College, Monmouth, Illinois, 
are being generously offered as locations for these Institutes in 
the summer of 1946. The dates are, for Westminster, June 10-15; 
and for Monmouth, July 1-6. Here congenial and pleasant sur- 
roundings and accommodations are assured. 

Guest professors and lecturers of outstanding abilities aug- 
ment the Seminary Faculty in the teaching work of the Institutes. 
The program is designed specifically for the Christian minister, 
with a view toward both his pastoral and homiletic work, and is, 
therefore, of an entirely practical and Inspirational nature. If 
there is sufficient interest and demand shown in these Institutes, 
they may become an integral part of the Seminary's annual 
program. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 37 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



ADMISSION 



Registration for the Fall Term. Tuesday, September 17, 
1946, is set aside for the registration of all new students, and also 
of upper class men having any irregularities in their standing 
or schedule, Wednesday morning is appointed for the registra- 
tion of all regular students in the Middle and Senior classes. It 
is important that students come for registration at the times ap- 
pointed. In case of late registration, a fee of one dollar is re- 
quired, and the period during which late registration is permitted 
is limited to ten days from the opening of each quarter. 

Normal Time for Entrance. The normal time to enter the 
Seminary is at the opening of the annual session in September. 
The regular program of training begins at this time, and exhibits 
the maximum values when taken in proper educational sequence. 

Credentials. Every applicant for admission must present 
satisfactory testimonials of his suitableness as a candidate for the 
ministry or other contemplated form of Christian service. These 
credentials include (1) a letter of introduction from his pastor or 
session certifying his active church membership and his 
qualifications for spiritual leadership; (2) a letter from the 
clerk of his presbytery, or corresponding church officer, indicating 
that he has been taken under proper ecclesiastical supervision and 
is officially recommended as a student of theology; and (3) evi- 
dence of full collegiate preparation, including an official transcript 
of his college credits. 

Declaration of Purpose. Before being admitted to the privi- 
leges of the Seminary, every student shall, in the presence of the 
Registrar, subscribe a declaration to the effect that while he is a 
student in the Seminary he will regularly, punctually, and diligently 



38 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



attend upon all the instructions of the professors, that he will 
promptly comply with the lawful requisitions of the Faculty and 
be subject to their authority, that he will honestly conform to all 
regulations of the Seminary, and that he will not propagate any 
opinions in opposition to the standards of the United Presbyterian 
Church. 

Entrance Deposit. From the moment of entrance, students are 
regarded as stewards of the Church's property, having special 
responsibility in connection with the free use of library and dormi- 
tory equipment. Each student, upon matriculation, is required to 
make a deposit of $5.00, which is returnable at the end of the 
Seminary course, less the insurance premium of $1.50 and any 
other necessary deductions. 

CLASSIFICATION 

Regular Degree Students. Applicants for admission as 
students in full standing to take the prescribed course in prepara- 
tion for the Degree of B.D. must have a bachelor's degree from a 
standard college or university, the degree having been secured 
without duplication of credit. 

Part-Time Students. Students who are not so situated that 
they can devote full time to Seminary work may be admitted by 
the Faculty to take such courses as their time permits In prepara- 
tion for some form of Christian service. But they must have the 
same academic preparation, and furnish the same credentials, as 
are required of Regular Degree Students. 

Classification by Years. Students who register for the full 
course are, for practical purposes, classified normally as Juniors 
during their first academic year, as MIddlers during their second 
year, and as Seniors during their third year. 

Transferred Students. Persons qualified for admission to the 
Seminary, who have successfully completed partial courses In some 
other school of theology accredited by the American Association 
of Theological Schools, may be admitted by the Faculty to corres- 
ponding standing In this Institution upon the presentation of 
satisfactory credentials, which should Include (1) a certificate of 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 39 



good standing and honorable dismission, and (2) a complete 
official transcript of their credits. Students transferring from non- 
accredited seminaries will be admitted only on probation. 

THE STUDENT'S SCHEDULE 

The Norm, Students adequately prepared, and able to give 
full time to Seminary work, are expected to follow the regular 
schedule, involving 16 credit hours a week throughout the entire 
Seminary course. 

Extra-curricular Work. No student shall take academic work 
in excess of the norm, without special permission from the Faculty. 
A record of scholarly work is pre-requisite to the granting of such 
permission. Moreover, without special permission from the Fac- 
ulty, which will not be granted unless the case be strictly excep- 
tional, no student shall assume responsibility for a congregation 
as pastor or as stated supply. 

Limitations . Students having outside work of any kind in- 
volving heavy demands upon their time will be limited to such 
courses as they can carry satisfactorily. And those who, for any 
reason, fail to do a satisfactory grade of work in their scheduled 
studies will also be subject to limitation by the Faculty. 

The Minimum. Students must carry at least 12 hours of con- 
current Seminary work in order to be entitled to the privileges of 
the dormitory. 

Registration each Quarter. At the beginning of each quarter 
every student shall file with the Registrar a complete list of his 
studies, together with a memorandum of all his outside worky 
actual and proposed. When his schedule of studies has been ap- 
proved, no change may be made by the student without consulting 
the Registrar. 

ATTENDANCE 

Regular and prompt attendance is indispensable to satisfac- 
tory work. All absence, or even tardiness, for whatever reason, 
has an injurious effect on the student's standing and progress. 
Absence immediately preceding or immediately following any 
holiday period is charged double against the student's record. 
Excuses for absence must be presented in writing, to the profess- 
ors concerned, immediately upon return to class work; and shall 
specify date, classes missed, and cause of absence. 



40 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



EXAMINATIONS 

In order to test the student's progress in the various depart- 
ments, written examinations are held at the close of each quarter. 
From these examinations and the class room work, the term grades 
of the student are determined. Seventy per cent, is required as a 
passing grade in every subject. A report of the student's attend- 
ance and credits is made to his presbytery, or corresponding 
church body, at the close of each quarter. 

GRADUATION: REQUIREMENTS AND AWARDS 

General Requirements. In order to graduate, a student must 
successfully complete the regular three-year course of prescribed 
and elective studies amounting to 144 quarter hours, together with 
six units of field work. At least one year of work in residence 
is required for graduation. 

The Degree of B.D. The Diploma of the Seminary with the 
Degree of Bachelor of Divinity is conferred only upon Degree 
Students who complete the regular course in a manner satisfactory 
to the Faculty and who display at least average ability in every 
department. 

Graduation Fee. A fee of $5.00 is charged to cover the cost 
of Diploma. This fee is due the 15th of the month preceding 
graduation. 

Graduation Honors. The honor. Cum Laude, is granted to all 
who throughout the Seminary course are clearly distinguished 
(1) for academic attainments, (2) for regular and punctual at- 
tendance, and (3) for general fitness for the gospel ministry. 
The honor. Magna Cum Laude, is granted to all who possess these 
qualifications in an unusual degree; and, Summa Cum Laude, in 
very rare instance, in recognition of superlative merit. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 41 



FACILITIES FOR STUDY 



THE SEMINARY LIBRARY 

The Seminary Library quarters were completely remodeled in 
connection with the merger of the Pittsburgh and Xenia Seminaries 
in 1930. A new reference room, with the most modern equipment, 
was added, — the gift of the Sixth United Presbyterian Church, 
Pittsburgh. The walls of the room display large colored panelings 
setting forth the historic insignia and other data of the older 
Presbyterian and Reformed Churches of the world. , , 

The former reference room was converted into a reading room, 
in which are provided some of the best current periodicals. A new 
stack room with steel shelving was added, also a large vault for rare 
books. 

About forty thousand books are now on the library shelves, 
and the Seminary policy is to keep adding to this number 
so as to maintain a standard and up-to-date working library in 
those departments of learning to which the theological student 
is devoting his attention. 

The Newburgh Collection 

The research department of the library contains the valuable 
collection of theological works, many of them dating from the early 
days of printing, which were secured abroad by the Rev. John M. 
Mason, D.D., in connection with the founding of the Seminary of 
New York, afterwards the Newburgh Seminary. 

The James Law Library Fund 

Through the generosity of the late James Law, Esq., of 
Shushan, N. Y., there was conveyed to the Seminary some years 
ago the sum of $15,000, to be employed as a library endowment. 

Library Hours 

« 

The library is open on week days to all ministers and others, 
without restriction of creed, subject to the same rules as apply to 
students. The hours are 9 to 1, 2 to 5:30, excepting Saturday, 
when the closing hour is 12. ^ 



42 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



The Reading Room 

The Reading Room, adjoining the Seminary Library, is open 
at all hours. The magazines, reviews, and other periodicals found 
here, represent the best in general literature, as well as in theology 
and religion. 

THE BIBLE LANDS MUSEUM 

The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary is one of the 
most active seminaries in the world engaged in archaeological 
research of Bible times in ancient Palestine. In conjunction with 
the American School of Oriental Research at Jerusalem, it has 
conducted explorations at Sodom and Gomorrah in 1924, excava- 
tions at Kirjath-Sepher in 1926, 1928, 1930, 1932, and excava- 
tions at Bethel in 1934. 

This work was inaugurated by the late Dr. M. G. Kyle, 
formerly Professor of Biblical Archaeology, who served as presi- 
dent of all these expeditions with the exception of the last: it 
was conducted after his death as a memorial to his work in 
Palestinian archaeology. The share of these antiquities which 
the Palestinian Archaeological Museum has allotted to the Semi- 
nary has been shipped to Pittsburgh, where more than a thousand 
of these objects are now on exhibit. Numerous other valuable 
pieces are awaiting special preparation before being placed on 
exhibition. 

These objects all illustrate in the most striking way the life 
of the people of Bible Lands, and so become of great value for 
interpretation as well as for apologetics. They illumine and 
corroborate the Biblical narratives. Thus an ineffaceable impres- 
sion is made upon the student of the trustworthiness of the Biblical 
record, for only real events leave anything to be dug up out of the 
ground. The objects in the Museum are used constantly in the 
classes of the Seminary. Opportunity is also afforded the public 
to visit the Museum at appointed times. 

Special gifts of archaeological specimens are being constantly 
added to the Museum through interested friends. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 43 



CULTURAL ADVANTAGES 



THE DENOMINATIONAL SEMINARY 

The denominational Seminary has peculiar advantages. Being 
under direct church control, it certifies its graduates as trained by 
thoroughly responsible teachers. The established standards are 
maintained, and approved educational methods are followed. 
Without dwarfing individuality, the church school gives to its 
graduates the unique stamp which wins recognition within denomi- 
national bounds. At the same time, the commingling of students 
from various evangelical bodies tends to develop in students mu- 
tual understanding and brotherly regard. The wide range of ac- 
quaintance with the Church and its leaders secured by attendance 
at the Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary is for the young minister an 
asset of great value. 

A METROPOLITAN ENVIRONMENT 

Pittsburgh has numerous elements of cultural value, chief 
among which are her schools and churches. The church life of our 
own and other denominations in Pittsburgh is of the best. The city 
and its environs, including more than eighty of our own congrega- 
tions, afford an excellent example of the Church at work. In all 
the denominations the religious thought is conservative and the 
methods of work progressive. The pulpits are well manned and 
the work generally well organized. Some of the ablest preachers 
of our own and other churches are located here. The student has 
opportunity to study the methods of men who are widely known 
as successful ministers. He may see mission work carried on along 
improved lines, and engage in it himself. He may study at first 
hand the most effective methods of Sabbath-school work. He is 
welcomed to the weekly meetings of the local ministerial unions, 
where live problems and issues are the subjects of discussion. 

Pittsburgh, together with the contiguous towns, is one of the 
great commercial centers of the world. It affords unexcelled oppor- 
tunities for the study of social, economical, political, racial, and 
other problems. It is in itself an education to live and work in such 
a city and catch the pulse of its busy life. Moreover, the benefit 
of contact with those engaged in the varied forms of work for social, 
moral and religious betterment, and of personal experience in such 



44 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



efforts, is evident to all. As the future ministers to persons socially 
environed, theological students should give themselves all conven- 
ient advantages to study mankind in their varied social relation- 
ships. 

AFFILIATION WITH THE UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 

Graduates from the three-year course of Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Theological Seminary who desire to take the A.M. degree at the 
University of Pittsburgh in the field of Religion and Religious 
Education may transfer as many as 14 semester credits (equiva- 
lent to 21 quarter hours) from the Seminary as advanced standing 
toward this degree. The remaining ten course credits and six 
thesis credits required for the A.M. degree must be taken at the 
University of Pittsburgh. A part of the ten course credits may 
be taken in other fields of the University than Religion and Re- 
ligious Education. 

Graduates of Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary will be 
allowed a maximum of 30 graduate credits (equivalent to 45 
quarter hours) as advanced standing toward the Ph.D. degree in 
Religion and Religious Education. An additional amount of 
six graduate credits may be granted to students taking courses 
at the Seminary beyond the regular three-year theological course, 
in which cases the courses must be agreed upon by the Graduate 
School of the University of Pittsburgh. 

The University of Pittsburgh will accept graduate credits from 
Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary in the fields of Biblical 
Literature, Church History, Theology, History and Philosophy of 
Religion, and Religious Education. 

The amount of advanced graduate standing granted to Semi- 
nary students who choose to do their major work at the University 
in fields other than Religion and Religious Education will be de- 
termined by heads of these departments. The advanced standing 
for both the A.M. and Ph.D. degree will vary some with depart- 
ments and students. 

A regular summer session or semester must elapse between the 
time of the student's graduation from the Seminary and the con- 
ferring of a graduate degree by the University of Pittsburgh. 

The procedure outlined in the foregoing paragraphs became 
effective February, 1933. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 45 



THE ALLEGHENY OBSERVATORY 

The Observatory is one of the oldest astronomical institutions 
in the country. It is affiliated with the University of Pittsburgh, 
but is located in Riverview Park, one of the highest points in 
Allegheny County. By special arrangements with the Director, 
the students of the Seminary have free access to it and the privilege 
of observing the heavens through its famous lenses. The stellar 
photographs are thrown on the screen, and these and the instru- 
ments and their workings explained to the students. 



THE BUHL PLANETARIUM 

Of the five planetariums In America, Pittsburgh now claims the 
finest and most up-to-date. Provided by the Buhl Foundation at 
a cost of over a million dollars, the Buhl Planetarium and Institute 
of Popular Science is located between the Post Office and the 
Carnegie Library, North Side, within a few minutes walk of the 
Seminary. Its most distinctive feature is the Theatre of the Stars 
under the large dome which crowns the building. Here, by means 
of the intricate Zeiss projector, the lecturer can give to 450 visitors 
at once a realistic view of the heavens as they appear from any 
part of the earth at any time. In addition to the central auditor- 
ium, there are six galleries for scientific exhibits in which the 
various achievements of science are vividly set forth. A lecture 
hall, seating 250, has modern equipment for sound-motion pic- 
tures, lantern slides and demonstration experiments. Four well- 
equipped work rooms are provided for the Amateur Astronomers' 
Association of Pittsburgh. Fall, winter, and spring short-term 
evening classes in science are offered for laymen. High School 
Science Demonstration Lectures, the School Science Fair, Eighth 
Grade Conducted Tours, and the Congress for science students, 
are some of the school activities provided by the Planetarium. 
Mr. Arthur L. Draper is the Director of this unique institution 
of education and culture. 



46 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



LIFE AT THE SEMINARY 



THE SEMINARY BUILDING 

The Seminary hall is located at the corner of North Avenue 
and Buena Vista Street, and overlooks West Park. On the first 
floor are the Mary J. Stevenson Reception Room, the President's 
Office, the Pressly Chapel, the Library, the Reference and Reading 
Rooms, and the Gymnasium. On the second floor are the Faculty 
Conference Room, the Bible Lands Museum, and five class rooms 
of ample proportions. The third, fourth and fifth floors are 
given over to dormitory uses. The dining room and kitchen are 
on the fifth floor. 

ROOMS AND ACCOMMODATIONS 

The dormitory rooms are arranged as follows: there are single 
rooms; suites of double rooms, in which two men occupy a study 
and a bedroom in common; and suites of three rooms, in which 
two men have a study in common and two single bedrooms ad- 
joining. There is a trunk room on the third floor. Each floor has 
bathrooms and lavatories. The Seminary provides furniture and 
bedding, including sheets, pillow cases, and one blanket for each 
bed. Students should bring extra blankets for their own use. 
Students will also furnish towels for their own use and provide 
for the laundering of these. All other dormitory laundry work 
will be looked after by the Seminary. 

Students in the dormitory are protected against personal loss 
by fire in the amount of $300 respectively. The premium, $1.50 
per student, covers the cost for three years. 

With the purpose of contributing to the comfort and health 
of the students, the oversight and maintenance of the rooms in the 
dormitory are placed in charge of a Committee of women appointed 
by the Board of Directors. Rooms are inspected from time to 
time. The ordinary supervision and control of the dormitory 
is committed to the President's Secretary. 

Rooms are provided free of charge to students who take not 
less than twelve hours of concurrent Seminary work. Upper 
classmen who desire an exchange of rooms must make application 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 47 



therefor, in writing, to the Secretary of the President. New stu- 
dents will have choice of the rooms not retained by upper class 
men, according to the order in which their written applications 
have been received. 



APARTMENTS FOR MARRIED STUDENTS 

The fifth floor of the Seminary building contains several 
two and three-room apartments which are available at a nominal 
charge to married students without children. Heat and light are 
supplied, but there are no individual cooking facilities. Men and 
their wives are, therefore, required to take their meals with the 
Student Eating Club which is located on the same floor. 

For men with children, it is hoped that the large stone dwell- 
ing immediately adjacent to the Seminary on North Avenue will 
be available for the opening of the 1946-1947 session in Septem- 
ber. This building is at present rented, but the required steps 
are being taken, through the Government's Fair Rents Board, 
to gain possession of it. The Seminary expects to provide house- 
keeping accommodations for from six to eight families at a nomi- 
nal rental. 

Prospective students may request that their names be placed 
upon the waiting list for either type of apartment, by addressing 
the Secretary to the President. 

THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF THE SEMINARY 

Adequate provision is made for the maintenance and develop- 
ment of the religious life. In addition to the private devotions of 
the men, there are various gatherings for social worship. Daily 
chapel services are held under the direction of the Faculty. A 
Seminary Communion Service is held in the Pressly Chapel soon 
after the opening of the session in the fall; and a similar service, 
especially for the Senior Class, is held during commencement week. 
The Day of Prayer for Educational Institutions is observed each 
year with appropriate exercises. "Family worship" is conducted 
by the students daily after the evening meal, there are weekly meet- 
ings of the students in class groups for prayer, and members 
of the student body take their turn in leading Chapel devotions 
in connection with their Chapel preaching service. The local 



48 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



group of volunteers for the mission fields does much to keep 
alive and active the missionary spirit. 

During the year, the students, of their own volition and at 
their own expense, fitted up An attractive Worship Roora.in the 
building, as a place of quiet retirement for religious meditation, 
and where worship is held every week-night at 10 o'clock. 

THE SOCIAL LIFE OF THE SEMINARY 

A social hour under the auspices of the Women's Dormitory 
Committee follows the Chapel service on the opening day of the 
Seminary year. Soon after the opening of the session, the Student 
Association arranges a reception for the new students. This is 
usually held in one of the local churches. Other social affairs are 
held at the option of the students during the year. For general 
social purposes there is a room set aside in the Seminary. The 
different congregations of the city invite the students to come to 
their socials and share their hospitality. 

THE WEBSTER MEMORIAL FORUM 

The Webster Memorial Forum is a student organization 
which meets at stated times for the discussion of pre-arranged 
subjects. It usually has a speaker whose address is correlated 
with open discussion. The organization originated in a desire on 
the part of the students for a closer fellowship between the student 
body and the Faculty. Dr. John Hunter Webster, formerly Profes- 
sor of New Testament Language and Literature, was asked to 
sponsor this Forum. After his death in 1933, the organization 
called itself the "Webster Memorial Forum" in honor of the one 
who had given substantial help to the students in their initial 
problems and discussions. 

MUSICAL OPPORTUNITY 

The Praise Service of the Church has long been a profound 
interest of the United Presbyterians. Pittsburgh is one of the 
major musical centers of America, having its own famed Symphony 
Orchestra, and such singing groups as the Mendelssohn Choir, 
the Bach Choir, and the Opera Society. Seminary students who 
can pass entrance tests have been singing in these organizations 
for many years. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 49 



Varying with the numbers and gifts of students in attendance, 
there has been a Chorus of Seminary men who sing for their own 
pleasure and development, and have presented programs to our 
local churches. 

A library of several hundred musical classics for male voices 
is available for singing groups. 



PHYSICAL CULTURE 

In the fall and spring, outdoor sports hold first place. The 
city tennis courts in the park, two minutes walk from the Seminary, 
may be used. The Seminary gymnasium provides additional 
opportunity for physical training. 

The Allegheny Y. M. C. A. is located beside the Seminary. 
With its splendid physical equipment, — gymnasium, bowling 
alleys, showers, and swimming pool, — it offers a fine opportunity 
to the men of the Seminary, all of whom have free membership 
in it. Provision is made for a variety of games. A physical 
examination is required of all who use the "Y" facilities. 



EXPENSES 

There is no charge for the use of dormitory rooms; but stu- 
dents who elect private lodgings must meet their own rental 
expenses. 

A dining room, located on the fifth floor of the dormitory, 
offers student board at cost. Although much of the equipment 
has been provided by the Seminary, the dining room is under the 
administration of the student body, and is practically self-sup- 
porting. With a view to the proper maintenance of equipment 
and its gradual replacement as that becomes necessary, the Club 
is accumulating a special fund, known as the sinking fund, to 
which each member contributes $3.00 a year. A limited number 
of students receive their board in compensation for their services 
as waiters. An initial deposit of $30.00 is required of each stu- 
dent to defray the bills of the first period. Each bill is for a 
four-week period. The average weekly cost throughout the year is 



50 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



approximately ^7.50 for a week of five and one-half days. The 
cost of food over the week ends is included in the estimate below. 
All men rooming in the building are required to take their meals 
in the Seminary dining hall. 

The Board of Christian Education of the United Presbyterian 
Church, through its retail department, the United Presbyterian 
Book Store, furnishes all text books at a reduction of twenty per 
cent; other books at a reduction of ten per cent. The Board also 
grants reasonable credit to students under presbyterial super- 
vision, where they are unable to make immediate payment. 



Estimated Annual Expense — Regular Session 

Board $300.00 Entrance deposit .... $ 5.00 

Books and Supplies $85.00 to $100.00 Incidentals 60.00 

Laundry 50.00 

Car Fare 50.00 Total . $550.00 to $565.00 



Self-Support and Student Aid 
All students for the ministry are urged and encouraged to 
maintain a maximum degree of financial independence. Self- 
reliance, rather than the expectation of special favors, is held up 
as the norm throughout life for ministers of the Gospel as well 
as other members of society. However, for those students who 
find it impossible to finance all of their Seminary course, the 
following opportunities are available: 



The Board of Education Aid 

The General Assembly authorizes the presbyteries to recom- 
mend worthy students for grants from the Board of Education. 
The maximum authorized for 1945-1946 was as follows: $130 to 
students of the first year, $120 to second-year students, and $90 
to third-year students. These grants are made only to students 
who attend the United Presbyterian Seminary. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 51 



Student Aid Fund 

There is a limited fund at the disposal of the Seminary for the 
assistance of needy students. This fund Is provided for emergenqr 
cases only and is administered under the careful supervision of the 
Faculty. 

The Lesson of History 

It may be encouraging to students to know that we do not 
have in the history of either Seminary a record of any student who 
has been obliged to leave the Seminary for financial reasons. 

COMPETITIVE SCHOLARSHIPS 



The following competitive scholarships have been provided 
for the benefit of United Presbyterian students. In order to 
compete, contestants must carry not less than the regular quota of 
studies; they must complete each term's work satisfactorily, 
without any conditions or failures; and they must furthermore 
meet the particular requirements of the desired scholarship or prize 
as hereinafter specified. Under each scholarship an award is made 
once each year, at which time the Faculty considers all regular 
degree students who, during the preceding twelve months, have 
completed the necessary amount of work in a satisfactory manner. 

The James Purdy Scholarship 

There exists in the possession of the Seminary the Purdy Fund, 
bearing the name of Its founder. The Income, not to exceed $300, 
is apportioned equally each year to the six members of the Junior 
Class who attain the highest average of excellence In their Seminary 
work. The scholarship Is subject to the conditions that no award 
be made to a student whose general average does not reach 85% 
or who receives a grade of less than 80% in any department, and 
that the entire Seminary course be finished at this Seminary. 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship 

In memory of the late Thomas Jamison, Esq., of the North 
Side, Pittsburgh, for many years a member of the Board of 
Trustees of the Seminary, Mrs. Jamison endowed a scholarship, 



52 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



the income of which, not to exceed $800, is given each year to the 
member of the Senior Class who attains the highest average of 
excellence in qualifications for the Christian ministry during the 
Junior and Middle years and the first two terms of the Senior year. 
In the matter of grades, his general average must reach 90 9^, 
and in no study must the grade be lower than 80%. The winner 
of this award must present to the Faculty within a reasonable 
time a thesis of not less than 10,000 words on a subject selected 
or approved by the Faculty. 

While this award is made without further conditions attached, 
it is the hope of the Faculty that each Jamison scholar will ap- 
preciate the importance of maintaining the Seminary's ideals and 
traditions of scholarship, and that he will use the award promptly 
in connection with a full session of graduate study in some insti- 
tution selected or approved by the Faculty. In this connection, he 
will be expected to make regular reports of the work he is doing 
and submit transcript of grades received. This scholarship af- 
fords a splendid opportunity to a worthy man each year for 
broadening his theological education and obtaining the rich cul- 
ture which comes with advanced study at the graduate level. 

The Jane Hogg Gardner Scholarship 

To the Senior student ranking second in qualifications for 
the ministry through the entire course, the Seminary awards the 
income of the Gardner bequest, not to exceed $200, but on condi- 
tion that there is no grade of less than 80% in any department, 
and that a satisfactory thesis of at least 5,000 words on an assigned 
subject be presented to the Faculty within a year from graduation. 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Foundation 

By bequest, in memory of her husband, the late Mrs. Hen- 
rietta M. Lee, of Oakmont Pa., established the "Robert A. 
Lee Church History Foundation," the annual income of which is 
to be given to the Senior student who ranks first in the entire 
course in Church History. Candidates for this award must attend 
this Seminary from the beginning of their Junior year and re- 
ceive no grade less than 80% in any department. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 53 



THE STUDENT ASSOCIATION 

The Student Association is the official organization of the 
student body. Its constitution states that the purpose of the 
Association shall be to promote the spirit of unity, self-govern- 
ment, social and spiritual welfare of the students, and to main- 
tain a sympathetic understanding and close cooperation with 
the Faculty. The Student Board, the governing agency of the 
Association, is composed of the President of the Eating Club, 
the Secretary of the Preaching Association, a representative 
from each class, and a member at large. Dues of 50 cents a 
month are assessed to cover student activity. This association 
was formally organized in December, 1945. 



THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

All who have been enrolled as students of The Pittsburgh- 
Xenia Theological Seminary or its constituent institutions are en- 
titled to membership. The object of the Association is to cherish 
the memories of Seminary life, to maintain an active interest in 
Seminary affairs, and to promote the welfare of the Seminary and 
the Church. A business meeting, followed by a social hour and 
banquet, is held each year in connection with the Commencement 
Exercises. The business meeting is held in the First Church, 
North Side, Pittsburgh, at 4:00 P. M. of Commencement Day. At 
this time the Association elects officers to serve for the ensuing 
year. The business meeting is followed by a social hour culminat- 
ing In the Alumni Banquet at 5:30 P. M. Alumni and friends of 
the Seminary are urged to attend. 

All members are requested to send to the Seminary Library 
copies of such books, pamphlets and important magazine articles 
as they may have published. 

The officers of the Alumni Association are: President, the 
Rev. Robert P. MacDonald; Vice-President, the Rev. Frank C. 
Davidson*; Secretary-Treasurer, the Rev. James A. Pollock, D.D. 

* Died March 28, 1946 



54 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



AWARDS GRANTED, 1944-1945 

Degree of Bachelor of Divinity 

Class of January, 1945 

Thomas Donald Black ....... Mercer, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1942 
Mercer Presbytery 

Colin Henry Campbell ...... Clinton, Mass. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1942 
Boston Presbytery 

Paul Robert Coleman Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1942 
Allegheny Presbytery 

EbwARD Ralph De Lair ....... Butler, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1942 
Butler Presbytery 

Ralph Armstrong Edie Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B, Sterling College, 1942 
Monongahela Presbytery 

Roger David Galey, Jr Sewickley, Pa. 

A.B., Cedarville College, 1942 
Allegheny Presbytery 

Hugh Eugene Marsh ....... Monmouth, 111. 

B.S., Monmouth College, 1942 
Monmouth Presbytery 

Bruce Edward Milligan ...... Des Moines, Iowa 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1942 
Des Moines Presbytery 

Harry William Rankin . . . . . . Wellsville, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1942 
Steubenville Presbytery 

Robert Dean Sharpe ....... Sparland, III. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1942 
Monmouth Presbytery 



Class of May, 1945 

William Benjamin Adair . . . Nasir, Anglo-Egyptian Sudan 

A.B., Sterling College, 1943 
Arkansas Valley Presbytery 

Carl King Boyer ....... Monongahela, Pa. 

B.S., Denison University, 1911 
Pittsburgh Baptist Association 

James Wilbur Curry ....... Eskridge, Kans. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1943 
Kansas City Presbytery 

Robert Henry Kempes ....... Oak Park, 111. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1943 
Chicago Presbytery 

Harold Harper McConnell, Jr. .... . Edgewood, Pa. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1943 
Monongahela Presbytery 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 55 



Scholarships and Prizes 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship (not to exceed ^800) to Mr. Thomas Donald 
Black. 

The Jane Hogg Gardner Scholarship (not to exceed $200) to Mr. Harry 
William Rankin. 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Award to Mr. Harry William Rankin. 

Graduation Honors: Magna Cum Laude, to Mr. Thomas Donald Black and Mr. 
Harry William Rankin; Cum Laude, to Mr. Robert Henry Kempes. 

The James Purdy Scholarships (six In number, not to exceed $50 each) to the 
following Juniors: Malcolm Smith Alexander, Richard Eugene Johnson, 
Wesley Glenn Jones, Willard McCulloch Morris, Harold Edgar Scott, and 
Robert John Stahmer. 



56 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS, 1945 - 1946 

Senior Class 

Candidates for Degree, September, 1945 - ~ 

Ellsworth Edwards Caylor Butler, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1943 
Allegheny Presbytery 

Robert Hamilton Clark ...... Salineville, Ohio 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1943 
Westmoreland Presbytery 

Herbert Holtz Flitton, Jr. Baltimore, Md. 

A.B., Wheaton College, 1943 
Philadelphia Presbytery 

Donald Wiluam Jolly ...... Los Angeles, Calif. 

A.B., Chapman College, 1943 
Los Angeles Presbytery 

Walter Donald Kramer ...... Mt. Lebanon, Pa. 

A.B., Bethany College, 1943 
Monongahela Presbytery 

Charles Harvey McClung, Jr. ..... . Vevay, Ind. 

A.B., Indiana Central College, 1943 
Indiana Presbytery 

Ray Alvin McCreight ....... Clearfield, Iowa 

A.B., Tarkio College, 1943 
College Springs Presbytery 

Robert Erwin McNeill ...... New Castle, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1943 

Presbytery of Shenango, Presbyterian Church, U.S.A. 

James Wilson Pollock ...... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1945 
Allegheny Presbytery 

Howard Darius Rose Creighton. Pa. 

A.B., Greenville College, 1940 

Oil City Conference, The Free Methodist Church 

Lawrence Wayne Stitt Vandergrlft, Pa. 

A.B., University of Michigan, 1943 
Kiskiminetas Presbytery 

Roland Marshall Wilson Chase City, Va. 

A.B., Hampden-Sydney College, 1931 
Hudson Presbytery 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



57 



Candidates for Degree, May, 1946 

John Lawrence Ayers Ezel, Ky. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1944 
Muskingum Presbytery 

John Lincoln Clark . New Waterford, Ohio 

A.B., Baldwin-Wallace College, 1941 

North East Ohio Conference, The Methodist Church 

John Claude Gould, Jr Unity, Pa. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 194S 
Westmoreland Presbytery 

Henry Holyoak Steubenville, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1943 

North East Ohio Conference, The Methodist Church 

Richard Eugene Johnson ...... Ontario, Oregon 

B.S., Sterling College, 1944 
Idaho Presbytery 

George Loren Jones Pittsburg, Kans. 

A.B, Sterling College, 1943 
Kansas City Presbytery 

Harold Edgar Scott ........ Sterling, Kans. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1944 
Oklahoma Presbytery 

Robert John Stahmer ....... Omaha, Nebr. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1944 
Nebraska Presbytery 



Middle Class 

Entered in September, 1944 A"^^ ^"7 ^^ ^ " 

Malcolm Smith Alexander ..... Culver City, Calif. 
A.B., University of Southern California, 1933 
LL.B., University of Southern California Law School, 1936 
Los Angeles Presbyter}"- 

Robert Mason Barnes ....... Akron, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1944 
Muskingum Presbytery 

James Isalah Davis Henderson, N. C. 

A.B., Knoxville College, 1944 
Tennessee Presbytery 

Wesley Glenn Jones King Hill, Idaho 

A.B., College of Idaho, 1944 
Idaho Presbytery 

Willard McCulloch Morris .... Colorado Springs, Colo. 
A.B., Sterling College, 1937 
Colorado Presbytery 



58 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



Entered in January, 1945 

J. Rodney Beal Bellevue, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1945 

Allegheny Presbytery -^^ 

Dale Edwin Brehmer Loveland, Colo. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1945 
Colorado Presbytery 

William Paul Cooke ....... Columbus, Ohio 

A.B., Texas Christian University, 1945 
Xenia Presbytery 

Ralph McGranahan Donaldson ..... Beaver, Pa. 
A.B., Westminster College, 1945 
Beaver Valley Presbytery 

John Leonard McCreight New Concord, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1945 
Muskingum Presbytery 

Paul Morgan Musser ...... Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio 

A.B., Westminster College, 1945 
Qeveland Presbytery 

Kenneth Edward Rasmussen Jetmore, Kansas 

A.B., Sterling College, 1945 
Arkansas Valley Presbytery 



Junior Class 

Entered in Summer, 1945 



Kenneth Virgil Kettlewell .... 
A.B., Muskingum College, 1945 
Muskingum Presbytery 

Robert Harlan Meneilly . . . . . 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1945 
Monongahela Presbytery 

Samuel Robb McLaughlin .... 
A.B., Monmouth College, 1945 
Monmouth Presbytery 

Entered in Fall, 1945 

Cletus Valentine Baker ..... 
Senior, Tarkio College, Tarkio, Mo. 
Illinois Southern Presbytery 

Warwick Wallace Hutchison . . . . 

Senior, Westminster College, New Wilmington, Pa. 
Monongahela Presbytery 



Gerald Le Roy Selby 

A.B., Sterling College, 1946 
Arkansas Valley Presbytery 



New Concord, Ohio 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

New Concord, Ohio 

Percy, 111. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Benkelman, Nebr. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



59 



Entered in Winter, 1945-46 



Eugene Hoopes Ammon 
B.S., Sterling College, 
Mercer Presbytery 



1941 



Robert Hall Mayo 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1942 
Allegheny Presbytery 

Frank William Montgomery 
A.B., Sterling College, 1940 
Kansas City Presbytery 



Entered in Spring, 1946 



Charles Raymond Graham 
A.B., Sterling College, 1942 
Xenia Presbytery 

Francis Bruce Johnston 

A.B., Westminster College, 1941 
Mercer Presbytery 



New Wilmington, Pa. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Topeka, Kansas 

Columbus, Ohio 
New Wilmington, Pa. 



Part-time Students 

Donald Charles Dalke North Braddock, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1945 
Pittsburgh Conference, The Methodist Church 

Paul James Halstead Greensburg, Pa. 

B.Mus., Westminster Choir College, 1943 
Pittsburgh Conference, The Evangelical Church 

*Clark Russell Kerr McKeesport, Pa. 

A.B., Asbury College, 1943 

Pittsburgh Conference, The Methodist Church 

Earl Wilford Lighthall ...... Murrysville, Pa. 

A.B., Syracuse University, 1936 

Pittsburgh Conference, The Methodist Church 

William Rex Moon Greenville, 111. 

A.B., Asbury College, 1944 

North East Ohio Conference, The Methodist Church 

*Raymond Joseph Patterson Tama, Iowa 

A.B., Sterling College, 1944 
Cedar Rapids Presbytery 

Ernest George Smith ....... Gibson, Iowa 

A.B., Buena Vista College (la.), 1942 
Des Moines Presbytery 

* Summer Session only 



60 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



WiLMER Neil Thornburg . . . . . . Monessen, Pa. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1945 
Kansas City Presbytery 

Leslie Morris Van Inwegen ...... Clinton, Pa. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1942 
Beaver Valley Presbytery 

Margaret Lucille Vetter ...... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1942 
Allegheny Presbytery 

Ross Ellsworth Winner ...... Smithfield, Ohio 

A.B., Baldwin-Wallace College, 1942 

North East Ohio Conference, The Methodist Church 



The Graduate School 

'A*i'iL'H(Ul»«^ James Hiram Blackwood ...... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

^ A.B., Westminster College, 1930 _ 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1933 
Monongahela Presbytery 

James Hugh Dean ....... Fairpoint, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1941 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1944 

Wheeling Presbytery 

William James Grossman ...... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1934 _ 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1939 

Allegheny Presbytery 

Franklin Willis Harper ...... Harrisville, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1940 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1943 

Butler Presbytery 

'W^'^ilWn Walter Edwin McCrory ...... Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

' A.B., Monmouth College, 1934 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1937 
Monongahela Presbytery 

Howard Dewalt McMurray ...... Oil City, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1931 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 193S 

Lake Presbytery 

Hugh Eugene Marsh Clinton, Pa. 

B.S., Monmouth College, 1942 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 194S 

Monongahela Presbytery 

George D. Munro Carnegie, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1935 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1939 

Monongahela Presbytery 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 61 



James Beaver Orth, Jr. ...... . Houston, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1938 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1941 

Chartiers Presbytery 

Clifford Emerson Simpson, Jr. ..... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1939 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1942 

Butler Presbytery 

Alfred Lewis Spotts West View, Pa. 

B.S., Michigan State Normal College, Ypsilanti, 1941 
Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1944 
Allegheny Presbytery 

Clark Kenneth Weber ...... Elizabeth, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1938 

Th.B., Pittsburghr-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1941 

Westmoreland Presbytery 



SUMMARY OF ATTENDANCE 

Seniors ............. 20 

Middlers 12 

Juniors 11 

Part-time Students . . . . . . . . . .11 

Graduate Students .12 

66 




62 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



INSTITUTIONS REPRESENTED 

(Undergraduates only) 

As bury College, Kentucky ......... 2 

BaldwIrihWallace College, Ohio ........ 2 

Bethany College, West Virginia ........ 1 

Buena Vista College, Iowa ......... 1 

Carnegie Institute of Technology, Pennsylvania ..... 1 

Chapman College, California ........ 1 

College of Idaho ........... 1 

Greenville College, Illinois ......... 1 

Hampden-Sydney College, Virginia ....... 1 

Indiana Central College, Indiana ........ 1 

Knoxville College, Tennessee ........ 1 

Monmouth College, Illinois ......... S 

Muskingum College, Ohio ......... 8 

Sterling College, Kansas ......... 14 

Syracuse University, New York ........ 1 

Tarkio College, Missouri ......... 2 

Texas Christian University ......... 1 

University of Michigan .......... 1 

University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania ....... 2 

University of Southern California 1 

Westminster Choir College, New Jersey ....... 1 

Westminster College, Pennsylvania ....... 4 

Wheaton College, Illinois ......... 1 

54 



LOCALITIES REPRESENTED 

(Undergraduates only) 

California .2 

Colorado 2 

Idaho 1 

Illinois ............ 2 

Indiana ............ 1 

Iowa 3 

Kansas ............ 4 

Kentucky ............ 1 

Maryland 1 

Massachusetts ........... 1 

Nebraska 2 

North Carolina ........... 1 

Ohio 10 

Oregon ............ 1 

Pennsylvania 21 

Virginia ............ 1 

54 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 63 

SPECIAL LECTURES, 1945-1946 

In the Pressly Chapel 

The Rev. James M. Ferguson, D.D. 

"Observations from Moderator's Tour" 

The Rev. John H. Gerstner, Ph. D. 
"The Pedagogy of Grace" 

The Rev. Robert W. Gibson, D.D. 

"The Work of the Board of Christian Education' 

The Rev. Harry J. Hager, Ph.D., D.D. 
"For Such a Time as This" 

The Rev. Charles L. Hussey, D.D. 
"Pensions for Ministers" 

The Rev. A. E. Kelly, D.D. 

"The World-Wide Christian Advance" 

The Rev. William E. Lampe, Ph.D., LL.D. 
"Stewardship" 

The Rev. W. Donald McClure 
"Our Sudan Mission" 

Mr. Joseph Mosca 

"Methods of Visual Education" 

Representative of 

"Alcoholics Anonymous" 

The Rev. G. M. Robb 

"A New Star in the Field of Blue" 

The Rev. A. R. Robinson, D.D., LL.D. 
"A Holy Week Meditation" 

The Rev. J. Coventry Smith, D.D. 

"Present Day Problems of Christianity in Japan" 

The Rev. Rockwell C. Smith, Ph. D. 

"The Rural Church" — Series of four lectures 

The Rev. A. K. Stewart, D.D. 
"In the American Field" 

The Rev. J. H. Stewart, D.D. 

"Thrills in Missionary Work In India" 

The Rev. A. W. Stremel, D.D. 
"Jesus and the Sinner" 

The Rev. Mills J. Taylor, D.D. 

"Present Conditions of Our Work Abroad" 

The Rev. D. M. Walton, D.D. 

"The Church's Community Responsibility" 

In the Western Seminary Chapel 

The Rev. Adolph Keller, D.D. 

"The Present Religious Conditions In Europe" 



64 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



HISTORICAL ROLL OF PROFESSORS 

Period of 
Service 
1794-1819 
1820-1826 
1821-1842 
1825-1829 
1829-1831 
1832-1870 
1834-1834 
1835-1871 
1835-1836 
1839-1855 
1839-1840 
1842-1846 
1843-1846 
1847-1855 
1847-1884 
1851-1887 
1855-1875 
1855-1858 
1855-1874 
1858-1874 
1858-1873 
1864-1874 
1867-1870 
1883-1883 
1871-1886 
1871-1880 
1873-1888 
1873-1914 
1873-1878 
1876-1891 
1879-1899 
1884-1902 
1885-1921 
1886-1909 
1886-1943 
1889-1894 
1888-1892 
1893-1915 
1895-1905 
1899-1921 
1903-1930 
1905-1923 
1907-1940 
1907-1914 
1908-1933 
1914-1930 
1914-1929 
1915-1931 
1920-1926 
1922-1926 
1922- 
1923- 
1924- 
1926-1930 
1931- 
1932- 
1942- 
1942- 
1946- 





Place of 


Inauguration 


John Anderson Service 


John Banks .... 




Philadelphia 


James Ramsey .... 




Canonsburg 


Joseph Kerr 






Pittsburgh 


MuNGO Dick 






Pittsburgh 


John Taylor Pressly 






Allegheny 


David Carson .... 






Canonsburg 


Thomas Beveridge 






Canonsburg 


Moses Kerr .... 






Allegheny 


Joseph Claybaugh 






Oxford 


Samuel W. McCracken 




] Oxford 


James Martin 




Canonsburg 


James Lemonte Dinwiddie 




Allegheny 


Abraham Anderson 




Canonsburg 


Alexander Downs Clark 




Allegheny- 


David Reynolds Kerr . 




Allegheny 


Samuel Wilson 




Xenia 


William Davidson 






Oxford 


Alexander Young . 






Oxford 


John Scott .... 






Monmouth 


Joseph Clokey 






Xenia 


Andrew Morrow Black 






Monmouth 


David Alexander Wallace 






Monmouth 


David Alexander Wallace 






Xenia 


Joseph Tate Cooper 






Allegheny 


William Bruce 






Xenia 


James Gillespie Carson 






Xenia 


William Gallogly Moorehead 






Xenia 


Jackson Burgess McMichael 






Xenia 


Alexander Young . 






Allegheny 


James Harper 






Xenia 


David MacDill 






Xenia 


David A. McClenahan 






Allegheny 


James Alexander Grier 






Allegheny 


John McNaugher 






Allegheny 


Wilbert Webster White 






Xenia 


Oliver Joseph Thatcher 






Allegheny 


John A. Wilson . 






Allegheny 


John Douds Irons . 






Xenia 


Joseph Kyle 






Xenia 


Jesse Johnson 






Xenia 


John Elliott Wishart . 






Xenia 


William Riley Wilson . 






Allegheny 


Charles Frederick Wishart 






Allegheny 


John Hunter Webster . 






Xenia 


Melvin Grove Kyle 






Xenia 


James Doig Rankin 






Pittsburgh 


David Frazier McGill . 






Pittsburgh 


James Gallaway Hunt 






Pittsburgh 


James Harper Grier 






Pittsburgh 


Robert McNary Karr . 






St. Louis 


James Leon Kelso 






St. Louis 


George Boone McCreary 






St. Louis 


Robert Nathaniel Montgomery 






Pittsburgh 


Albert Henry Baldinger 






Pittsburgh 


Clarence Joseph Williamson 






Pittsburgh 


George Anderson Long 






Pittsburgh 


Theophilus Mills Taylor . 






Pittsburgh 


Addison Hardie Leitch 






Pittsbursh 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 65 



DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS 

The provision of modern theological education without charge 
to students requires an extensive outlay on the part of the Semi- 
nary. The maintenance of the Seminary building and equipment 
is but one item in the annual draft upon the treasury. At the 
present time the income from endowment is quite insufficient to 
meet current expenses. 

The claims of the Seminary are, therefore, submitted to the 
consideration of all who wish to honor the Lord with their sub- 
stance. Congregations, as well as individuals, are asked to give 
their help to the institution. Appeal is also made to all who pur- 
pose making bequests to remember the Seminary, for the training 
of the ministry is the primary educational task of the Church. 

All bequests should be drawn as follows: 

For Personal Property 

I hereby give and bequeath to The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theo- 
logical Seminary of the United Presbyterian Church of North 

America, the sum of dollars to 

constitute a part of the permanent funds of the institution. 

For Real Estate 

I hereby give and devise to The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological 
Seminary of the United Presbyterian Church of North America, 
its successors and assigns, forever, all that lot or piece of ground 
^carefully describing the property), the same to hold or dispose 
of for the benefit of the permanent funds of the institution. 

Bequests may also be made for special funds, scholarships, or 
lectures. 

Care should be taken to use the corporate name as given 
above, and to have the bequest conform to the laws of the State 
governing it. 



66 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



CORRESPONDENCE 

In general, correspondence should be addressed to the Pres- 
ident of the Faculty, the Rev. George A. Long, D.D., 616 West 
North Avenue, North Side, Pittsburgh 12, Pa. 

Letters relating to the endowment and funds should be ad- 
dressed to Mr. M. J. Hein, Treasurer, using the Seminary address 
given above. 

All letters concerning registration and admission to the Sem- 
inary should be sent to the Registrar's Office. Likewise, all re- 
quests for transcripts of record should be addressed to the Regis- 
trar in properly written form, — giving the full name of the appli- 
cant, his present address, the place and period of attendance, and 
the name and address of the institution and official to whom the 
transcript is to be sent. The request should be accompanied by 
the usual fee of one dollar (^1.00), unless the transcript is the ap- 
plicant's first, or it is to be used in connection with an application 
for a Chaplaincy in the Armed Forces of the United States. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Thelological Seminary 



67 



INDEX 



Academic Regulations 

Accelerated Program . 

Accommodations in the Dormitory 

Admission, Terms of . 

Alumni Association 

Apartments for Married Students 

Archaeology, Semitics and . 

Attendance, Summary of 

Awards Granted, 1944-1945 

Bible Lands Museum . 

Calendar for 1946 and 1947 

Calendar of the Seminary . 

Chapel Preaching 

Church History and Government 

Classification of Students . 

Control and Management of the Seminary 

Correspondence .... 

Courses of Instruction, Description of 

Credentials Required for Admission 

Cultural Advantages of the Seminary 

Curriculum, in Outline 

Degrees Granted, 1944-1945 

Degree of B.D., Requirements for 

Degree of Th.M., Requirements . 

Denominational Seminary, Advantages of 

Dining Club 

Directors, Board of . 

Donations and Bequests 

Dormitory, Women's Committee 

Elective Courses 

Emeritus Professors 

English Bible 

Examinations 

Expenses . 

Facilities for study 

Faculty 

Fee at Graduation 

Field Work 

Graduate Studies, Department of 

Graduation, Requirements and Awards 

Historical Roll of Professors 

Honors, Cum Laude Series . 

Institutions and Localities Represented 

Library and Reading Room 

Life at the Seminary . 

Location of the Seminary Building 



37 
36 
46 
37 
S3 
47 
18 
61 
54 
42 

6 

5 

31 
25 
38 

7 
66 
18-33 
37 
43 
16 
54 
40 
34 
43 
49 

8 

65 
10 
17 
11 
23 
40 
49 
41 
11 
40 
31 
34 
40 
64 
40 
62 
41 
46 
46 



68 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Thelological Seminary 



Musical Opportunity 

New Testament Literature and Exegesis 

Observatory, The Allegheny 

Philosophy of Religion and Religious Education 

Physical Culture 

Planetarium, The Buhl Foundation 

Practical Theology 

Pre-Seminary Studies . 

Pre-Theological Major 

Prizes Awarded, 1945 . 

Public Speaking 

Purpose of the Seminary 

Register of Students, 1945-1946 

Registration ..... 

Religious Education, Philosophy of Religion and 

Religious Life at the Seminary . 

Rooms and Accommodations 

Schedule, The Norm and Modifications 

Scholarships, Competitive . 

Self-Support and Student Aid 

Semitics and Biblical Archaeology 

Social Life at the Seminary 

Special Lectures, 1945-1946 

Standing of the Seminary . 

Student Association .... 

Students, Register of, 1945-1946 . 

Summer Institute .... 

Summer Session .... 

Term and Course, prescribed by General Assembly 

Theology, Systematic and Biblical 

Trustees, Board of . 

University of Pittsburgh, Affiliation with 

Webster Memorial Forum . 

Women's Dormitory Committee . 

Y.M.C.A., Allegheny Branch . 



48 
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/ 



X 



THE 

PITTSBURGH-XENIA 

THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 




FOUNDED 1794 



ANNUAL CATALOGUE 
1946-1941 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 
1947-1948 



\ 



/ 



THE 
ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

OF THE 

Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Theological Seminary 

OF 

THE UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 
OF NORTH AMERICA 

616 West North Avenue 
PITTSBURGH 12, PA. 

1946-1947 

-8? 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

FOR THE YEAR 

1947-1948 



THE SEMINARY CALENDAR 

1947 

16 May - 6 Sept. Summer Session in Practical Theology for stu- 
dents previously qualified in this Seminary 

Fall Term 

9 Sept. Registration of new students, 9:00 A.M. — 4:00 P.M. 

Assignment of rooms, 4:00 P.M. 
10 Sept, Registration of all regular Middlers and Seniors 
9:00 A.M.— 1:00 P.M. 

10 Sept. Formal Opening of the Session 

Opening Address in Pressly Chapel, 2:00 P.M. 
Reception to new students, 3:00 P.M. 

11 Sept. Class work begins, 8:30 A.M. 

19 Sept. Seminary Co\mmunion Service, 7:00 P.M. 

Sacramental Address by the Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D. 
26 Nov. Last Day of the Fall Term 
21 Nov. Thanksgiving Day 

Winter Term 
28 Nov. Class work begins, 8:30 A.M. 

20 Dec. Christmas Vacation begins, after regular class hours 

1948 

6 Jan. Class work resumes, 8:30 A.M. 
11 Feb. Day of Prayer for Colleges and Seminaries 

Address by the Rev. James H. Grier, D.D., LL.D. 
26 Feb. Last Day of the Winter Term 



Spring Term 
27 Feb. Class work begins, 8:30 A.M. 
25 Mar. Easter Recess begins, after regular class hours 
30 Mar. Class work resumes, 8:30 A.M. 
9 May Baccalaureate Service, ^■.QQY.yi. 
The Emsworth U. P. Church 
Sermon by Professor H. Ray Shear 

9 May Senior Communion Service, 4:00 P.M. 
The Pressly Chapel 
Professor Addison H. Leitch officiating 
12 May Annual Meeting of the Board of Directors, 2:00 P.M. 

12 May Senior Reception, — the Board of Directors, 7:00 P.M. 

13 May Annual Meeting of the Alumni Association, 4:00 P.M. 

The First Church, North Side, Pittsburgh 
13 May Alumni Dinner, S:30 F.M. 
13 May Graduating Exercises, 8:00 P.M. 

The First Church, North Side, Pittsburgh 



• CALENDAR FOR 1947 • 




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The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



THE CONTROL AND MANAGEMENT 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary is the result of a 
union of the Pittsburgh and Xenia Seminaries consummated in 
1930. According to its proper ancestry the Xenia Seminary was 
founded in 1794 by the Associate Presbyterian Church. The 
Pittsburgh Seminary was founded in 1825 under the auspices of 
the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church. The Seminary as 
now established is under the immediate control of the American 
Synods of the United Presbyterian Church and the ultimate review 
control of the General Assembly. Its management is committed to 
a Board of Directors and Trustees. The Board of Directors consists 
of thirty-five members, ministers or ruling elders, who are nom- 
inated by the several Synods to the General Assembly for elec- 
tion on the basis of each Synod having one representative for 
every five thousand church members or a major fraction thereof. 
Each Synod has at least one representative. The Board of 
Directors has the general government of the Seminary, subject 
to the authority of the Synods and the General Assembly, appoints 
the Trustees, and provides for the financial maintenance of the 
institution. The Board of Trustees consists of twelve members. 
It is the corporate body which holds and manages the real estate 
and the funds of the Seminary. The term and the course of 
study are determined by the General Assembly. 



STANDING OF THE SEMINARY 

The Seminary is an accredited member of the American 
Association of Theological Schools, and has had this standing 
from the time of the adoption of the Association's accrediting 
system in 1938. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



Synod of New York 




Term 




Expires 


The Rev. Roy E. Grace, Th.M. 


Upper Darby, Pa. 


1947 


The Rev. James M. Guthrie . . . Floral Park, L. I., N. Y. 


1947 


The Rev. J. M. Findley Brown, D.D. 


. Walton, N. Y. 


1948 


The Rev. Claire E. Hawthorne, D.D. 


Takoma Park, Md. 


1948 


The Rev. J. Kenneth Miller, M.A., D.D. 


Garden City, N. Y. 


1949 


Synod of Pittsburgh 






The Rev. Paul M. Gillis, Th.M., Ph.D. 


Turtle Creek, Pa. 


1947 


The Rev. H. H. McConnell, Th.M., D.D. ' . . 


New York, N. Y. 


1947 


The Rev. James T. Vorhis, Th.M., D.D. . 


Coraopolis, Pa. 


1947 


The Rev. R. W. Gibson, D.D 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


1948 


The Rev. J. Reade McCrory, D.D. 


Canonsburg, Pa. 


1948 


Mr. J. S. Mason 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


1948 


Mr. Frank H. Davis ..... 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


1949 


The Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D. 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


1949 


First Synod of the West 






The Rev. Walker S. Brownlee 


Hamburg, N. Y. 


1947 


The Rev. S. C. Gamble, D.D 


Slippery Rock, Pa. 


1947 


The Rev. W. B. McFarland 


Sheakleyville, Pa. 


1947 


Mr. Albert B. McClester 


Butler, Pa. 


1948 


The Rev. J. Ralph Neale, D.D. . . New Wilmington, Pa. 


1948 


The Rev. Wm. F. Rotzler, D.D. 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


1948 


The Rev. J. M. Ferguson, D.D. 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


1949 


The Rev. S. E. Irvine, D.D. .... 


New Castle, Pa. 


1949 


The Rev. Don P. Montgomery, D.D. 


Youngstown, Ohio 


1949 


Synod of Ohio 






The Rev. James H. Dean .... 


Fairpoint, Ohio 


1947 


The Rev. Alfred Martin, Th.M. 


East Liverpool, Ohio 


1948 


The Rev. Frank J. Irvine .... 


Dearborn, Mich. 


1949 



Second Synod 

The Rev. R. A. Jamieson, D.D. 
The Rev. Leslie Mountford, D.D. ' 



Cedarville, Ohio 1948 
Columbus, Ohio 1948 



Synod of Illinois 

The Rev. J. P. Lytle, D.D. 
The Rev. J. E. Simpson, D.D. 



West Allis, Wis. 1948 
Oak Park, 111. 1948 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 9 

Synod of Iowa ^'J^l^^ 

The Rev. R. A. Foster Keokuk, Iowa 1948 

The Rev. J. Dallas Gibson, Jr. ... . Tarkio, Mo. 1949 

Synod of Kansas 
The Rev. James L. Cottrell . . . . . . Tulsa, Okla. 1948 

Synod of Nebraska 

The Rev. Roy P. Morris Murray, Nebr. 1948 

Synod of California 

The Rev. Paul E. Carson, D.D. . . . Los Angeles, Calif. 1948 

Synod of the Columbia 

The Rev. E. D. McKune Nampa, Idaho 1947 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

The Rev. J. Kenneth Miller, M.A., D.D., President 
The Rev^ Roy E. Grace, Th.M., Vice President 
The Rev. James T. Vorhis, Th.M., D.D., Secretary 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

The Executive Committee 

The Rev. W. F. Rotzler, D.D., Chairman 

The Rev. James T. Vorhis, Th.M., D.D., Secretary 

The Rev. R. W. Gibson, D.D. 

Mr. Frank H. Davis 

Mr. Albert B. McClester 

The Rev. Don P. Montgomery, D.D. 

The Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D. 

The Committee on Beneficiary Funds 

The Seminary Faculty 



HONORARY DIRECTORS 

The Rev. J. Walter Liggitt, D.D. 
The Rev. W. E. McCulloch, D.D. 
The Rev. T. N. McQuoro, D.D. 
The Rev. W. L. C. Samson, D.D. 
The Rev. J. A. Thompson, D.D., LL.D. 
The Rev. C. H. Watson, D.D., LL.D. 



10 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES Term 

Expires 

Robert Fisher, Esq. ...... Indiana, Pa. 1947 

Mr. T. J. Gillespie, Jr Pittsburgh, Pa. 1947 

J. M. Lashly, Esq., LL.D St. Louis, Mo. 1947 

The Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D. . . ' . Pittsburgh, Pa. 1947 

Mr. Joseph A. Dickey Pittsburgh, Pa. 1948 

The Rev. S. C. Gamble, D.D SHppery Rock, Pa. 1948 

The Hon. W. H. McNaugher .... Pittsburgh, Pa. 1948 

George M. Swan, Esq Pittsburgh, Pa. 1948 

Mr. Frank H. Davis Pittsburgh, Pa. 1949 

The Rev. Charles W. Fulton, D.D. . . . Pittsburgh, Pa. 1949 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

The Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D., President 
George M. Swan, Esq., Vice President 
Mr. M. J. Hein, Secretary and Treasurer 



STANDING COMMITTEES 
The Committee on Finance 

The Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D., Chairman 
Mr. T. J. Gillespie, Jr. 
Mr. Frank H. Davis 

The Committee on Seminary Premises 

Mr. Frank H. Davis, Chairman 
The Rev. Charles W. Fulton, D.D. 

The Purchasing Committee 

Mr. Joseph A. Dickey, Chairman 
The Rev. George A. Long, D.D. 



DORMITORY COMMITTEE 

Mrs. Robert P. Rhodes, Chairman 

Miss Eleanor Gillespie 

Miss Alice Gray 

Mrs. J. L. Kelso 

Mrs. W. H, Ochiltree 

Mrs. Chalmers T. Siviter 

Mrs. a. H. Trimble 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 11 



THE FACULTY 



The Rev. George Anderson Long, D.D., President 
Professor of English Bible 

7135 Reynolds Street, Pittsburgh 8, Pa. 

The Rev. Robert McNary Karr, D.D., Registrar 
Professor of Systematic and Biblical Theology 

236 Hilands Avenue, Ben Avon, Pittsburgh 2, Pa. 

The Rev. James Leon Kelso, Th.D., D.D. 

Professor of Semitics and Biblical Archaeology 

129 Altadena Drive, Mt. Lebanon, Pittsburgh 16, Pa. 

The Rev. Albert Henry Baldinger, D.D. 

Professor of Practical Theology 

41 Penshurst Road, Ben Avon Heights, Pittsburgh 2, Pa. 

The Rev. Clarence Joseph Williamson, D.D., Secretary 
Professor of Church History and Government 
405 South Braddock Ave., Pittsburgh 21, Pa. 

The Rev. Theophilus Mills Taylor, D.D. 

Professor, the John McNaugher Chair 

of New Testament Literature and Exegesis 

1009 Norwood Avenue, Ben Avon Heights, Pittsburgh 2, Pa. 

The Rev. Addison Hardie Leitch, Ph.D., D.D. 

Professor of Philosophy of Religion and Religious Education 
616 West North Avenue, Pittsburgh 12, Pa. 

The Rev. H. Ray Shear, D.D. 

Professor elect, Practical Theology 

616 West North Ave., Pittsburgh 12, Pa. 

Professor Albert Thornton Cordray, Ph.D. 

Instructor in Public Speaking 
New Wilmington, Pa. 



Miss Dorothy J. Vorhis, A.B., B.S. in L.S. 

Librarian 



12 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

The Credentials Committee 

Dr. Kjvrr Dr. Leitch 

The Curriculum Committee 

The Faculty 

The Library Committee 

Dr. Taylor Dr. Leitch 

The Devotional Committee 

Dr. Williamson Dr. Baldinger Dr. Shear 

The Committee on Field Work and Placement 

Dr. Baldinger Dr. Shear Dr. Williamson 

The Press Committee 

Dr. Kelso Dr. Williamson 

The Catalogue Committee 

Dr. Karr Dr. Baldinger 

Graduate Studies Committee 

Dr. Taylor Dr. Leitch Dr. Kelso 



EMERITUS PROFESSORS 

The Rev. John McNaugher, D.D., LL.D., Litt.D., President Emeritus 
Emeritus Professor of New Testament Literature and Exegesis 
321 Lafayette Avenue, Pittsburgh 14, Pa. 

The Rev. William Riley Wilson, D.D., LL.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Pastoral Theology and Homiletics 
328 Dalzell Avenue, Ben Avon, Pittsburgh 2, Pa. 

The Rev. Jesse Johnson, D.D., LL.D. 
Emeritus Professor of Church History 

62 West Norwich Ave., Columbus, Ohio 

The Rev. George Boone McCreary, Ph.D., D.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Philosophy of Religion and Religious Education 
777 Berkeley Ave., Claremont, Calif. 

The Rev. James Doig Rankin, D.D., LL.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Systematic and Biblical Theology 
715 South El Molino Avenue, Pasadena, Calif. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 13 



THE PURPOSE OF THE SEMINARY 



The purpose of the Seminary, as defined In the Constitution, 
is to instruct candidates for the gospel ministry, ordained ministers 
of the gospel, and such as may be preparing for other special lines 
of Christian service, in the knowledge of the doctrines of the 
Scriptures and the order and institutes of worship taught therein 
and summarily exhibited in the standards of the United Presbyte- 
rian Church of North America; to cherish in them the life of 
true godliness, and to cultivate the gifts v/hich Christ, the Head 
of the Church, confers on those whom He calls and ordains to the 
ministry, to the end that there may be raised up a succession of 
able, faithful, and godly ministers of the gospel and of other 
Christian workers. 



THE TERM AND COURSE OF STUDY 



The regular course of seminary training prescribed by the 
General Assembly covers a period of three academic years, each of 
which is divided into three terms. The annual session begins the 
second Wednesday of September, and continues thirty-five weeks 
including holidays. 

The Seminary course is built for college graduates, and 
presupposes a foundation of broad and liberal culture. In 
preparation for their professional training in the Seminary, college 
students should take substantial courses in the subjects indicated 
in the following recommended Pre-Seminary Studies. 



14 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



PRE-SEMINARY STUDIES 

The American Association of Theological Schools, at its 

twelfth biennial meeting, Lexington, Ky., June, 1940, adopted a 

Statement regarding Pre-Seminary Studies and authorized it to be 

sent to all colleges and universities in the United States and 

Canada. The statement includes the following specifications as to 

the proper fields of study, and the minimum number of semester 

hours: 

Semester 
Fields Hours 

English (Composition and Literature).™ _ 8'12 

Bible or Religion ^ „ _ „ _ ™ 4'6 

Philosophy (At least two of the following: Introduction to philosophy, 
History of philosophy. Ethics, Logic) ~ _ _ ~~ 4'6 

History , 4'6 

Psychology 2'3 

A foreign language (At least one of the following: Latin, Greek, 
Hebrew, French, German) „ 12'16 

Natural sciences (Physical or biological) _ — 4'6 

Social sciences (At least two of the following: Economics, Sociology, 
Government or political science, Social psychology, Education) 4'6 

Concentration of work or 'majoring', is a common practice in colleges. For 
such concentration or major, a constructive sequence based upon any one, 
two, or three of the above fields of study would lead up naturally to a 
theological course. 

With the addition of a substantial course in Speech, and of 
12-16 semester hours in Elementary Greek, with the emphasis 
upon vocabularly, grammar and syntax, the Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Seminary has endorsed the foregoing Statement of Pre-Seminary 
Studies, and urges all college students who are looking forward 
to the Gospel ministry to make use of this Statement in the 
shaping of their college course (in consultation with their advisors 
at college), so that they may not only secure the desired college 
degree but at the same time secure the best possible preparation 
for seminary work. 

The Statement of Pre-Seminary Studies does not purport to 
be in itself a complete four-year college course, but rather calls 
attention to those fields and courses of study which are accessible 
to all college students and which are of basic importance in 
preparation for seminary training. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary IS 

The Statement is not yet mandatory, but it indicates the 
trend in seminary circles. The Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary will 
use this Pre-Seminary Statement of Studies as a standard by 
which to judge the preparedness of applicants for admission. 

Those who have notable deficiencies, especially in Philosophy 
and Greek, will be required to remove them. All new registrants 
will be required to take a placement examination in New Testa- 
ment Greek, regardless of the amount of collegiate Greek credits 
presented for entrance. This placement examination is based 
upon the vocabulary of the Johannine literature and the grammar 
covered in Machen's Nezv Testament Greek for Beginners. Those 
failing to pass the examination with a minimum grade of 75 will 
be placed in appropriate classes in Elementary Greek which are 
offered for the convenience of those who are partially or totally 
deficient in Greek. Adequate preparation is prerequisite to New 
Testament Exegesis. 

PRE-THEOLOGICAL MAJOR 

Students in Colleges of Agriculture, who have it in mind to 
prepare for ministering to rural churches, may not find it entirely 
practicable to follow the Pre-Seminary Studies outlined above. 
In such case, and with a view to the most effective rural ministry, 
we recommend that in their college days they follow the Pre- 
Theological Major suggested by the Conference on Relation- 
ships between Colleges of Agriculture and Theological Seminaries, 
held at Purdue University, Nov. 6, 1940. The suggested Pre- 
Theological Major is as follows: 

"At least one basic course (three semester hours) in each of the following 
fields: 

Agricultural Economics 

Economics 

English Composition, 2 courses (6 semester hours) 

English Literature (preferably 2 courses) 

History or Government (preferably 2 courses) 

Philosophy 

Public Speaking 

Psychology 

Rural Sociology 

Sociology 

"In addition the student would fulfill the minimum requirements of the 
College of Agriculture, which include Science (usually Biology and Chemistry). 

"Recommended Electives : 
Education 
Foreign Language 

"Undergraduate courses in religion are not required in the suggested major, 
as these cannot be offered in state-supported institutions." 



16 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



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The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



17 



ELECTIVE COURSES 

The following Elective Courses are available to qualified undergraduates 
(ordinarily MIddlers and Seniors), and also to students in the Graduate Department, 
who may apply them toward their degree in the fields indicated. (See page 34.) 



Course 



Quarter 
Hours 



Fields 



113. Inter'Testament History 


. 3 




X 






ISO. 0. T. Canon and Text (given with No. 250) V/z 


X 


X 






151, 152. Hebrew Exegesis . . (each) 


3 


X 








153. Hebrew Critical Paper 


. 3 


X 








155. Geography of Bible Lands 


3 


X 




X 


X 


157. Archaeology of Palestine 


3 


X 








158. Seminar in Archaeology 


3 


X 








160. Current Trends in 0. T. Criticism 


3 


X 








250. N. T. Canon and Textual Criticism 


. V/l 


X 


X 






253. Greek Critical Paper .... 


. 3 


X 








254. Readings in the Koine Papyri 


3 


X 








25?. Exegetical Seminar 


. 3 


X 








260. The Church and Its Art . . . 


3 


X 


X 


X 


X 


261. Critical Introd. to the Pauline Epistles 


3 


X 








262. Recent Developments in Synoptic Criticisnr 


1 3 


X 








263. Critical Introd. to the Johannlne Writing 


3 3 


X 








264. History of the Christian Liturgy 


. 3 


X 


X 




X 


26?. Research in New Testament 


. 3 


X 








350. The Parables of Jesus .... 


3 


X 


X 




X 


351. Jeremiah ...... 


. 3 


X 






X 


352. The Gospel According to John 


3 


X 


X 




X 


450. Comparative Religion 


3 




X 


X 


X 


451. The Early American Church 


1 




X 






453. American Church Biography 


3 




X 






454. History of Doctrine .... 


3 




X 


X 


X 


455. Bible Characters .... 


3 


X 


X 




X 


550. Doctrinal Thesis .... 


3 




X 






551. The Teaching of Jesus 


3 


X 


X 


X 


X 


558. The Means of Grace 


3 




X 


X 


X 


560. The Doctrine of Last Things 


3 




X 






651. Psychology of Religion 


3 




X 


X 


X 


652. Organization and Admin, in Educa. Program 


s 3 






X 


X 


653. Methods of Religious Teaching 


3 






X 


X 


656. Problems in Modern Christian Thought 


3 




X 


X 


X 


750. Seminar in Sermon Composition 


3 








X 


751. Preaching from the Old Testament 


3 








X 


752. Preaching in the First Five Centuries 


3 




X 


X 


X 


754. Ezekiel and Daniel .... 


3 


X 






X 


851, 852. Public Speakmg . . . (each) 


1 






X 


X 


854. Preparation for Public Speaking 


3 






X 


X 



Total 



69 



52 



38 



62 



18 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



SEMITICS AND BIBLICAL ARCHAEOLOGY 
Dr. Kelso 

The aim of this department is to give the student an appreciation and 
an understanding of the Old Testament. To that end courses are offered (1) 
in the Hebrew language and its peculiar thought techniques, (2) in the Arch' 
aeology of the ancient Near East, (3) in the detailed History of the Hebrew 
people, and (4) in the Old Testament Theology as contrasted with the hea' 
then religions of those days. Seminar courses studying the latest books 
and magazine articles teach the student how he can evaluate and use new 
materials when he gets into the pastorate. An excellent Bible Lands Museum 
serves as a class room in this department. 

Ill, 112. Old Testament History. A study of the political and religious 
history of the Hebrew people from the days of Abraham to the close of the 
Old Testament, with special emphasis on the more significant personalities, 
events and institutions. The results of archaeological research are studied 
in conjunction with the Biblical record. 

Juniors, fall and winter, 3 quarter hours credit each term. 

113. Inter-Testament History. A resume of the Persian and Greek 
periods in Palestine, and a detailed study of the Maccabaean and Roman 
periods, so as to give the student a broad background for the New Testament 
study. The Apocrypha is studied in detail. 

Elective, Juniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

123. Hebrew Language. A practical course in the Hebrew language 
designed to achieve the following objective: to familiarize the student with a 
working vocabulary of the language and the essential features of its gram- 
mar. A text with lectures and written exercises. 

Middlers, fall term, 6 recitations a week, 4 quarter hours credit. 

124a, b. Hebrew Reading. A course in the accurate translation and inter' 
pretation of Biblical Hebrew designed to show the wealth of sermonic ma' 
terial in the original Hebrew. Selected Psalms and historical passages. 

Middlers, winter and spring, 3 quarter hours credit each term. 

132. Old Testament Theology. A detailed study of the major doctrines 
of the Old Testament, with a quick survey of the historical progress of 
Revelation in the light of contemporary civilizations and religions. 

Seniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

150. Old Testament Canon and Text. History of the formation of the 
Hebrew Canon, with emphasis upon the rejection of the Apocrypha. A 
brief history of the Hebrew text and the major versions. 

Elective, l|/2 quarter hours credit. (Given with No. 2?0). 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 19 



151, 152. Hebrew Exegesis. Practice in acquiring the principles of Old 
Testament exegesis, not only from the linguistic field, but also from the 
archaeological source material. The more difficult Hebrew passages with 
rich sermonic possibilities are used. 

Elective, Seniors, 3 quarter hours credit for each course. 

153. Hebrew Critical. In order to enable the students to meet the 
requirements of their respective presbyteries in connection with ordination, 
provision is made for each Senior to present a critical paper on the Hebrew 
text of an assigned passage from the Old Testament. There will be individ' 
ual conferences by appointment for reports of progress, during the first 
week of each month of the term. Papers will be due on the last day pre' 
ceding examinations. 

Elective, Seniors, fall or winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

155. Geography of Bible Lands. A survey course covering the major 
features of all ancient geography which influenced Biblical history, and a 
detailed study of Palestinian geography and its relation to Old Testament 
history and the customs and manners of its peoples. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

157. Archaeology of Palestine. A rapid historical survey of archaeological 
work in Bible lands, with particular attention to the cultural and religious 
life of the Israelite and non'Israehte populations in Palestine. Methods of 
archaeological research and the interpretation of findings are studied, not 
only for apologetic purposes, but especially for the exegetical study of the 
Scriptures. Assigned readings, slides and materials from the Bible lands 
museum. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

158. Seminar in Archaeology. The period of the Exodus and Conquest. 
A research course in which the student becomes acquainted not only with all 
available historical and archaeological source materials, but also with the 
proper methods of presenting his conclusions in such a fashion that they 
will be helpful to the average church member. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

160. Current Trends in Old Testament Criticism. A course designed to 
train students in the evaluation of new books and technical magazine articles 
in all fields of Old Testament research. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



20 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



NEW TESTAMENT LITERATURE AND EXEGESIS 
Dr. Taylor 

The work in this department is centered in the history, literature and 
interpretation of our Primary Source, the New Testament. The aim through' 
out is to impress upon the student the uniqueness of Christianity and its 
Textbook; and to make the study of the New Testament both inspirational 
and practical, looking toward the future pastoral and homiletical work of 
the student. Each student is expected to read, at one sitting, each of the 
New Testament books in its entirety during the period when it is under class' 
room consideration. These readings will follow the text of the Revised 
Standard Version. Repeated readings are advised. The student may use the 
Greek text of Tischendorf (VIII Edition), Westcott and Hort, or Nestle (16th 
Edition, 1936) in the exegetical and critical work. (Except as otherwise 
indicated, courses are given by the professor in charge). 

211. Elementary Greek. New students who are not properly qualified for 
work in New Testament Exegesis are required to study the elements of the 
Greek language. A suitable text is used, and special attention is given to 
vocabulary, verbal forms and syntax. 

Juniors (J^), fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

212a. Elementary Greek. Grammar and syntax continued. 
Juniors (J^), winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

212b. Elementary Greek. Portions of the Gospel according to John and 
of the Catholic Epistles are read critically in the Greek with the aid of 
Green's Grammar. 

Juniors (J^), spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

213. Greek Reading. Readings in the New Testament, with grammar re 
view and drill. This course is designed for those students who have had some 
Greek but who need additional study and practice in order to gain that prO' 
ficiency in language which is demanded by the exegetical courses. 

Juniors (J^), fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Leitch. 

214. Greek Reading. A continuation of course No. 213. (Credit given, 
but not applicable on two semesters required Exegesis). 

Juniors (J^), winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Leitch. 

215. Biblical Interpretation, (a) The Oriental Mind: Jesus was an Ori' 
ental, Who ministered and preached to Orientals. Adequate interpretation 
of Scripture, therefore, demands an understanding of Oriental, and particularly 
Semitic, psychology and logic. A study is made of them, using the Scrip' 
tures and contemporary literature, together with experiences from modern 
Oriental life, for documentation. Lectures, readings, and discussion, (b) 
Hermeneutics proper: A review of the history of interpretation in the Church, 
with a determination of the principles of sound exegesis as exemplified in the 
grammatico'historical method. Lectures and discussion. 

Juniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

221. New Testament Introduction, (a) New Testament World: The his' 
torical setting in which the New Testament appeared, — old Greek religion, 
later Hellenistic mystery religions, Hellenisticjudaism and the Jewish sects. 
(b) The Gospels and Acts: Introduction and survey. Synoptic and Johan' 
nine problems, LukcActs and apostolic history. Textbook, lectures and 
required readings. 

Middlers, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 21 



222. New Testament Introduction, (a) Pauline Epistles: Historical, lit' 
erary and critical study with a survey of the text, (b) General Epistles: 
Introduction and survey. (c) Apocalypse: Introduction and survey. A 
sympathetic review of the various schools of interpretation. 

Middlers, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

241. New Testament Greek Exegesis. Epistle to the Romans: A re' 
view of the principles of Hermeneutics, followed by a critical study of the 
Greek text in application of these principles. The first few chapters are 
dealt with illustratively by lectures, followed by a general class assignment, 
the remainder of the term being given over to individual assignments. 
Lectures, collateral readings, reports and discussions. 

Middlers and qualified Juniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

242. New Testament Greek Exegesis. Epistle to the Hebrews: Contin' 
uation of the report and discussion method. (See Course No. 241 above). 

Middlers and qualified Juniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

250. New Testament Canon and Textual Criticism, (a) The Canon: A 
study of the formation of the New Testament. The limiting principle of 
the Canon and the consequent rejection of apocryphal and pseudepigraph' 
ical works. The position of the Roman Church, of the Church of 
England, and of the Presbyterian and Reformed bodies as shown in the West' 
minster Confession. Lectures and required readings. (b) Textual Criti' 
cism: A survey of the history of the printed text, with an introduction to 
the apparatus criticus and the principles of textual criticism. An appraisal 
of the Tischendorf, Nestle, and Westcott and Hort texts. Textbook, 
lectures and required readings. 

Elective, V/z quarter hours credit. (Given with No. 150). 

253. Greek Critical. In order to enable the students to meet the re' 
quirements of their respective presbyteries in connection with ordination, 
provision is made for each senior to present a critical paper on the Greek 
text of an assigned passage from the New Testament. There will be a 
minimum of three individual conferences by appointment, scheduled during 
the term for each registrant. Papers are due on the last Friday before 
the examinations of the term. 

Elective, Seniors, fall or winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

254. Readings in the Koine Papyri. An advanced course dealing with 
the non'literary papyri discovered within recent years. Their bearing upon 
our understanding of New Testament words and phrases. The aim is to 
provide a broader knowledge of First Century thought for a fuller and more 
accurate interpretation of the New Testament. 

Elective, for advanced students, 3 quarter hours credit. 

255. Exegetical Seminar. For the advanced Greek student especially 
interested in Exegesis. A choice of research problems in exegesis is permit' 
ted each student. Reports for round'table discussion. A summary written 
paper is presented in lieu of a final examination. 

Elective, Seniors and qualified Middlers, 3 quarter hours credit. 

260. The Church and Its Art. (a) The Origin and Development of the 
Church Edifice, traced through the various architectural periods from the 
diaspora synagogues to the present, showing the different lines of influence. 
A discussion of architectural styles adaptable and suitable to the requirements 
of the American Church today. Illustrated lectures, readings and discussions. 
(b) Christian Art and Symbolism: A survey of Christian graphic and plastic 
art through the centuries. The importance of symbolism to the early Chris' 
tians, and its place in the Church's art today. Illustrated lectures, readings 
and discussions. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



22 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



261. Critical Introduction to the Pauline Epistles. A rapid survey of 
Paul's life on the basis of a synthesis of the records in Acts and the Epistles. 
The origin and completion of the Corpus Paulinum. The groupings of 
the ten major epistles. Recent criticism of the authorship of II Thess., Col., 
Eph., and of the place of origin of the captivity correspondence. The prob' 
lems of Romans 16, and of the Pastorals. Sacramentalism, and other 
mystery features in Pauline theology. 

Elective, for advanced students, 3 quarter hours credit. 

262. Recent Developments in Synoptic Criticism. An introduction to 
formgeschichte, with a critical appraisal of its strong points and weaknesses, 
its possibilities and dangers. The possible permanent values which it may 
contribute in the field of New Testament study. An adequate working 
knowledge of Greek is required. 

Elective, for advanced students, 3 quarter hours credit. 

263. Critical Introduction to the Johannine Writings. An appraisal of 
recent criticism as to the unity of the Fourth Gospel and the so-called 
epistles, and as to the relationship of the Apocalypse to the Johannine group, 
dealing with the differences in grammar, vocabulary and thought'concepts. 
The Apocalypse in the field of apocalyptics. Antagonism toward it among 
the early Fathers and among the Reformers. 

Elective, for advanced students, 3 quarter hours credit. 

264. History of the Christian Liturgy. The liturgy of the Church traced 
from the prcChristian synagogue through the period of development to the 
crystalli2;ation of the Roman rite in the time of Gregory III. Special study 
of the origins of the Ante'Communion (Proanaphora) and of the Commuu' 
ion (Anaphora), and of their early association. The development of the 
Canonical Hours. Sources: I Clement, Ignatian Epistles, Didache, Justin's 
First Apology, Canons of Hyppolytus, and The Apostolic Constitutions. 

Elective, Seniors and Graduates, 3 quarter hours credit. 

265. Research in the New Testament. Directed research along various 
lines as indicated by the student's needs. 

Elective, Graduate Students, 3 quarter hours credit. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 23 

ENGLISH BIBLE 
Dr. Long 



It is the aim of this department to provide, in close co-operation with 
other departments, a careful study of the content of the English Bible. 
Courses are designed so that, in connection with the Old Testament and New 
Testament departments, opportunity is given to the student to study, either 
in the original language or in English, every book of the Bible, with a view 
to securing not only a knowledge of the authorship, critical questions and 
historical background, but also a knowledge of the Scripture itself. 



311. The Gospels. There will be literary and historical study of the 
Gospels, covering their general features, a survey of their content and the 
relation of the Synoptics to the Fourth Gospel. Critical questions in con- 
nection with the Gospels will be studied in Course No. 221. 

Juniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



312. The Life of Christ. The life of Christ will be studied on the basis 
of the materials contained in the Gospels, — His birth, baptism, temptation, 
self'consciousness, teachings, miraculous activity, crucifixion, resurrection 
and ascension. 

Juniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



322. The Poetical Books. This course is designed to provide (a) a general 
introduction to the poetry and wisdom writings of the ancient Hebrews; (b) 
a comprehensive survey of the Psalter; and (c) an analysis of Job, Eccle' 
siastes and the Song of Songs. 

Middlers, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



331. The Eighth Century Prophets. There will be (a) a general survey 
of prophetism in Israel, its origin and development from earliest times to the 
time of the canonical prophets; (b) historical introduction to the Prophets 
of the Eighth Century, B.C.; and (c) a detailed study of Amos, Hosea, 
Micah and Isaiah. Attention will be given to the social ethics of these 
prophecies and their bearings on contemporary life. 

Seniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Leitch. 



332. The Later Prophets. The course includes a study of the historical 
introduction to and the contents of the writings of the prophets who ap' 
peared in the critical years of the late seventh century B.C., and in the re' 
construction period following the exile. Attention will be given to the un' 
usual literary features, exegetical studies of outstanding passages, and the 
permanent values of the teachings of these prophets. 

Seniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Leitch. 



24 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



350. The Parables of Jesus. A careful study of the incomparable para- 
bles of our Lord, which occupied so large a place in His teaching. Attention 
will be given to their meaning for our Lord's hearers, and to their teaching 
for our own day. Homiletic values will be thoroughly reviewed. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

351. Jeremiah. This course is a careful study of the life and work of this 
great prophet. Attention is given to the prophecy in the light of contempor- 
ary history and especially to the contribution made to the central message of 
the Bible. Its relevance for our day and its homiletical values are considered. 

Elective, Seniors and Graduates, 3 quarter hours credit. 

352. The Gospel According to John. An intensive study of the content 
of this Gospel. While some attention is given to questions of introduction, 
the central emphasis is on the purpose, the message, and the contribution it 
makes to our interpretation of Christ. Homiletic values are specifically 
considered. 

Elective, Seniors and Graduates, 3 quarter hours credit. 



Courses in English Bible in Other Departments 

111, 112. Old Testament History. 

Juniors, 3 quarter hours credit for each course. Dr. Kelso 

113. Inter-Testament History. 

Elective, Juniors, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Kelso 

221, 222. New Testament Introduction. 

Middlers, 3 quarter hours credit for each course. Dr. Taylor 

455. Bible Characters. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Williamson 

551. The Teaching of Jesus. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Karr 

751. Preaching from the Old Testament. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Shear 

754. Ezekiel and Daniel. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Shear 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 25 

CHURCH HISTORY 
Dr. Williamson 



411. Church History, Apostolic and Andetit. From the apostolic age 
to the barbarian invasions. The Council of Jerusalem; the early Church, the 
conflicts with heathenism and heresy, doctrinal controversies; the growth of 
ritual and discipline; great church leaders. 

Juniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



412. Mediaeval Church History. Barbarian invasions; growth in influ' 
ence of the papacy; Mohammedanism; the Holy Roman Empire; the Crusades; 
monastic orders; universities; Scholasticism; Mysticism; the Renaissance. 

Juniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



422. Modem Church History. The Reformation in different countries; 
the Counter'Reformation; the Puritans; the Pietists; American churches and 
their European antecedents, their origins, leaders and influence. 

Juniors, spring term, 4 quarter hours credit. 



431. Religious Movements in America. Revivalism; anti'Christian cults: 
Christian Science, Russellism, Mormonism, Spiritualism, etc. The Group 
movements. Great American preachers. 

Seniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



432. Christian Missions. A survey of the progress of missions from the 
Apostolic days, with special emphasis on the modern missionary movement, 
beginning with William Carey. An examination of the principal mission 
fields, including those of the United Presbyterian Church. Missions in 
America. Lives of outstanding missionaries in various fields. The problems, 
methods, and opportunities of mission work. Methods of missionary in- 
struction in congregations. 

Seniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



434. Church Government. Discussion method. Principles and forms 
of church government; government and discipline of the United Presbytc 
rian Church; church courts; practical workings of church law. 

Seniors, fall term, l|/2 quarter hours credit. 



450. Comparative Religion. An outline of the history, beliefs, literature 
and practices of the non'Christian religions, with special emphasis on Moham- 
medanism, Hinduism, and Buddhism. Elements of strength and of weakness 
in non'Christian faiths. Complete superiority of the Christian religion. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



26 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



451. The Early American Church. The European background of the 
American churches. The Puritans and Pilgrims. Persecution of Quakers, 
Baptists, etc. Roger Williams and reHgious liberty. Relation of the Church 
to the developing life of the different colonies. Liberal tendencies and re- 
ligious diversities. The Great Awakening. The War of the Revolution and 
its effect on religious life. Nationalization of the churches in the United 
States. Missionary work at home and abroad. 

Elective, 1 quarter hour credit. 

453. American Church Biography. Lives and contemporary influence of 
outstanding ministers of America from colonial times to the present. Their 
methods and outstanding points of effectiveness. Great Christian laymen in 
different denominations. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

454. History of Doctrine. Influence of the Greek philosophers on Chris' 
tian thought. Christian apologetics. Development of Christology. History 
of anthropology, soteriology, eschatology, and symbols of the Church. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

455. Bible Characters. A study of many of the men and women of the 
Bible, some prominent and some obscure; an examination of their charac 
ter and the part they played for or against the plan of God; their inspiration 
or warning for today. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 27 

SYSTEMATIC AND BIBLICAL THEOLOGY 
Dr. Karr 

The aim of this department is to get the student well grounded in the 
doctrines of our evangelical faith. The method includes assigned readings, 
lectures, notebook work and class'room discussion. The subject is taken up in 
the following order, the first few lessons serving the purpose of orientation. 

512. Systematic Theology. (a) Introduction to Theology: the idea, 
purpose and importance of Theology; the source of material; the requisites 
to successful study; preview of the doctrinal system, (b) Revelation: the 
possibility and probability of special Revelation, the claims of Scripture, 
the credibility of the writers, various evidences of the supernatural character 
of the Bible, (c) The Inspiration of the Scriptures, as held by our Church, 
set forth and defended. 

Juniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

521. Systematic Theology, (a) The Doctrine of God: the attributes of 
the Divine Being; the tri'personality of God; the decrees and works of God, 
— creation, preservation and providence, (b) The Doctrine of Angels: their 
nature and employments. 

Middlers, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

522. Systematic Theology, (a) The Doctrine of Man: the origin and 
primitive state of man; the unity of the human race; essentials of the moral 
and spiritual nature, (b) The Doctrine of Sin: the Fall of man; the nature 
and universality of sin; the consequences of sin to mankind. 

Middlers, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

531. Systematic Theology, (a) The Doctrine of Christ the Redeemer: 
the preparation for redemption; the person of Christ, His two natures and 
states; the offices and work of Christ, with special study of the Atonement. 
(b) The Doctrine of the Holy Spirit: the application of redemption, — 
election, caUing, regeneration, conversion, union with Christ, justification, 
adoption, sanctification. 

Seniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

532. Systematic Theology, (a) The Doctrine of the Church: its na' 
ture, membership, purpose and power; the sacraments of Baptism and the 
Lord's Supper, (b) The Doctrine of Last Things: death, the intermediate 
state, the second coming of Christ, the resurrection, the judgment and final 
awards. 

Seniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

550. Doctrinal Thesis. In order to enable students to meet the require 
ments of their respective presbyteries in connection with ordination, pro- 
vision is made for the preparation of a Doctrinal Thesis. This involves 
intensive study in a well'defined field. In determining the subject, the 
student's preference is considered but his choice must have the approval 
of the department. Periodic reports of progress are required. The com- 
pleted manuscript is due on the day preceding term examinations. 

Elective, Middlers, spring term; or, Seniors, fall term; 3 quarter hours credit. 



28 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



551. The Teaching of Jesus. A Biblical and inductive study. Source 
material is found in the Gospel record. The aim is to interpret and sys' 
tematize the teaching of the Master, especially concerning Himself. There 
will be classToom lectures, and assigned subjects for inductive study. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

558. The Means of Grace. A Biblical and practical study. In the light 
of Scripture and experience, the Church and its ordinances, — the Word, 
Sacraments, and Prayer, — are studied with a view to a fresh appraisal of their 
value in nurturing and developing the spiritual life and in furthering Christ's 
cause upon earth. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

559. Trends in Theology. A historical and critical review of the principal 
doctrinal variations which have appeared in the past, with appropriate 
emphasis on developments from the beginning of the nineteenth century. 
In this department, such material is preferably distributed under the various 
doctrinal heads and is used primarily as the historical approach to the study 
of the several main doctrines. Thus each main doctrine serves as the inte' 
grating center, while the historical material furnishes the necessary back' 
ground for the positive presentation and enhances its value. For the more 
particular study of theological systems as systems, and of the present day 
problems growing out of them, the student is referred to Elective Courses, 
No. 454, History of Doctrine, and No. 656, Problems in Modern Christian 
Thought. 

560. The Doctrine of Last Things. A study in Systematic Theology for 
advanced students dealing with physical deaths the intermediate state, the 
second coming of Christ, the resurrection of the dead, the final judgment 
and the Kingdom of Glory. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 29 

PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION AND RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

Dr. Leitch 

613. Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion. A study of special value 
for those who have had little or no philosophical training. The history of 
human thought is studied with the special emphasis on those periods when 
philosophy touches on religion or when philosophy and reHgion cross on com' 
mon issues. 

Juniors with inadequate philosophical background, spring term, 3 quarter 
hours credit. 

621. Christian Education. A course designed to give background for the 
modern approach to religious education. After a study of religious education 
in Biblical times and in the history of the Christian Church, attention is cen' 
tered on problems within the modern church. 

Middlers, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

631. Philosophy of Religion. An introduction to the major philosophical 
problems as they stand in relation to the claims of the Ohristian Faith. 
Special attention is given to the problem of the Christian Religion as a 
philosophical system. 

Seniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

633. Apologetics. The development and defense of Christianity, in which 
a survey is made of the old arguments against the Christian faith and the 
classical defenses which have been built up across the centuries. Special inter' 
est centers on the modern apologia for our faith. 

Seniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

651. Psychology of Religion. A study of the principles of psychology as 
related to religious experience. After a brief review of the general field of 
psychology, attention is given to the special psychological problems of re 
ligion, such as mysticism, conversion, prayer, emotionalism, adolescence, 
worship, etc. Positively, the course aims toward the construction of a ma' 
ture and integrated religious experience. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

652. Organization and Administration in Educational Programs. A com' 
prehensive study of the principles and methods of educational organization 
and administration as they may be applied to specific congregational prob' 
lems. Study is made of the daily vacation Bible School, the problem of 
week'day religious education in various public school systems, and the guid' 
ance by the pastor of the church school in his own church. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

653. Methods of Religious Teaching. Educational methods as applicable 
to church situations. The general educational methods examined critically 
for purposes of use in the special problems of the church school. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

656. Problems in Modem Christian Thought. The aim of this course is 
to indicate the chief intellectual difi^iculties which confront the spread of the 
gospel in our day. This course is used as a means for bringing before the 
student the leading thinkers of the day, and their contributions to the criticism 
or establishment of the Christian faith. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



30 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



PRACTICAL THEOLOGY 
Dr. Shear 

711, 712. Homiletics. A basic course dealing with the planning, prepara' 
tion and delivery of sermons. The meaning and importance of preaching, 
the sources of material, the types of sermons, the choice of themes and texts, 
the sermon outline, the literary style, the methods of delivery — are some 
of the matters to be dealt with. Students are required to submit weekly for 
class criticism outlines of sermons on assigned texts, and to prepare in full 
one sermon for pulpit delivery before the Faculty. 

Juniors, fall and winter terms, 3 quarter hours credit each term. 



721. Homiletics. Emphasis is placed in this course on expository preach' 
ing in the New Testament. The student is expected to submit for appraisal 
(a) weekly outlines of sermons on assigned texts, (b) reports on sermons by 
representative preachers in the several periods of church history, (c) two fully 
written sermons on texts chosen by the student from an assigned book of 
the New Testament, (d) two fully written sermons on themes to be chosen 
by the student from a designated list of texts. 

Middlers, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



731. Pastoral Theology. This course introduces the student to the office 
and work of a pastor of a congregation. It deals, through lectures and dis' 
cussions, with the personality of the minister and his relations to the congrc 
gation, the community and the denomination. The student will read and sub' 
mit reviews of two books chosen from a designated list. 

Middlers, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



732. Pastoral Theology. A comprehensive course of lectures and discus' 
sions touching every phase of the pastoral relationship. It will deal with 
the pastor as a devout and humble servant of Jesus Christ, as a leader of 
public worship, as an administrator of the sacraments, as conductor of wed' 
dings and funerals, as director of Christian education, as evangelist, as mis' 
sionary leader, as organizer and administrator of church activities, as per' 
sonal counselor and visitor in homes and hospitals, as citizen in the community 
and nation. The Secretary of the Board of Administration will present a 
series of lectures dealing with the pastor's relations to the organized work 
of the denomination. 

Seniors, winter term, 4 quarter hours credit. 



750. Seminar in Sermon Composition. A course for advanced students 
who desire more training in the composition of sermons. Special attention 
will be given to richness of vocabulary, literary style, imaginative thought 
and use of illustration. Students submit their manuscripts for group dis' 
cussion. 

Elective, open only to advanced students who have had all required courses 
in homiletics, 3 quarter hours credit. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 31 



751. Preaching from the Old Testament. The Scriptures which Jesus 
knew and of which he said, "They are they that bear witness of me," are 
rich mines of sermon suggestion and material. This course aims to offer 
suggestions as to themes and their development in all parts of the Old Testa' 
ment, historical, poetical and prophetical. Lectures will be supplemented 
by collateral reading and by the writing of sermons on assigned texts by 
the students. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



752. Preaching in the First Five Centuries. A study of the doctrinal and 
ethical content, the literary style, the homiletic method and the spiritual 
background of preaching in the early centuries from the days of the apostles 
to the break-up of the Roman Empire. Largely a reading course with class 
discussions. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. (Not offered in 1947'48). 



754. Ezekiel and Daniel. A study of the text, the exilic background and 
the post'exilic influence of Ezekiel. Problems presented by recent criticism 
are noted. Special attention is given to the symbolism and apocalyptic 
visions of Daniel in the light of history. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



32 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



Chapel Preaching 

Each student in the course of his work at the Seminary is required to 
preach three sermons (one each year) before the Faculty and student body. 
Texts or topics are assigned, and the sermons are criticized and graded on 
the basis of content, style and delivery. 



Field Work 
Six Units Required for Graduation 

A. Junior students are assigned to local churches under the direction of 
the respective pastors. The purpose is to give the student direct contact with, 
and practical experience in, the organizational activities of the church. The 
work to which students are assigned varies, depending upon local conditions 
and upon the student's capacity and adaptability. Ordinarily it consists of 
teaching, visiting, working with young people, supervising boys' groups, and 
assisting in the service of music and in the conduct of public worship. The 
student worker receives a minimum of $80.00 for the school year, together 
with necessary expenses, from the church he serves. Seminars, based on 
reports from the students and the fields, are conducted from time to time, 
as occasion requires. Two units toward graduation are given for satisfactory 
work in this field. 

B. For the four additional units in field work the student is required to 
spend the summer following the Middle Year (or the equivalent of four 
months), in a home mission station, or as a student pastor of a vacant congre' 
gation, or as a student assistant to a regular pastorate. This work is under 
the joint supervision of the Secretary of the Board of American Missions, the 
Synodical Superintendent of Missions, and the Department of Practical 
Theology of the Seminary. The student will receive a minimum of $100.00 
per month, plus traveling expenses to and from his field. 

C. Middle and Senior students who, for one reason or another, wish to 
engage in extra'curricular field work during the school year, must secure 
special permission from the Faculty. No credit toward graduation will be 
given for this work, except by special action of the Faculty. 

D. Students of other denominations, in order to receive credit for similarly 
supervised field work in which they may engage, must explain the nature 
of such work to the Department of Practical Theology and secure the ap' 
proval of the Faculty. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 33 



PUBLIC SPEAKING 

Dr. Cordray 

The purpose of this department is to assist each student to increase his 
effectiveness in pubHc address and oral reading. Speech training is required 
of each student throughout the Junior year, or until sufficient ability is shown 
to enable him to discharge the speech responsibilities of a student preacher 
satisfactorily. 

The services of this department are available to all students needing special 
help with speech problems, especially in preparing for the delivery of sermons 
before the Faculty and student body. 

A high'fidelity transcription is made of each chapel sermon for pur' 
poses of reference and study. 

811. Public Speaking. Review of fundamental principles of speech com' 
position and delivery, with frequent classroom performances, criticized by 
instructor and class. Exercises in voice production and articulation, with 
individual drills as needed. Each student makes and studies a record of 
his speech. 

Juniors, fall term, 1 quarter hour credit. 

812. Public Speaking. Continuation of voice and articulation exercises 
as required. Practice in the delivery of sermon excerpts, both original and 
selected. Emphasis is placed upon preparation for the delivery of Junior 
chapel sermons, each student being required to appear for criticism one week 
in advance of his chapel preaching. 

Juniors, v/inter term, 1 quarter hour credit. 

813. Public Speaking. Study of interpretative reading, particularly of 
Scripture. Introduction to microphone speaking. 

Juniors, spring term, 1 quarter hour credit. 

851. Public Speaking. A course offering speech instruction adapted to 
individual needs and interests. 

Elective, 1 quarter hour credit. 

852. Public Speakiiig. Similar to Course No. 8?!. 
Elective, 1 quarter hour credit. 

854. Preparation for Public Speaking. Organization and clarifying of 
material; methods of improving voice and enunciation; public reading of 
the Bible; after'dinner speaking; extemporaneous addresses, etc. This course 
is only auxiliary to the work of this department. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Williamson 



Special Announcement 



During the year 1947-1948, under the auspices of the Board 
of American Missions, a series of special lectures on problems in 
the field of Home Missions will be delivered by outstanding 
authorities. 



34 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



THE DEPARTMENT OF GRADUATE STUDIES 

The Degree offered: The degree of Master of Theology 
(Th.M.) is granted to those candidates who fulfill the necessary- 
requirements, as listed below. This is an earned professional 
degree indicating advanced study and proficiency in theological 
subjects. 

Entrance Requirements: Every applicant for admission to 
the Graduate Department must make application on the form pro- 
vided for that purpose, and must present the following credentials: 
(1) A letter from the clerk of his presbytery, or corresponding 
church officer, indicating that he is a member in good standing of 
some evangelical church and is officially recommended as a student 
of theology; (2) complete official transcripts of academic credits 
beyond high school, including evidence that he holds (a) the A.B. 
degree, or an equivalent degree, from an accredited college or uni- 
versity, and (b) the B.D. degree, or an equivalent degree, from this 
or some other accredited seminary or theological school; (3) sat- 
isfactory testimonials from at least three references in response 
to the Seminary's questionnaire. One or more of these require- 
ments may be waived in cases where adequate information is al- 
ready on file In the Seminary. Acceptance as a bona fide Grad- 
uate Student will be determined by the Faculty's Graduate Studies 
Committee on the basis of complete and satisfactory credentials. 

Fields of Study: At the Initiation of his graduate work, the 
student must indicate the field in which he expects to do his 
major work. The following four fields are determined: (For 
available courses, see page 17.) 

I. Biblical Literature and Interpretation. 
II. History of Church and Doctrine. 
III. Christian Education and Philosophy. 
IV. Practical Theology and Administration. 

Graduation Requirements: A total of 34 quarter hour credits 
Is required for the Master's degree, 27 credits being allowed for 
the required class room work and 7 credits for an acceptable 
thesis. Of the 27 hours of classroom work, 18 quarter hours must 
be taken in the student's major field. The remaining 9 quarter 
hours may be elected by the student in any of the other fields. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 35 

The class work calls for a minimum of one academic year of three 
quarters, of not less than 9 quarter hours each. The equivalent 
hours may be spread out, but the total period involved must not 
exceed three academic years except by special action of the Grad- 
uate Studies Committee of the Faculty. 

The required thesis is to be written upon some phase of the 
work in the student's major field. The subject of the thesis 
must be approved by the professor under whom the student is do- 
ing his major work, and must be delivered to the Graduate Stu- 
ies Committee at least two calendar months prior to- the com- 
mencement at which the student expects to receive his degree. The 
requirements for the format of the thesis may be had from the 
student's major professor. 

Credits Transferable from other Schools: Credits for graduate 
courses taken in other theological schools or seminaries are trans- 
ferable toward the Th.M. degree, subject to the final approval of 
the Graduate Studies Committee in each individual instance; 
but such transferred credits cannot exceed 9 quarter hours in 
value. It is in all cases necessary, therefore, that a minimum of 
25 quarter hours be earned in residence. 

Time Limit: Under normal conditions, and except by special 
action of the Graduate Studies Committee to the contrary, all 
work for the degree inclusive of the thesis must be completed 
within four calendar years from the date of the student's matricu- 
lation in the Graduate Department. 

Expenses: Students will, of course, be expected to purchase 
any textbooks which their professors may require. 

The following fees and tuitions are charged to graduate 
students, both as candidates for degrees, and as auditors in the 
seminary: 

(1) Graduate Matriculation Fee, payable upon 
entrance ....... ^ 5.00 

(2) Regular Tuition Fee, payable upon registration 
for each quarter as follows: 

(a) For 3 courses (9 quarter hours) . . 10.00 

(b) For 2 courses (6 quarter hours) . . 8.00 

(c) For 1 course (3 quarter hours) . . 5.00 



36 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



(3) Diploma Fee, payable 15 days prior to grant- 
ing the degree ...... 5.00 

Note: Graduate fees, excepting the diploma fee, are ap- 
plied in building up the Graduate Section of the Library, and 
in the purchase of other Graduate Department supplies and equip- 
ment. 

Communications: Additional Information relative to the 
work of the Graduate Department, together with forms for Ap- 
plication for Admission, may be secured by addressing: 

The Department of Graduate Studies 

The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 

616 West North Avenue, Pittsburgh 12, Pa. 

SUMMER INSTITUTES OF THEOLOGY 

During the summer of 1946 two Institutes of Theology were 
inaugurated under the auspices of the Seminary working in co- 
operation with the Department of War Work of the Board of 
Christian Education. The first of these Institutes was held on 
the campus of Westminster College, New Wilmington, Pa., during 
the week of June 10-15, while the second took place at Monmouth 
College, Monmouth,- 111., July 1-6. Both Institutes received a 
warm welcome from the Church's regular ministry and chaplaincy. 
It was highly gratifying that nineteen of the Church's chaplains 
were able to be in attendance at New Wilmington, with a slightly 
smaller number present at Monmouth. 

The Institutes will be available to our ministers and chap- 
lains again in 1947, at New Wilmington, June 9-13, and at Mon- 
mouth, July 7-11. Nationally recognized Christian leaders will 
again augment the regular Faculty of the Seminary On the teach- 
ing staffs of both Institutes. 

In the pleasant atmosphere of shady college campuses, with 
lodging in comfortable dormitory quarters, an ideal minister's- 
recreational week is provided at a nominal cost. Here he renews 
old friendships vv'ith college and seminary classmates. Here he is 
inspired to renewed efforts by fresh Bible study in which his 
thoughts are led by experienced and recognized scholars. Here 
he finds mental and spiritual stimulation as he comes to grips with 
the problems facing the Church in our day. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 37 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



ADMISSION 



Registration for the Fall Term. Tuesday, September 9, 1947, 
is set aside for the registration of all new students. Wednesday 
morning is reserved for the registration of all regular students 
in the Middle and Senior classes. Students having any irregulari- 
ties in their standing or schedule should in every case arrange 
to be seen by special appointment. It is important that students 
come for registration at the times designated. In case of late 
registration, a fee of one dollar is required, and the period during 
which late registration is permitted is limited to ten days from the 
beginning of each quarter. 

Normal Time for Entrance. The normal time to enter the 
Seminary is at the opening of the annual session in September. 
The regular program of training begins at this time, and exhibits 
the maximum values when taken in proper educational sequence. 

Credentials. Every applicant for admission to the Seminary 
must present satisfactory credentials of his suitableness as a can- 
didate for the ministry or other contemplated form of Christian 
service. These credentials include (1) a letter of introduction 
from his pastor or session certifying that he Is a member in good 
standing of some evangelical church; (2) a letter from the clerk 
of his presbytery, or corresponding church officer. Indicating that 
he has been taken under proper ecclesiastical supervision and 
is officially recommended as a student of theology; and (3) evi- 
dence of full collegiate preparation, including an official transcript 
of his college credits. 

Declaration of Purpose. Before being admitted to the privi- 
leges of the Seminary, every student shall, in the presence of the 
Registrar, subscribe a declaration to the effect that while he is a 
student in the Seminary he will regularly, punctually, and diligently 



38 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



attend upon all the instructions of the professors, that he will 
promptly comply with the lawful requisitions of the Faculty and 
be subject to their authority, that he will honestly conform to all 
regulations of the Seminary, and that he will not propagate any 
opinions in opposition to the standards of the United Presbyterian 
Church. 

Entrance Deposit. From the moment of entrance, students are 
regarded as stewards of the Church's property, having special 
responsibility in connection with the free use of library and dormi- 
tory equipment. Each student, upon matriculation, is required to 
make a deposit of $5.00, which is returnable at the end of the 
Seminary course, less the insurance premium and any other nec- 
essary deductions. (See page 47.) 

A Matriculation Fee of $5.00 is required of each new student. 

CLASSIFICATION 

Regular Degree Students. Applicants for admission as 
students in full standing to take the prescribed course in prepara- 
tion for the Degree of B.D. must have a bachelor's degree from a 
standard college or university, the degree having been secured 
without duplication of credit. 

Part-Time Students. Students who are not so situated" that 
they can devote full time to Seminary work may be admitted by 
the Faculty to take such courses as their time permits In prepara- 
tion for some form of Christian service. But they must have the 
same academic preparation, and furnish the same credentials, as 
are required of Regular Degree Students. 

Classification by Years. Students who register for the full 
course are, for practical purposes, classified normally as Juniors 
during their first academic year, as Middlers during their second 
year, and as Seniors during their third year. 

Transferred Students. Persons qualified for admission to the 
Seminary, who have successfully completed partial courses in some 
other school of theology accredited by the American Association 
of Theological Schools, may be admitted by the Faculty to corres- 
ponding standing in this institution upon the presentation of 
satisfactory credentials, which should include (1) a certificate of 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 39 



good standing and honorable dismission, and (2) a complete 
official transcript of their credits. Students transferring from non- 
accredited seminaries will be admitted only on probation. 

THE STUDENT'S SCHEDULE 

The Norm. Students adequately prepared, and able to give 
full time to Seminary work, are expected to follow the regular 
schedule, involving 16 credit hours a week throughout the entire 
Seminary course. 

Extra-curricular Work. No student shall take academic work 
in excess of the norm, without special permission from the Faculty. 
A record of scholarly work is pre-requisite to the granting of such 
permission. Moreover, without special permission from the Fac- 
ulty, which will not be granted unless the case be strictly excep- 
tional, no student shall assume responsibility for a congregation 
as pastor or as stated supply. 

Limitations. Students having outside work of any kind in- 
volving heavy demands upon their time will be limited to such 
courses as they can carry satisfactorily. And those who, for any 
reason, fail to do a satisfactory grade of work in their scheduled 
studies will also be subject to limitation by the Faculty. 

The Minimum. Students must carry at least 12 hours of con- 
current Seminary work in order to be entitled to the privileges of 
the dormitory. 

Registration each Quarter. At the beginning of each quarter 
every student shall file with the Registrar a complete list of his 
studies, together with a memorandum of all his outside work, 
actual and proposed. When his schedule of studies has been ap- 
proved, no change may be made by the student without consulting 
the Registrar. 

ATTENDANCE 

Regular and prompt attendance is indispensable to satisfac- 
tory work. All absence, or even tardiness, for whatever reason, 
has an injurious effect on the student's standing and progress. 
Absence immediately preceding or immediately following any 
holiday period is charged double against the student's record. 
Excuses for absence must be presented in writing, to the profess- 
ors concerned, immediately upon return to class work; and shall 
specify date, classes missed, and cause of absence. 



40 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



EXAMINATIONS 

In order to test the student's progress in the various depart- 
ments, written examinations are held at the close of each quarter. 
From these examinations and the classroom work, the term grades 
of the student are determined. Seventy per cent, is required as a 
passing grade in every subject. A report of the student's attend- 
ance and credits is made to his presbytery, or corresponding 
church body, at the close of each quarter, 

GRADUATION: REQUIREMENTS AND AWARDS 

General Requirements. In order to graduate, a student must 
successfully complete the regular three-year course of prescribed 
and elective studies amounting to 144 quarter hours, together with 
six units of field work. At least one year of work in residence 
is required for graduation. 

The Degree of B.D. The Diploma of the Seminary with the 
Degree of Bachelor of Divinity is conferred only upon Degree 
Students who complete the regular course in a manner satisfactory 
to the Faculty and who display at least average ability in every 
department. 

Graduation Fee. A fee of $5.00 is charged to cover the cost 
of Diploma. This fee is due the 15th of the month preceding 
graduation. 

Graduation Honors. The honor, Cum Laude, is granted to all 
who throughout the Seminary course are clearly distinguished 
(1) for academic attainments, (2) for regular and punctual at- 
tendance, and (3) for general fitness for the gospel ministry. 
The honor. Magna Cum Laude, is granted to all who possess these 
qualifications in an unusual degree; and, Summa Cum Laude, in 
very rare instance, in recognition of superlative merit. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 41 



FACILITIES FOR STUDY 



THE SEMINARY LIBRARY 

The Library is a very important feature of the Seminary. 
Here the student finds the tools with which much of his work as 
a minister will be done. It is important that he familiarize himself 
with the best. 

The Seminary Library comprising over 40,000 volumes is 
adequately housed within the Seminary building. The library 
facilities were completely renovated and modernized when the 
Pittsburgh and Xenia Seminaries were merged in 1930. The Main 
Reference Room, immediately to the left as one enters the build- 
ing, was furnished with the most up-to-date equipment by the 
Sixth United Presbyterian Church of Pittsburgh as an expression 
of its continuing Interest in the Seminary. Significant panels, in 
which the artist has portrayed the historic Insignia of the older 
Presbyterian and Reformed Churches of the world, decorate the 
upper walls of the room, reminding the student of his ecclesias- 
tical heritage. There is also the Periodical Room where the finest 
current magazines of popular and general Christian interest are 
to be found, while the more technical theological and Biblical 
journals are available in the Main Reference Room. There are 
also ample stack rooms with steel shelving and a commodious 
vault for rare and historic books and documents. 

An Increasingly large Investment in both new and older out- 
of-print books Is being made by the Seminary each year. A 
Booklist of the year's accessions is published annually in May. 
Gifts of both books and money from the many friends of the 
Seminary are received annually and are very greatly appreciated. 

The Newburgh Collection 
The research department of the Library contains the now 
priceless collection of classic theological works, many of which 
date from the early days of printing and from the Reformation, 
which were secured abroad by the Rev. John M. Mason, D.D., In 
connection with the founding of the Seminary of New York, after- 
wards the Newburgh Seminary. 

The James Law Library Fund 
Through the liberality of the late James Law, Esq., of Shus- 
han, N. Y., there was conveyed to the Seminary several years ago 
the sum of ^15,000, to be employed as a library endowment. The 
interest from this sum augments annual purchases. 



42 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 

The Nina S. Brittain Collection 

Through the generosity of Frank J. Brittain, Esq., of Erie, 
Pennsylvania, the sum of $5,000 is to be used over a period of 
years for the direct purchase of theological and related works. These 
books are known as the Nina S. Brittain Collection. 

Library Hours 

The Library is open week days to all, without restriction of 
creed, subject to the same rules as those which apply to students. 
The hours are 9 A.M. to 1 P.M., and 2 to 5:30 P.M., excepting 
Saturday when the closing hour is 12 noon. When the Seminary 
is in session the Library is also open evenings, Monday through 
Friday, from 7 to 10 P.M. 

THE BIBLE LANDS MUSEUM 

The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary is one of the 
most active seminaries in the world engaged in archaeological 
research of Bible times in ancient Palestine. In conjunction with 
the American School of Oriental Research at Jerusalem, it has 
conducted explorations at Sodom and Gomorrah in 1924, excava- 
tions at Kirjath-Sepher in 1926, 1928, 1930, 1932, and excava- 
tions at Bethel in 1934. 

This work was inaugurated by the late Dr. M. G. Kyle, 
formerly Professor of Biblical Archaeology, who served as presi- 
dent of all these expeditions with the exception of the last: it 
was conducted after his death as a memorial to his work in 
Palestinian archaeology. The share of these antiquities which 
the Palestinian Archaeological Museum has allotted to the Semi- 
nary has been shipped to Pittsburgh, where more than a thousand 
of these objects are now on exhibit. Numerous other valuable 
pieces are awaiting special preparation before being placed on 
exhibition. 

These objects all illustrate in the most striking way the life 
of the people of Bible Lands, and so become of great value for 
interpretation as well as for apologetics. They illumine and 
corroborate the Biblical narratives. Thus an ineffaceable impres- 
sion is made upon the student of the trustworthiness of the Biblical 
record, for only real events leave anything to be dug up out of the 
ground. The objects in the Museum are used constantly in the 
classes of the Seminary. Opportunity is also afforded the public 
to visit the Museum at appointed times. 

Special gifts of archaeological specimens are being constantly 
added to the Museum through Interested friends. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 43 



CULTURAL ADVANTAGES 



THE DENOMINATIONAL SEMINARY 

The denominational Seminary has peculiar advantages. Being 
under direct church control, it certifies its graduates as trained by 
thoroughly responsible teachers. The established standards are 
maintained, and approved educational methods are followed. 
Without dwarfing individuality, the church school gives to its 
graduates the unique stamp which wins recognition within denomi- 
national bounds. At the same time, the commingling of students 
from various evangelical bodies tends to develop in students mu- 
tual understanding and brotherly regard. The wide range of ac- 
quaintance with the Church and its leaders secured by attendance 
at the Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary is for the young minister an 
asset of great value. 

A METROPOLITAN ENVIRONMENT 

Pittsburgh has numerous elements of cultural value, chief 
among which are her schools and churches. The church life of our 
own and other denominations in Pittsburgh is of the best. The city 
and its environs, including more than eighty of our own congrega- 
tions, afford an excellent example of the Church at work. In all 
the denominations the religious thought is conservative and the 
methods of work progressive. The pulpits are well manned and 
the work generally well organized. Some of the ablest preachers 
of our own and other churches are located here. The student has 
opportunity to study the methods of men who are widely known 
as successful ministers. He may see mission work carried on along 
improved lines, and engage in it himself. He may study at first 
hand the most effective methods of Sabbath-school work. He is 
welcomed to the weekly meetings of the local ministerial unions, 
where live problems and issues are the subjects of discussion. 

Pittsburgh, together with the contiguous towns, is one of the 
great commercial centers of the world. It affords unexcelled oppor- 
tunities for the study of social, economical, political, racial, and 
other problems. It is in itself an education to live and work in such 
a city and catch the pulse of its busy life. Moreover, the benefit 
of contact with those engaged in the varied forms of work for social, 
moral and religious betterment, and of personal experience in such 



44 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



efforts, is evident to all. As the future ministers to persons socially 
environed, theological students should give themselves all conven- 
ient advantages to study mankind in their varied social relation- 
ships. 

AFFILIATION WITH THE UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 

Graduates from the three-year course of Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Theological Seminary who desire to take the A.M. degree at the 
University of Pittsburgh in the field of Religion and Religious 
Education may transfer as many as 14 semester credits (equiva- 
lent to 21 quarter hours) from the Seminary as advanced standing 
toward this degree. The remaining ten course credits and six 
thesis credits required for the A.M. degree must be taken at the 
University of Pittsburgh. A part of the ten course credits may 
be taken in other fields of the University than Religion and Re- 
ligious Education. 

Graduates of Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary will be 
allowed a maximum of 30 graduate credits (equivalent to 45 
quarter hours) as advanced standing toward the Ph.D. degree in 
Religion and Religious Education. An additional amount of 
six graduate credits may be granted to students taking courses 
at the Seminary beyond the regular three-year theological course, 
in which cases the courses must be agreed upon by the Graduate 
School of the University of Pittsburgh. 

The University of Pittsburgh will accept graduate credits from 
Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary in the fields of Biblical 
Literature, Church History, Theology, History and Philosophy of 
Religion, and Religious Education. 

The amount of advanced graduate standing granted to Semi- 
nary students who choose to do their major work at the University 
in fields other than Religion and Religious Education will be de- 
termined by heads of these departments. The advanced standing 
for both the A.M. and Ph.D. degree will vary some with depart- 
ments and students. 

A regular summer session or semester must elapse between the 
time of the student's graduation from the Seminary and the con- 
ferring of a graduate degree by the University of Pittsburgh. 

The procedure outlined in the foregoing paragraphs became 
effective February, 1933. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 45 



THE ALLEGHENY OBSERVATORY 

The Observatory is one of the oldest astronomical institutions 
in the country. It is affiliated with the University of Pittsburgh, 
but is located in Riverview Park, one of the highest points in 
Allegheny County. By special arrangements with the Director, 
the students of the Seminary have free access to it and the privilege 
of observing the heavens through its famous lenses. The stellar 
photographs are thrown on the screen, and these and the instru- 
ments and their workings explained to the students. 



THE BUHL PLANETARIUM 

Of the five planetaria in America, Pittsburgh now claims the 
finest and most up-to-date. Provided by the Buhl Foundation at 
a cost of over a million dollars, the Buhl Planetarium and Institute 
of Popular Science is located between the Post Office and the 
Carnegie Library, North Side, within a few minutes walk of the 
Seminary. Its most distinctive feature Is the Theatre of the Stars 
under the large dome which crowns the building. Here, by means 
of the intricate Zeiss projector, the lecturer can give to 450 visitors 
at once a realistic view of the heavens as they appear from any 
part of the earth at any time. In addition to the central auditor- 
ium, there are six galleries for scientific exhibits In which the 
various achievements of science are vividly set forth. A lecture 
hall, seating 250, has modern equipment for sound-motion pic- 
tures, lantern slides and demonstration experiments. Four well- 
equipped work rooms are provided for the Amateur Astronomers' 
Association of Pittsburgh. Fall, winter, and spring short-term 
evening classes In science are offered for laymen. High School 
Science Demonstration Lectures, the School Science Fair, Eighth 
Grade Conducted Tours, and the Congress for science students, 
are some of the school activities provided by the Planetarium. 
Mr. Arthur L. Draper Is the Director of this unique institution 
of education and culture. 



46 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



LIFE AT THE SEMINARY 



THE SEMINARY BUILDING 

The Seminary hall is located at the corner of North Avenue 
and Buena Vista Street, and overlooks West Park. On the first 
floor are the Mary J. Stevenson Reception Room, the President's 
Office, the Pressly Chapel, the Library, the Reference and Reading 
Rooms, and the Gymnasium. On the second floor are the Faculty 
Conference Room, the Bible Lands Museum, and five class rooms 
of ample proportions. The third, fourth and fifth floors are 
given over to dormitory uses. The dining room and kitchen are 
on the fifth floor. 



ROOMS AND ACCOMMODATIONS 

The dormitory rooms are arranged as follows: there are single 
rooms; suites of double rooms, in which two men occupy a study 
and a bedroom in common; and suites of three rooms, in which 
two men have a study in common and two single bedrooms ad- 
joining. There is a trunk room on the third floor. Each floor has 
bathrooms and lavatories. The Seminary provides furniture and 
bedding, including sheets, pillow cases, and one blanket for each 
bed. Students should bring extra blankets for their own use. 
Students will also furnish towels for their own use and provide 
for the laundering of these. All other dormitory laundry work 
will be looked after by the Seminary. 

With the purpose of contributing to the comfort and health 
of the students, the oversight and maintenance of the rooms in the 
dormitory are placed in charge of a Committee of women appointed 
by the Board of Directors. Rooms are inspected from time to 
time. The ordinary supervision and control of the dormitory 
is committed to the President's Secretary. 

Rooms are provided free of charge to students who take not 
less than twelve hours of concurrent Seminary work. Upper 
classmen who desire an exchange of rooms must make application 
therefor, in writing, to the Secretary of the President. New stu- 
dents will have choice of the rooms not retained by upper class- 
men, according to the order in which their written applications 
have been received. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 47 



APARTMENTS FOR MARRIED STUDENTS 

The fifth floor of the Seminary building contains several 
two and three-room apartments which are available at a nominal 
charge to married students without children. Heat and light are 
supplied, but there are no individual cooking facilities. Men and 
their wives are, therefore, required to take their meals with the 
Student Eating Club which is located on the same floor. 

For men with children, the large stone dwelling immediately 
adjacent to the Seminary on North Avenue is now available. This 
building, the old Boggs mansion, has been completely remodeled 
into an apartment structure in which the Seminary provides house- 
keeping accommodations for six families at a nominal rental. 

Prospective students may request that their names be placed 
upon the waiting list for either type of apartment, by addressing 
the Secretary to the President. 



GROUP INSURANCE 

Unmarried students in the dormitory and married students 
occupying Seminary apartments are protected against personal 
loss by fire in the amount of $300 and $500 respectively. A 
premium of $1.50 per single student and $2.25 per married stu- 
dent covers the cost for three years. This item is included in the 
Entrance Deposit. 

THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF THE SEMINARY 

Adequate provision is made for the maintenance and develop- 
ment of the religious life. In addition to the private devotions of 
the men, there are various gatherings for social worship. Daily 
chapel services are held under the direction of the Faculty. A 
Seminary Communion Service is held in the Pressly Chapel soon 
after the opening of the session in the fall; and a similar service, 
especially for the Senior Class, is held during commencement week. 
The Day of Prayer for Educational Institutions is observed each 
year with appropriate exercises. "Family worship" is conducted 
by the students daily after the evening meal, and members 
of the student body take their turn in leading Chapel devotions 
in connection with their Chapel preaching service. The local 



48 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



group of volunteers for the mission fields does much to keep 
alive and active the missionary spirit. 

During a recent year, the students, of their own volition and at 
their own expense, fitted up an attractive Worship Room in the 
building, as a place of quiet retirement for religious meditation, 
and where worship is held every week-night at 10 o'clock. 

THE SOCIAL LIFE OF THE SEMINARY 

A social hour under the auspices of the Women's Dormitory 
Committee follows the Chapel service on the opening day of the 
Seminary year. Soon after the opening of the session, the Student 
Association arranges a reception for the new students. This is 
usually held in one of the local churches. Other social affairs are 
held at the option of the students during the year. For general 
social purposes there is a room set aside in the Seminary. The 
different congregations of the city invite the students to come to 
their socials and share their hospitality. 

THE WEBSTER MEMORIAL FORUM 

The Webster Memorial Forum is a student organization 
which meets at stated times for the discussion of pre-arranged 
subjects. It usually has a speaker whose address is correlated 
with open discussion. The organization originated in a desire on 
the part of the students for a closer fellowship between the student 
body and the Faculty. Dr. John Hunter Webster, formerly Profes- 
sor of New Testament Language and Literature, was asked to 
sponsor this Forum. After his death in 1933, the organization 
called itself the "Webster Memorial Forum" in honor of the one 
who had given substantial help to the students in their initial 
problems and discussions. 

MUSICAL OPPORTUNITY 

The Praise Service of the Church has long been a profound 
interest of the United Presbyterians. Pittsburgh is one of the 
major musical centers of America, having its own famed Symphony 
Orchestra, and such singing groups as the Mendelssohn Choir, 
the Bach Choir, and the Opera Society. Seminary students who 
can pass entrance tests have been singing in these organizations 
for many years. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 49 



Varying with the numbers and gifts of students in attendance, 
there has been a Chorus of Seminary men who sing for their own 
pleasure and development, and have presented programs to our 
local churches. 

A library of several hundred musical classics for male voices 
is available for singing groups. 



PHYSICAL CULTURE 

In the fall and spring, outdoor sports hold first place. The 
city tennis courts in the park, two minutes walk from the Seminary, 
may be used. The Seminary gymnasium provides additional 
opportunity for physical training. 

The Allegheny Y. M. C. A. is located beside the Seminary. 
With its splendid physical equipment, — gymnasium, bowling 
alleys, showers, and swimming pool, — it offers a fine opportunity 
to the men of the Seminary, all of whom have free membership 
in it. Provision is made for a variety of games. A physical 
examination is required of all who use the "Y" facilities. 



EXPENSES 

There is no charge for the use of dormitory rooms; but stu- 
dents who elect private lodgings must meet their own rental 
expenses. 

A dining room, located on the fifth floor of the dormitory, 
offers student board at cost. Although much of the equipment 
has been provided by the Seminary, the dining room is under the 
administration of the student body, and is practically self-sup- 
porting. With a view to the proper maintenance of equipment 
and its gradual replacement as that becomes necessary, the Club 
is accumulating a special fund, known as the sinking fund, to 
which each member contributes ^3.00 a year. A limited number 
of students receive their board in compensation for their services 
as waiters. An initial deposit of $30.00 is required of each stu- 
dent to defray the bills of the first period. Each bill is for a 
four-week period. The average weekly cost throughout the year is 



50 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



approximately $7.50 for a week of five and one-half days. The 
cost of food over the week ends is included in the estimate below. 
All men rooming in the building are required to take their meals 
in the Seminary dining hall. 

The Board of Christian Education of the United Presbyterian 
Church, through its retail department, the United Presbyterian 
Book Store, furnishes all text books at a reduction of twenty per 
cent; other books at a reduction of ten per cent. The Board also 
grants reasonable credit to students under presbyterial super- 
vision, where they are unable to make immediate payment. 



*Matriculation Fee 
*Entrance Deposit 
*Diploma Fee (Seniors) 
*Cap & Gown (Seniors 
Student Association Fee 



Student Expenses 

^5.00 Books & Sup. (max. est.) $100.00 

S.OO Board (est.) . . . 300.00 

5.00 Laundry (est.) . . . 70.00 

S.OO Care Fare (est.) . . . 70.00 

4.00 Incidentals (est.) . . 50.00 



(* Items starred are required only once; all others represent annual expenses). 



Self-Support and Student Aid 

All Students for the ministry are urged and encouraged to 
maintain a maximum degree of financial independence. Self- 
reliance, rather than the expectation of special favors, is held up 
as the norm throughout life for ministers of the Gospel as well 
as other members of society. However, for those students who 
find it impossible to finance all of their Seminary course, the 
following opportunities are available: 



The Board of Education Aid 

The General Assembly authorizes the presbyteries to recom- 
mend worthy students for grants from the Board of Education. 
The maximum authorized for 1946-1947 was as follows: $130 to 
students of the first year, $120 to second-year students, and $90 
to third-year students. These grants are made only to students 
who attend the United Presbyterian Seminary. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 51 



Student Aid Fund 

There is a limited fund at the disposal of the Seminary for the 
assistance of needy students. This fund is provided for emergency 
cases only and is administered under the careful supervision of the 
Faculty. 

The Lesson of History 

It may be encouraging to students to know that we do not 
have in the history of either Seminary a record of any student who 
has been obliged to leave the Seminary for financial reasons. 

COMPETITIVE SCHOLARSHIPS 



The following competitive scholarships have been provided 
for the benefit of United Presbyterian students. In order to 
compete, contestants must carry not less than the regular quota of 
studies; they must complete each term's work satisfactorily, 
without any conditions or failures; and they must furthermore 
meet the particular requirements of the desired scholarship or prize 
as hereinafter specified. Under each scholarship an award is made 
once each year, at which time the Faculty considers all regular 
degree students who, during the preceding twelve months, have 
completed the necessary amount of work in a satisfactory manner. 

The James Purdy Scholarship 

There exists in the possession of the Seminary the Purdy Fund, 
bearing the name of its founder. The income, not to exceed $300, 
is apportioned equally each year to the six members of the Junior 
Class who attain the highest average of excellence in their Seminary 
work. The scholarship is subject to the conditions that no award 
be made to a student whose general average does not reach 85% 
or who receives a grade of less than 80% in any department, and 
that the entire Seminary course be finished at this Seminary. 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship 

In memory of the late Thomas Jamison, Esq., of the North 
Side, Pittsburgh, for many years a member of the Board of 
Trustees of the Seminary, Mrs. Jamison endowed a scholarship, 



52 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



the income of which, not to exceed $800, is given each year to the 
member of the Senior Class who attains the highest average of 
excellence in qualifications for the Christian ministry during the 
Junior and Middle years and the first term of the Senior year. 
In the matter of grades, his general average must reach 90%, 
and in no study must the grade be lower than 80%. The winner 
of this award must present to the Faculty within a reasonable 
time a thesis of not less than 10,000 words on a subject selected 
or approved by the Faculty. 

While this award is made without further conditions attached, 
it is the hope of the Faculty that each Jamison scholar will ap- 
preciate the importance of maintaining the Seminary's ideals and 
traditions of scholarship, and that he will use the award promptly 
in connection with a full session of graduate study in some insti- 
tution selected or approved by the Faculty, In this connection, he 
will be expected to make regular reports of the work he is doing 
and submit transcript of grades received. This scholarship af- 
fords a splendid opportunity to a worthy man each year for 
broadening his theological education and obtaining the rich cul- 
ture which comes with advanced study at the graduate level. 

The Jane Hogg Gardner Scholarship 

To the Senior student ranking second in qualifications for 
the ministry through the entire course, the Seminary awards the 
income of the Gardner bequest, not to exceed $200, but on condi- 
tion that there is no grade of less than 80% in any department, 
and that a satisfactory thesis of at least 5,000 words on an assigned 
subject be presented to the Faculty within a year from graduation. 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Foundation 

By bequest, in memory of her husband, the late Mrs. Hen- 
rietta M. Lee, of Oakmont Pa., established the "Robert A. 
Lee Church History Foundation," the annual income of which Is 
to be given to the Senior student who ranks first In the entire 
course In Church History. Candidates for this award must attend 
this Seminary from the beginning of their Junior year and re- 
ceive no grade less than 80% in any department. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 53 



THE STUDENT ASSOCIATION 

The Student Association is the official organization of the 
student body. Its constitution states that the purpose of the 
Association shall be to promote the spirit of unity, self-govern- 
ment, social and spiritual welfare of the students, and to main- 
tain a sympathetic understanding and close cooperation with 
the Faculty. The Student Board, the governing agency of the 
Association, is composed of the President of the Eating Club, 
the Secretary of the Preaching Association, a representative 
from each class, and a member at large. Dues of 50 cents a 
month are assessed to cover student activity. This association 
was formally organized in December, 1945. 



THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

All who have been enrolled as students of The Pittsburgh- 
Xenia Theological Seminary or its constituent institutions are en- 
titled to membership. The object of the Association is to cherish 
the memories of Seminary life, to maintain an active interest in 
Seminary affairs, and to promote the welfare of the Seminary and 
the Church. A business meeting, followed by a social hour and 
banquet, is held each year in connection with the Commencement 
Exercises. The business meeting is held in the First Church, 
North Side, Pittsburgh, at 4:00 P. M. of Commencement Day. At 
this time the Association elects officers to serve for the ensuing 
year. The business meeting is followed by a social hour culminat- 
ing in the Alumni Banquet at 5:30 P. M. Alumni and friends of 
the Seminary are urged to attend. 

Ail members are requested to send to the Seminary Library 
copies of such books, pamphlets and Important magazine articles 
as they may have published. 

The officers of the Alumni Association are: the Rev. Donald 
A. Spencer, D.D., President; the Rev. W. R. McMunn, D.D., Vice- 
President; the Rev. Roy L. Lash, D.D., Secretary-Treasurer. 



54 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



AWARDS GRANTED, 1945-1946 

Master of Theology, May 16, 1946 

William Hugh Brownlee ...... 

A.B., Sterling College, 1939 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1942 



Newton, Kans. 



Degree of Bachelor of Divinity 

Class of September, 1945 



Ellsworth Edwards Caylor 
A.B., Muskingum College, 
Allegheny Presbytery 



1943 



Robert Hamilton Clark 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1943 
Westmoreland Presbytery 

Herbert Holtz Flitton, Jr. 
A.B., Wheaton College, 1943 
Philadelphia Presbytery 

Donald William Jolly 

A.B., Chapman College, 1943 
Los Angeles Presbytery 

Walter Donald Kramer 

A.B., Bethany College, 1943 
Monongahela Presbytery 



Charles Harvey McClung, Jr. .... . 

A.B., Indiana Central College, 1943 
Indiana Presbytery 

Ray Alvin McCreight ...... 

A.B., Tarkio College, 1943 
College Springs Presbytery 

Robert Erwin McNeill ...... 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1943 

Presbytery of Shenango, Presbyterian Church, U.S.A. 

James Wilson Pollock ..... 
A.B., Monmouth College, 1945 
Allegheny Presbytery 

Howard Darius Rose 

A.B., Greenville College, 1940 

Oil City Conference, The Free Methodist Church 



Lawrence Wayne Stitt 

A.B., University of Michigan, 
Kiskiminetas Presbytery 



1943 



Roland Marshall Wilson 

A.B., Hampden-Sydney College, 
Hudson Presbytery 



1931 



Butler, Pa. 

Salineville, Ohio 

Baltimore, Md. 

Los Angeles, Calif. 

Mt. Lebanon, Pa, 

Vevay, Ind. 

Clearfield, Iowa 

New Castle, Pa. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Creighton, Pa. 

Vandergrift, Pa. 

Chase City, Va. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



55 



Class of May, 1946 

John Lawrence Ayers Ezel, Ky. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1944 
Muskingum Presbytery 

John Lincoln Clark New Waterford, Ohit> 

A.B., Baldwin-Wallace College, 1941 

North East Ohio Conference, The Methodist Church 

John Claude Gould, Jr Unity, Pa. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1945 
Westmoreland Presbytery 

Henry Holyoak Steubenville, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1943 

North East Ohio Conference, The Methodist Church 

Richard Eugene Johnson Ontario, Oregon 

B.S., Sterling College, 1944 
Idaho Presbytery 

George Loren Jones Pittsburg, Kans. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1943 
Kansas City Presbytery 

Harold Edgar Scott Sterling, Kans. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1944 
Oklahoma Presbytery 

Robert John Stahmer ....... Omaha, Nebr. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1944 
Nebraska Presbytery 

Scholarships and Prizes 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship (not to exceed $800) to Mr. Robert Henry 
Kempes. 

The Jane Hogg Gardner Scholarship (not to exceed $200) to Mr. Roland 
Marshall Wilson. 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Award to Mr. Richard Eugene Johnson. 

Graduation Honors: Cum Laude, to Mr. Richard Eugene Johnson, Mr. Harold 
Edgar Scott, and Mr. Roland Marshall Wilson. 

The James Purdy Scholarships (six in number, not to exceed $50 each) to the 
following Juniors: William Paul Cooke, Kenneth Virgil Kettlewell, John 
Leonard McCreight, Samuel Robb McLaughlin, Robert Harlan Meneilly, 
and Gerald Le Roy Selby. 



56 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 

REGISTER OF STUDENTS, 1946-1947 

Senior Class 

Candidates for Degree, September, 1946 

Malcolm Smith Alexander ..... Culver City, Calif. 
A.B., University of Southern California, 1933 
LL.B., University of Southern California Law School, 1936 
Los Angeles Presbytery 

Robert Mason Barnes ....... Akron, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1944 
Muskingum Presbytery 

James Isaiah Davis ....... Henderson, N. C. 

A.B., Knoxville College, 1944 
Tennessee Presbytery 

WiLLARD McCuLLocH MoRRis .... Colorado Springs, Colo. 
A.B., Sterling College, 1937 
Colorado Presbytery 

Candidates for Degree, May, 1947 

J. Rodney Beal Bellevue, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 194S 
Allegheny Presbytery 

Dale Edwin Brehmer Loveland, Colo. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1945 
Colorado Presbytery 

William Paul Cooke ....... Columbus, Ohio 

A.B., Texas Christian University, 194S 
Xenia Presbytery 

Ralph McGranahan Donaldson ..... Beaver, Pa. 
A.B., Westminster College, 1945 
Beaver Valley Presbytery 

Wesley Glenn Jones King Hill, Idaho 

A.B., College of Idaho, 1944 
Idaho Presbytery 

Robert Harlan Meneilly ...... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1945 
Monongahela Presbytery 

John Leonard McCreight New Concord, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1945 
Muskingum Presbytery 

Paul Morgan Musser . . . . . . Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio 

A.B., Westminster College, 1945 
Cleveland Presbytery 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



57 



*Kenneth Edward Rasmussen 
A.B., Sterling College, 1945 
Arkansas Valley Presbytery 



Candidates for Degree, December, 1947 



Jetmore, 'Kansas 



New Concord, Ohio 



Kenneth Virgil Kettlewell .... 
A.B., Muskingum College, 1945 
Muskingum Presbytery 

Gerald Le Roy Selby Benkelman, Nebr. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1946 
Arkansas Valley Presbytery 



Middle Class 

Entered in Summer, 1945 



*Samuel Robb McLaughlin 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1945 
Monmouth Presbytery 



Entered in Fall, 1945 



Cletus Valentine Baker . . . . . 

A.B., Tarkio College, 1945 
Illinois Southern Presbytery 

Warwick Wallace Hutchison . . . . 

A.B., Westminster College, 1946 
Monongahela Presbytery 

Entered in Winter, 1945-46 

Eugene Hoopes Ammon 

B.S., Sterling College, 1941 
Mercer Presbytery 

Robert Hall Mayo . . . . . , 
A.B., Monmouth College, 1942 
Allegheny Presbytery 

Frank William Montgomery .... 
A.B., Sterling College, 1940 
Kansas City Presbytery 

Entered in Spring, 1946 

Charles Raymond Graham .... 
A.B., Sterling College, 1942 
Xenia Presbytery 

Francis Bruce Johnston ..... 
A.B., Westminster College, 1941 
Mercer Presbytery 

Entered in Fall, 1946 

Ernest George Smith . . . . . 

A.B., Buena Vista College (la.), 1942 
Des Moines Presbytery 



New Concord, Ohio 

Percy, III. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

New Wilmington, Pa. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Topeka, Kansas 

Columbus, Ohio 
New Wilmington, Pa. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 



* Withdrew, October, 1946, for short term industrial missionary service in Sudan. 



58 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



Junior Class 

Joseph Harold Anderson ....... Butler, Pa. 

B.B.A., Westminster College, 1946 
Butler Presbytery 

Russell Allen Arthur ....'... Cambridge^ Ohio 
B.Sc, Ohio State University, 1941 
Muskingum Presbytery 

Kenneth Lloyd Beams ....... Oneonta, N. Y. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1938 
Delaware Presbytery 

Jay William Brewer Washington, Iowa 

B.S., Sterling College, 1944 
Keokuk Presbytery 

WiLLARD Kyle George ....... Youngstown, Ohio 

B.S., Westminster College, 1936 
Cleveland Presbytery 

Robert Lee Lanning, Jr. . . . ^ . . Noblestown, Pa. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1942 
Monongahela Presbytery 

Harvey Milton Luce ....... Collyer, Kans. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1946 
Kansas City Presbytery 

James Gardiner McConnell ..... Garden City, N. Y. 
A.B., Monmouth College, 1946 
Monongahela Presbytery 

Leonard Arden McCulloch ...... Lakewood, Ohio 

B.S., Monmouth College, 1939 
Cleveland Presbytery 

James Foster Reese ....... Harrodsburg, Ky. 

B.S., Knoxville College, 1946 
Tennessee Presbytery 

Paul Harvey Sutton ...... Drayton Plains, Mich. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1946 
Detroit Presbytery 

Peter Van Lierop . . . . . . . . Detroit, Mich. 

A.B, Hope College, 1946 
Detroit, Presbytery 

Part-Time Students 

Charles Elvin Jordan ....... Indianola, 111. 

B.S. in Agr., University of Illinois, 1939 
Lake Presbytery 

Russell Roy Lester ....... Grove City, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1947 
Butler Presbytery 

Earl Wilford Lighthall ...... Murrysville, Pa. 

A.B., Syracuse University, 1936 

Pittsburgh Conference, The Methodist Church 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 59 



Stephen Benjamin Malesick, Jr Brave, Pa. 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1946 

Pittsburgh Conference, The Methodist Church 

John Sampson Thompson ...... Piedmont, Ohio 

A.B., Asbury College, 1939 

B.D.jAsbury Theological Seminary, 1942 

North East Ohio Conference, The Methodist Church 

WiLMER Neil Thornburg ...... Monessen, Pa. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1945 
Kansas City Presbytery 

Margaret Lucille Vetter ...... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1942 
Allegheny Presbytery 

The Graduate School 

James Hiram Blackwood ...... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1930 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-XenIa Theological Seminary, 1933 

Monongahela Presbytery 

H. Andrew Bruder ....... Washington, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1925 

Th.B., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1928 

Chartiers Presbytery 

Edward Ralph De Lair ........ Butler, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1942 _ 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1945 

Butler Presbytery 

Paul R. Graham ........ Pittsburgh 2, Pa. 

A.B., Geneva College, 1938 

B.D., Princeton Theological Seminary, 1941 

Allegheny Presbytery 

William James Grossman ...... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1934 _ 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1939 

Allegheny Presbytery 

Franklin Willis Harper ...... Harrisville, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1940 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1943 

Butler Presbytery 

George Loren Jones ....... Homer City, Pa. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1943 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1946 

Conemaugh Presbytery 

Walter Edwin McCrory Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1934 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1937 

Monongahela Presbytery 

Wallace G. McGeoch ....... Leechburg, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1926 

Th.B., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1929 

Kiskiminetas Presbytery 



60 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



Howard Dewalt McMurray Oil City, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1931 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1935 

Lake Presbytery 

George D. Munro Carnegie, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 193S 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1939 

Monongahela Presbytery 

Clark Kenneth Weber ...... Elizabeth, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1938 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1941 

Westmoreland Presbytery 

Mac Kean Thaddeus Williams ..... Pittsburgh, Pa. 
A.B., Roger Williams College, 1918 
B.D., Oberlin Graduate- School of Theology, 1928 
Shiloh Baptist Church, Pittsburgh, Pa. 



SUMMARY OF ATTENDANCE 

Seniors ............ 15 

Middlers 9 

Juniors ............ 12 

Part-time Students . . . . . . . -. . .7 

Divinity School . . . . . . . . . .43 

Graduate School .......... 13 

Total 56 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 61 

INSTITUTIONS REPRESENTED 
(Undergraduates only) 

Asbury College, Kentucky ......... 

Buena Vista College, Iowa ......... 

Carnegie Institute of Technology, Pennsylvania ..... 

Grove City College, Pennsylvania • . . . . 

Hope College, Michigan .......... 

College of Idaho . . . . ... 

Knosville College, Tennessee 

Monmouth College, Illinois ......... 

Muskingum College, Ohio ......... 

Ohio State University .......... 

Sterling College, Kansas ......... 1 

Syracuse University, New York ........ 

Tarkio College, Missouri ......... 

Texas Christian University ......... 

University of Illinois .......... 

University of Southern California ........ 

Waynesburg College, Pennsylvania ........ 

Westminster College, Pennsylvania ....... 6 

43 



LOCALITIES REPRESENTED 

(Undergraduates only) 

California ............ 1 

Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . .2 

Idaho 1 

Illinois . . . . . . . . . . ■ . .2 

Iowa ............. 1 

Kansas ............. 3 

Kentucky ............ 1 

Michigan ............ 2 

Nebraska ............ 1 

New York . . .2 

North Carolina ........... 1 

Ohio 11 

Pennsylvania ............ 15 

43 



62 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 

SPECIAL LECTURES, 1946-1947 

In the Pressly Chapel 

Miss Emma Dean Anderson 
"Our Mission in India" 

Mr. Wm. R. Barbour 

"How to Write a Book" 

The Rev. Vincent D. Beckett, D.D. 
"Today in our Mission Fields" 

Tke Rev. Marc Boegner, D.TheoI. 

"The Protestant Church in France" 

Mr. Samuel A. Fulton 

"The World-Wide Christian Advance" 

The Rev. Robert W. Gibson, D.D. 
"Christian Education" 

The Rev. Richey Hogg 

"The Inter-Seminary Movement" 

The Rev. Stephen A. James, D.D. 

"That the Ministry be not Blamed" 

The Rev. H. H. McConnell, D.D. 
"Evangelism" 

The Rev. Robert N. Montgomery, D.D., LL.D. 
"The Mind of One Man" 

The Rev. Marshall Scott 

"The Church and Labor" — Series of four lectures 

The Rev. John Coventry Smith, D.D. 
"Stewardship" 

The Rev. A. K. Stewart, D.D. 

"The Responsibility of American Missions Today" 

The Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D. 
"The Necessity of the Cross" 

In the Western Seminary Chapel 

The Rev. Arthur Hays, D.D. 

"Some Thoughts on the Theism of Jesus" 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



63 



HISTORICAL ROLL OF PROFESSORS 



John Anderson 

John Banks 

James Ramsey 

Joseph Kerr 

MuNGO Dick 

John Taylor Pressly 

David Carson 

Thomas Beveridge 

Moses Kerr . 

Joseph Claybaugh 

Samuel W. McCracken 

James Martin 

James Lemonte Dinwiddie 

Abraham Anderson 

Alexander Downs Clark 

David Reynolds Kerr . 

Samuel Wilson 

William Davidson 

Alexander Young . 

John Scott . 

Joseph Clokey 

Andrew Morrow Black 

David Alexander Wallace 

David Alexander Wallace 

Joseph Tate Cooper 

William Bruce 

James Gillespie Carson 

William Gallogly Moorehead 

Jackson Burgess McMichael 

Alexander Young . 

James Harper 

David MacDill 

David A.- McClenahan 

James Alexander Grier 

John McNaugher 

Wilbert Webster White 

Oliver Joseph Thatcher 

John A. Wilson . 

John Douds Irons . 

Joseph Kyle 

Jesse Johnson 

John Elliott Wishart . 

William Riley Wilson . 

Charles Frederick Wishart 

John Hunter Webster , 

Melvin Grove Kyle 

James Doig Rankin 

David Frazier McGill . 

James Gallaway Hunt 

James Harper Grier 

Robert McNary Karr . 

James Leon Kelso 

George Boone McCreary 

Robert Nathaniel Montgomery 

Albert Henry Baldinger 

Clarence Joseph Williamson 

George Anderson Long 

Theophilus Mills Taylor 

Addison Hardie Leitch 

H. Ray Shear 



Place of 

Inauguration 

Service 

Philadelphia 

Canonsburg 

Pittsburgh 

Pittsburgh 

Allegheny 

Canonsburg 

Canonsburg 

Allegheny 

Oxford 

Oxford 

Canonsburg 

Allegheny 

Canonsburg 

Allegheny 

Allegheny 

Xenia 

Oxford 

Oxford 

Monmouth 

Xenia 

Monmouth 

Monmouth 

Xenia 

Allegheny 

Xenia 

Xenia 

Xenia 

Xenia 

Allegheny 

Xenia 

Xenia 

Allegheny 

Allegheny 

Allegheny 

Xenia 

Allegheny 

Allegheny 

Xenia 

Xenia 

Xenia 

Xenia 

Allegheny 

Allegheny 

Xenia 

Xenia 

Pittsburgh 

Pittsburgh 

Pittsburgh 

Pittsburgh 

St. Louis 

St. Louis 

St. Louis 

Pittsburgh 

Pittsburgh 

Pittsburgh 

Pittsburgh 

Pittsburgh 

Pittsburgh 

Pittsburgh 



Period of 
Service 
1794-1819 
1820-1826 
1821-1842 
1825-1829 
1829-1831 
1832-1870 
1834-1834 
183S-1871 
183S-1836 
1839-1855 
1839-1840 
1842-1846 
1843-1846 
1847-1855 
1847-1884 
1851-1887 
1855-1875 
1855-1858 
1855-1874 
1858-1874 
1858-1873 
1864-1874 
1867-1870 
1883-1883 
1871-1886 
1871-1880 
1873-1888 
1873-1914 
1873-1878 
1876-1891 
1879-1899 
1884-1902 
1885-1921 
1886-1909 
1886-1943 
1889-1894 
1888-1892 
1893-1915 
1895-1905 
1899-1921 
1903-1930 
1905-1923 
1907-1940 
1907-1914 
1908-1933 
1914-1930 
1914-1929 
1915-1931 
1920-1926 
1922-1926 
1922- 
1923- 
1924-1946 
1926-1930 
1931- 
1932- 
1942- 
1942- 
1946- 
1947- 



64 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS 

The provision of modern theological education without charge 
to students requires an extensive outlay on the part of the Semi- 
nary. The maintenance of the Seminary building and equipment 
is but one item in the annual draft upon the treasury. At the 
present time the income from endowment is quite insufficient to 
meet current expenses. 

The claims of the Seminary are, therefore, submitted to the 
consideration of all who wish to honor the Lord with their sub- 
stance. Congregations, as well as individuals, are asked to give 
their help to the institution. Appeal is also made to all who pur- 
pose making bequests to remember the Seminary, for the training 
of the ministry is the primary educational task of the Church. 

All bequests should be drawn as follows: 
For Personal Property 

I hereby give and bequeath to The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theo- 
logical Seminary of the United Presbyterian Church of North 

America, the sum of .dollars to 

constitute a part of the permanent funds of the institution. 

For Real Estate 

I hereby give and devise to The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological 
Seminary of the United Presbyterian Church of North America, 
its successors and assigns, forever, all that lot or piece of ground 
(carefully describing the property), the same to hold or dispose 
of for the benefit of the permanent funds of the institution. 

Bequests may also be made for special funds, scholarships, or 
lectures. 

Care should be taken to use the corporate name as given 
above, and to have the bequest conform to the laws of the State 
governing it. 



The Pittsburg h-Xen I a Theological Seminary 65 



CORRESPONDENCE 

In general, correspondence should be addressed to the Pres- 
ident of the Faculty, the Rev. George A. Long, D.D., 616 West 
North Avenue, Pittsburgh 12, Pa. 

Letters relating to the endowment and funds should be ad- 
dressed to Mr. M. J. Hein, Treasurer, using the Seminary address 
given above. 

All letters concerning registration and admission to the Sem- 
inary should be sent to the Registrar's Office. Likewise, all re- 
quests for transcripts of record should be addressed to the Regis- 
trar in properly written form, — giving the full name of the appli- 
cant, his present address, the place and period of attendance, and 
the name and address of the institution and official to whom the 
transcript is to be sent. The request should be accompanied by 
the usual fee of one dollar ($1.00), unless the transcript is the ap- 
plicant's first, or it is to be used in connection with an application 
for a Chaplaincy in the Armed Forces of the United States. 



66 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



INDEX 



Academic Regulations 

Accommodations in the Dormitory 

Admission, Terms of . 

Alumni Association 

Apartments for Married Students 

Archaeology, Semitics and . 

Attendance, Summary of 

Awards Granted, 1945-1946 

Bible Lands Museum . 

Calendar for 1947-1948 . 

Calendar of the Seminary . 

Chapel Preaching 

Church History and Government 

Classification of Students . 

Control and Management of the Seminary 

Correspondence .... 

Courses of Instruction, Description of 

Credentials Required for Admission 

Cultural Advantages of the Seminary 

Curriculum, in Outline 

Degrees Granted, 1945-1946 

Degree of B.D., Requirements for 

Degree of Th.M., Requirements . 

Denominational Seminary, Advantages of 

Dining Club 

Directors, Board of . 

Donations and Bequests 

Dormitory, Women's Committee 

Elective Courses 

Emeritus Professors 

English Bible 

Examinations 

Expenses . 

Facilities for Study 

Faculty 

Fee at Graduation 

Field Work 

Graduate Studies, Department of 

Graduation, Requirements and Awards 

Historical Roll of Professors 

Honors, Cum Laude Series . 

Insurance for students 

Institutions and Localities Represented 

Library and Reading Room 

Life at the Seminary . 

Location of the Seminary Building 



37 
46 
37 
S3 
47 
18 
60 
54 
42 

6 

5 

32 
25 
38 

7 
65 
18-33 
37 
43 
16 
54 
40 
34 
43 
49 

8 

64 
10 
17 
11 
23 
40 
49 
41 
11 
40 
32 
34 
40 
63 
40 
47 
61 
41 
46 
46 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Thelological Seminary 67 



Matriculation Fee .......... 38 

Musical Opportunity .......... 48 

New Testament Literature and Exegesis ...... 20 

Observatory, The Allegheny ........ 45 

Philosophy of Religion and Religious Education ..... 29 

Physical Culture .......... 49 

Planetarium, The Buhl Foundation ....... 45 

Practical Theology .......... 30 

Pre-Seminary Studies .......... 14 

Pre-Theological Major ......... IS 

Prizes Awarded, 1946 55 

Public Speaking .......... 33 

Purpose of the Seminary ......... 13 

Register of Students, 1946-1947 56 

Registration ........... 37,39 

Religious Education, Philosophy of Religion and ..... 29 

Religious Life at the Seminary ........ 47 

Rooms and Accommodations ........ 46 

Schedule, The Norm and Modifications ...... 39 

Scholarships, Competitive ......... 51 

Self-Support and Student Aid ........ 50 

Semitics and Biblical Archaeology ....... 18 

Social Life at the Seminary ........ 48 

Special Lectures, 1946-1947 62 

Standing of the Seminary ......... 7 

Student Association .......... 53 

Students, Register of, 1946-1947 56 

Summer Institute .......... 36 

Term and Course, prescribed by General Assembly . . . . 13 

Theology, Systematic and Biblical ....... 27 

Trustees, Board of ......... . 10 

University of Pittsburgh, Affiliation with ...... 44 

Webster Memorial Forum ......... 48 

Women's Dormitory Committee ........ 10 

Y.M.C.A., Allegheny Branch 49 



^ 



X 



THE 

PITTSBURGH-XENIA 

THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 




FOUNDED 1794 



ANNUAL CATALOGUE 
1947-1948 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 
1948-1949 



V 



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fe^ 



THE 
ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

OF THE 

Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Theological Seminary 

OF 

THE UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 
OF NORTH AMERICA 

616 West North Avenue 
PITTSBURGH 12, PA. 

1947-1948 

-8? 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

FOR THE YEAR 

1948-1949 



• CALENDAR FOR 1948 • | 




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THE SEMINARY CALENDAR 

1948 

23 May - 28 Aug. Summer Session in Practical Theology for stu- 
dents previously qualified in this Seminary 



Fall Term 

7 Sept. Registration of new students, 9:00 A.M. — 4:00 P.M. 

Assignment of rooms, 4:00 P.M. 

8 Sept. Registration of all regular Middlers and Seniors 

9:00 A.M.— 1:00 P.M. 

8 Sept. Formal Opening of the Session 

Opening Address in Pressly Chapel, 2:00 P.M. 
Reception to new students, 3 :00 P.M. 

9 Sept. Class work begins, 8:30 A.M. 

17 Sept. Seminary Communion Service, 7:00 P.M. 

Sacramental Address by the Rev. Ansley C. Moore, D.D. 

24 Nov. Last Day of the Fall Term 

25 Nov. Thanksgiving Day 



Winter Term 
26 Nov. Class work begins, 8:30 A.M. 
18 Dec. Christmas Vacation begins, after regular class hours 

1949 

4 Jan. Class work resumes, 8:30 A.M. 
9 Feb. Day of Prayer for Colleges and Seminaries 
Address by the Rev. J. Reed Miller, D.D. 
26 Feb. Last Day of the Winter term 



Spring Term 
1 Mar. Class Work begins, 8:30 A.M. 
14 Apr. Easter Recess begins, after regular class hours 
19 Apr. Class work resumes, 8:30 A.M. 
8 May Senior Communion Service, 4:00 P.M. 
The Pressly Chapel 
Professor H. Ray Shear officiating 
8 May Baccalaureate Service, 8:00 P.M. 
The Brookline Blvd. U. P. Church 
Sermon by Professor Robert M. Karr 
11 May Annual Meeting of the Board of Directors, 2:00 P.M. 

11 May Senior Reception, — the Board of Directors, 7:00 P.M. 

12 May Annual Meeting of the Alumni Association, 4:00 P.M. 

The First Church, North Side, Pittsburgh 
12 May Alumni Dinner, 5:30 P.M. 
12 May Graduating Exercises, 8:00 P.M. 

The First Church, North Side, Pittsburgh 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



THE CONTROL AND MANAGEMENT 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary is the result of a 
union of the Pittsburgh and Xenia Seminaries consummated in 
1930. According to its proper ancestry the Xenia Seminary was 
founded in 1794 by the Associate Presbyterian Church. The 
Pittsburgh Seminary was founded in 1825 under the auspices of 
the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church. The Seminary as 
now established is under the immediate control of the American 
Synods of the United Presbyterian Church and the ultimate review 
control of the General Assembly. Its management is committed to 
a Board of Directors and Trustees. The Board of Directors consists 
of thirty-five members, ministers or ruling elders, who are nom- 
inated by the several Synods to the General Assembly for elec- 
tion on the basis of each Synod having one representative for 
every five thousand church members or a major fraction thereof. 
Each Synod has at least one representative. The Board of 
Directors has the general government of the Seminary, subject 
to the authority of the Synods and the General Assembly, appoints 
the Trustees, and provides for the financial maintenance of the 
institution. The Board of Trustees consists of twelve members. 
It is the corporate body which holds and manages the real estate 
and the funds of the Seminary. The term and the course of 
study are determined by the General Assembly. 



ACCREDITATION OF THE SEMINARY 

The Seminary is an accredited member of the American 
Association of Theological Schools, and has had this standing 
from the time of the adoption of the Association's accrediting 
system in 1938. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



Synod of New York 

The Rev. J. M. Findley Brown, D.D. 
The Rev. Claire E. Hawthorne, D.D. 
The Rev. J. Kenneth Miller, M.A., D.D. 
The Rev. Roy E. Grace, Th.M., D.D. . 



The Rev. James M. Guthrie, D.D. 



Term 

Expires 

. Walton, N. Y. 1948 

Takoma Park, Md. 1948 

Garden City, N. Y. 1949 

Upper Darby, Pa. 1950 



Floral Park, L. I., N. Y. 1950 



Synod of Pittsburgh 

G. Ashton Brownlee, Esq. ..... Washington, Pa. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 



The Rev. R. W. Gibson, D.D. . 
Mr. J. S. Mason .... 
Mr. Frank H. Davis . . . . 
The Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D. 
The Rev. Paul M. Gillis, Th.M., Ph.D. 
The Rev. H. H. McConnell, Th.M., D.D. 
The Rev. James T. Vorhis, Th.M., D.D. 



Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Turtle Creek, Pa. 
New York, N. Y. 

Coraopolis, Pa. 



1948 
1948 
1948 
1949 
1949 
1950 
1950 
1950 



First Synod of the West 

Mr. Albert B. McClester Butler, Pa. 1948 

The Rev. Robert P. MacDonald. , . . New Wilmington, Pa. 1948 

The Rev. Wm. F. Rotzler, D.D. . . . Pittsburgh, Pa. 1948 

Mr. Frank L. Burton New Castle, Pa. 1949 

The Rev. J. M. Ferguson, D.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 1949 

The Rev. Don P. Montgomery, D.D. . . . Youngstown, Ohio 1949 

The Rev. Walker S. Brownlee .... Hamburg, N. Y. 1950 

The Rev. W. Scott McMunn, D.D Butler, Pa. 1950 

The Rev. Howard D. McMurray Oil City, Pa. 1950 



Synod of Ohio 

The Rev. Alfred Martin, Th.M. 

The Rev. Frank J. Irvine 

The Rev. J. L. McCreight, Ph.D., D.D. 



East Liverpool, Ohio 1948 

Dearborn, Mich. 1949 

New Concord, Ohio 1950 



Second Synod 

The Rev. R. A. Jamieson, D.D. 
The Rev. Leslie Mquntford, D.D, 



Cedarville, Ohio 1948 
Columbus, Ohio 1948 



Synod of Illinois 



The Rev. J. P. Lytle, D.D. 
The Rev. J. E. Simpson, D.D. 



West Allis, Wis. 1948 
Oak Park, III. 1948 



8 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 

Synod of Iowa ^^'J^^^ 

The Rev. R. A. Foster , . . . . . Keokuk, Iowa 1948 
The Rev. J. Dallas Gibson, Jr. ... . Tarklo, Mo. 1949 

Synod of the Plains 
The Rev. James L. Cottrell Tulsa, Okla. 1948 

Synod of Nebraska 

The Rev. Roy P. Morris Murray, Nebr. 1948 

Synod of California 
The Rev. Carl S. Dunn, D.D Los Angeles, Calif. 1948 

Synod of the Columbia 

The Rev. J. Boyd Patterson, D.D. .... Portland, Ore. 1950 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

The Rev. Roy E. Grace, Th.M., D.D., President 
The Rev. John E. Simpson, D.D., Vice President 
The Rev. James T. Vorhis, Th.M., D.D., Secretary 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

The Executive Committee 

The Rev. W. F. Rotzler, D.D., Chairman 

The Rev. James T. Vorhis, Th.M., D.D., Secretary 

The Rev. R. W. Gibson, D.D. 

Mr. Frank H. Davis 

Mr. Albert B. McClester 

The Rev. Don P. Montgomery, D.D. 

The Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D. 

The Committee on Beneficiary Funds 

The Seminary Faculty 



HONORARY DIRECTORS 

The Rev. J. Walter Liggitt, D.D. 
The Rev. W. E. McCulloch, D.D. 
The Rev. T. N. McQuoid, D.D. 
The Rev. W. L. C. Samson, D.D. 
The Rev. J. A. Thompson, D.D., LL.D., L.H.D. 
*The Rev. C. R. Watson, D.D., LL.D. 
The Rev. S. C. Gamble, D.D. 
Died January 11, 1948 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 9 

THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES Term 

Expires 

The Rev. E. A. Daum, D.D Valencia, Pa. 1948 

The Hon. W. H. McNaugher .... Pittsburgh, Pa. 1948 

George M. Swan, Esq Pittsburgh, Pa. 1948 

Mr. Frank H. Davis Pittsburgh, Pa. 1949 

The Rev. Charles W. Fulton, D.D. . . . Pittsburgh, Pa. 1949 

Mr. E. Bruce Hill Pittsburgh, Pa. 1949 

The Rev. James T. Vorhis, D.D. .... Coraopolis, Pa. 1949 

Robert Fisher, Esq. ....... Indiana, Pa. 1950 

Mr. T. J. Gillespie, Jr Pittsburgh, Pa. 1950 

J. M. Lashly, Esq., LL.D St. Louis, Mo. 1950 

The Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 1950 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

The Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D., President 
George M. Svi^an, Esq., Vice President 
Mr. M. J. Hein, Secretary and Treasurer 

STANDING COMMITTEES 
The Committee on Finance The Committee on Seminary Premises 

The Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D., Mr. Frank H. Davis, 

Chairman Chairman 

Mr. T. J. Gillespie, Jr. The Rev. Charles W. Fulton, D.D. 

Mr. Frank H. Davis 

The Purchasing Committee 

The Rev. George A. Long, D.D. 



DORMITORY COMMITTEE 
Mrs. Robert P. Rhodes, Chairman 
Miss Eleanor Gillespie Mrs. W. H. Ochiltree 

Miss Alice Gray Mrs. Chalmers T. Siviter 

Mrs. J. L. Kelso Mrs. A. H. Trimble 



THE BOARD OF ADVISORS 

OF THE 

DEPARTMENT OF CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

The Rev. Wm. F. Rotzler, D.D., Chairman 

The Rev. James T. Vorhis, Th.M., D.D., Secretary 

The Rev. Robert W. Gibson, D.D. 

Mr. Frank H. Davis 

Mr. Albert B. McClester 

The Rev. Don P. Montgomery, D.D. 

The Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D. 

Mrs. H. Ray Shear 

Mrs. Thomas R. Sarver 

Miss Edith L. McBane 

The Rev. A. K. Stewart, D.D. 

The Rev. Glenn P. Reed, D.D. 

The Rev. Charles L. Hussey, D.D. 



10 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



THE FACULTY 



The Rev. George Anderson Long, D.D., President 
Professor of English Bible 

7135 Reynolds Street, Pittsburgh 8, Pa. 

The Rev. Robert McNary Karr, D.D., Registrar 
Professor of Systematic and Biblical Theology 

236 Hilands Avenue, Ben Avon, Pittsburgh 2, Pa. 

The Rev. James Leon Kelso, Th.D., D.D. 

Professor of Semitics and Biblical Archaeology 

129 Altadena Drive, Mt. Lebanon, Pittsburgh 16, Pa. 

The Rev. Clarence Joseph Williamson, D.D., Secretary 
Professor of Church History and Government 

405 South Braddock Avenue, Pittsburgh 21, Pa. 

The Rev. Theophilus Mills Taylor, D.D. 

Professor, the John McNaugher Chair 

of New Testament Literature and Exegesis 

1009 Norwood Avenue, Ben Avon Heights, Pittsburgh 2, Pa. 

The Rev. Addison Hardie Leitch, Ph.D., D.D. 

Professor of Philosophy of Religion and Religious Education 
616 West North Avenue, Pittsburgh 12, Pa. 

Miss Florence M. Lewis, M.A., Dean of Women 
Associate Professor of Christian Education 

616 West North Avenue, Pittsburgh 12, Pa. 

The Rev. H. Ray Shear, D.D. 
Professor of Practical Theology 

616 West North Avenue, Pittsburgh 12, Pa. 

Professor Donald L. Barbe, M.A. 
Instructor in Public Speaking 
New Wilmington, Pa. 



Miss Mildred E. Cowan 

Secretary to the President 

Miss Dorothy J. Vorhis, A.B., B.S. in L.S. 
Librarian 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 11 



COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

The Credentials Committee 

Dr. Karr Dr. Leitch 

The Curriculum Committee 

The Faculty 

The Library Committee 

Dr. Taylor Dr. Leitch 

The Devotional Committee 

Dr. Williamson Dr. Shear 

The Committee on Field Work and Placement 

Dr. Shear Miss Lewis 

The Press Committee 

Dr. Kelso Dr. Williamson 

The Catalogue Committee 

Dr. Karr Dr. Leitch 

Graduate Studies Committee 

Dr. Taylor Dr. Leitch Dr. Kelso 



EMERITUS PROFESSORS 

*The Rev. John McNaugher, D.D., LL.D., Litt.D., President Emeritus 
Emeritus Professor of New Testament Literature and Exegesis 
321 Lafayette Avenue, Pittsburgh 14, Pa. 

tTHE Re'V. William Riley Wilson, D.D., LL.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Pastoral Theology and Homiletics 
328 Dalzell Avenue, Ben Avon, Pittsburgh 2, Pa. 

The Rev. Jesse Johnson, D.D., LL.D. 
Emeritus Professor of Church History 
Reynoldsburg, Ohio 

The Rev. George Boone McCreary, Ph.D., D.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Philosophy of Religion and Religious Education 
777 Berkeley Place, Claremont, Calif. 

The Rev. Albert Henry Baldinger, D.D. 
Emeritus Professor of Practical Theology 

41 Penshurst Road, Ben Avon Heights, Pittsburgh 2, Pa. 

The Rev. James Doig Rankin, D.D., LL.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Systematic and Biblical Theology 
715 South El Molino Avenue, Pasadena, Calif. 

*Died December 11, 1947. tDied December 26, 1947. 



12 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



JOHN McNAUGHER, D.D., LL.D., LItt.D. 
December 30, 1857 — December 11, 1947 



The following data are a mere chronography of the life of one 
whose place in the history of the church in general and in theological 
education in particular cannot be compassed in a few paragraphs. 
Dr. McNaugher, born December 30, 1857, was an alumnus of 
Westminster College in the class of 1880. He was graduated from 
Xenia Seminary in 1884, and ordained and installed as pastor at 
Fredericksburg, Ohio, in 1885. Elected to the chair of New Testa- 
ment Literature and Exegesis in the "Allegheny" Seminary, in 1886, 
he spent the following year in graduate work at Edinburgh, Scot- 
land, and was inducted into his chair in the fall of 1887. For 56 
years, until his retirement in 1942, he carried the full load of a 
professor, and simultaneously for 34 years the administrative work 
of the presidency without a single Sabbatical leave or serious inter- 
ruption of any kind, — a record possible only to a man of extra- 
ordinary resources, mental, spiritual and physical. To the last 
his great mind lost none of the vigor and the scholarly quality that 
marked his teaching throughout the years. 

Dr. McNaugher's interests were not limited to the walls of his 
class room, nor was his work confined to the borders of his own 
denomination. His services were in constant demand far beyond 
the bounds of the United Presbyterian Church. His Neighborhood 
Bible Class, with a maximum membership well over a thousand 
representing all denominations, was an influential factor in the 
religious life of the city. When issues arose, whether local or 
denominational, the Church almost always turned to him for wis- 
dom. His guiding hand was seldom absent from the councils of 
the Church. His gifted pen was seldom idle. His commencement 
addresses to the graduating classes were acknowledged master- 
pieces of thought and style. The books he left to the Church 
included The United Presbyterian Church, Its History and Mission 
(1899), Theological Education in the United Presbyterian Church 
and its Ancestries (1931), Quit You Like Men (1940), and the 
crown of his literary work, Jesus Christ the Same Yesterday, To- 
day and Forever (1947). 

If there is such a thing as a true nobility in a land where 
distinctions of birth and rank are unknown, Dr. McNaugher was 
a nobleman who could not countenance cheapness, crudity, stupid- 
ity or vulgarity. To sit at his feet as a teacher was to admire 
him, to know him intimately was to love him, to company with 
him was to feel the elevating influence of a great personality. 





Dr. John McNaugher 





Dr. William Riley Wilson 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



15 



WILLIAM RILEY WILSON, DD., LL.D. 

September 5, 1860 — December 26, 1947 



William Riley Wilson, son of David S. and Mary Orr Wilson, 
was born at Fairhaven, Ohio, September 5, 1860. He was gradu- 
ated from Washington and Jefferson College in the class of 1886, 
and from Allegheny Theological Seminary in 1889. Licensed to 
preach by First Ohio Presbytery in August, 1888, he was ordained 
and installed as pastor of the North Shenango congregation (Espy- 
ville. Pa.) by Lake Presbytery, September 10, 1889. His work in 
the pastorate in addition to three years in his first charge, covered 
seven years in the Second Church, Mercer, Pa.; three years in the 
Tenth Church, Allegheny Presbytery, and four years in the First 
Carnegie, Monongahela Presbytery. The degree of Doctor of 
Divinity was conferred upon him by Westminster and Grove City 
Colleges simultaneously in 1906, and the degree of Doctor of Laws 
by Muskingum College in 1934. 

In 1906, after seventeen fruitful years in the pastorate, Dr. 
Wilson was elected the first full time Professor of Homiletics and 
Pastoral Theology in Pittsburgh (now Pittsburgh-Xenia) Semi- 
nary. For thirty-four years he filled this chair with marked ability, 
lifting it to a distinguished place among the chairs of Practical 
Theology in American theological education. 

It was in and through his chair in the Seminary that Dr. 
Wilson made his chief contribution to the life and work of the 
Church. No tribute could express the love and esteem in which he 
was held by all who came to know him intimately. He had a genius 
for friendship. To his parishioners he was more than the preacher, 
to his students he was more than the professor; to all of them he 
was, above everything else, a warm-hearted human being with 
intense interest in life, a glowing enthusiasm for things spiritual 
and a passionate faith in the Scriptures as the revealed Word of 
God. He was no cold intellectual. The truths he grasped and the 
views he held were matters of the heart as well as of the head. His 
dogmas were more than intellectual concepts, they were potent, 
life-giving convictions of truth. They burned in his heart like 
glowing coals, and they kindled his emotions. His preaching was 
never colorless, his teaching was never tedious, his class room was 
never dull. The marks of his vigorous teaching, the inspiration of 
his glowing faith and the influence of his radiant life have been 
felt throughout the Church. 



16 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



THE PURPOSE OF THE SEMINARY 



The purpose of the Seminary, as defined in the Constitution, 
is to instruct candidates for the gospel ministry, ordained ministers 
of the gospel, and such as may be preparing for other special lines 
of Christian service, in the knowledge of the doctrines of the 
Scriptures and the order and institutes of worship taught therein 
and summarily exhibited in the standards of the United Presbyte- 
rian Church of North America; to cherish in them the life of 
true godliness, and to cultivate the gifts which Christ, the Head 
of the Church, confers on those whom He calls and ordains to the 
ministry, to the end that there may be raised up a succession of 
able, faithful, and godly ministers of the gospel and of other 
Christian workers. 



THE UNDERGRADUATE DEPARTMENT 



THE TERM AND COURSE OF STUDY 



The regular course of ministerial training prescribed by the 
General Assembly covers a period of three academic years, each of 
which is divided into three terms. The annual session begins the 
second Wednesday of September, and continues thirty-five weeks 
including holidays. 

The Seminary course is built for college graduates, and 
presupposes a foundation of broad and liberal culture. In 
preparation for their professional training in the Seminary, college 
students should take substantial courses in the subjects indicated 
in the following recommended Pre-Seminary Studies. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 17 



PRE-SEMINARY STUDIES 

The American Association of Theological Schools, at its 

twelfth biennial meeting, Lexington, Ky., June, 1940, adopted a 

Statement regarding Pre-Seminary Studies and authorized it to be 

sent to all colleges and universities in the United States and 

Canada. The statement includes the following specifications as to 

the proper fields of study, and the minimum number of semester 

hours: 

Semester 
Fields Hours 

English (Composition and Literature) » - 8' 12 

Bible or Religion _ _ _ ._ - - - 4'6 

Philosophy (At least two of the following: Introduction to philosophy, 
History of philosophy, Ethics, Logic) „ 4'6 

A foreign language (At least one of the following: Latin, Greek, 
Hebrew, French, German) .12'16 

Natural sciences (Physical or biological) ™ 4'6 

Social sciences (At least two of the following: Economics, Sociology, 
Government or political science. Social psychology. Education) 4'6 

Concentration of work or 'majoring', is a common practice in colleges. For 
such concentration or major, a constructive sequence based upon any one, 
two, or three of the above fields of study would lead up naturally to a 
theological course. 

With the addition of a substantial course in Speech, and of 
12-16 semester hours in Elementary Greek, with the emphasis 
upon vocabulary, grammar and syntax, the Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Seminary has endorsed the foregoing Statement of Pre-Seminary 
Studies, and urges all college students who are looking forward 
to the Gospel ministry to make use of this Statement in tne 
shaping of their college course (in consultation with their advisors 
at college), so that they may not only secure the desired college 
degree but at the same time secure the best possible preparation 
for seminary work. 

The Statement of Pre-Seminary Studies does not purport to 
be in itself a complete four-year college course, but rather calls 
attention to those fields and courses of study which are accessible 
to all college students and which are of basic importance in 
preparation for seminary training. 



18 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 

The Statement is not yet mandatory, but it indicates the 
trend in seminary circles. The Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary will 
use this Pre-Seminary Statement of Studies as a standard by 
which to judge the preparedness of applicants for admission. 

Those who have notable deficiencies, especially in Philosophy 
and Greek, will be required to remove them. All new registrants 
will be required to take a placement examination in New Testa- 
ment Greek, regardless of the amount of collegiate Greek credits 
presented for entrance. This placement examination is based 
upon the vocabulary of the Johannine literature and the grammar 
covered in Machen's New Testament Greek for Beginners. Those 
failing to pass the examination with a minimum grade of 75 will 
be placed in appropriate classes in Elementary Greek which are 
offered for the convenience of those who are partially or totally 
deficient in Greek. Adequate preparation is prerequisite to New 
Testament Exegesis. 

PRE-THEOLOGICAL MAJOR 

Students in Colleges of Agriculture, who have it in mind to 
prepare for ministering to rural churches, may not find it entirely 
practicable to follow the Pre-Seminary Studies outlined above. 
In such case, and with a view to the most effective rural ministry, 
we recommend that in their college days they follow the Pre- 
Theological Major suggested by the Conference on Relation- 
ships between Colleges of Agriculture and Theological Seminaries, 
held at Purdue University, Nov. 6, 1940. The suggested Pre- 
Theological Major is as follows: 

"At least one basic course (three semester hours) in each of the following 
fields: 

Agricultural Economics 

Economics 

English Composition, 2 courses (6 semester hours) 

English Literature (preferably 2 courses) 

History or Government (preferably 2 courses) 

Philosophy 

Public Speaking 

Psychology 

Rural Sociology 

Sociology 

"In addition the student would fulfill the minimum requirements of the 
College of Agriculture, which include Science (usually Biology and Chemistry). 

"Recommended Electives: 
Education 
Foreign Language 

"Undergraduate courses in religion are not required in the suggested major, 
as these cannot be offered in state-supported institutions." 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 19 



ADMISSION 

Registration for the Fall Term. Tuesday, September 7, 1948, 
is set aside for the registration of all new students. Wednesday 
morning is reserved for the registration of all regular students 
in the Middle and Senior classes. Students having any Irregulari- 
ties in their standing or schedule should in every case arrange 
to be seen by special appointment. It is important that students 
come for registration at the times designated. In case of late 
registration, a fee of one dollar a day is required up to a maximum 
of five dollars, and the period during which late registration is 
permitted is limited to ten days from the beginning of each quarter. 

Normal Time for Entrance. The normal time to enter the 
Seminary is at the opening of the annual session In September. 
The regular program of training begins at this time, and exhibits 
the maximum values when taken In proper educational sequence. 

Credentials. Every applicant for admission to the Seminary 
must present satisfactory credentials of his suitableness as a can- 
didate for the ministry or other contemplated form of Christian 
service. These credentials include: 1) A Letter of Introduction 
from his Pastor or Session testifying to his Christian character, 
active church membership, and general fitness for the ministry; 

2) A Letter from the Clerk of his Presbytery, or corresponding 
church officer, indicating his official acceptance as a candidate 
for the ministry and his recommendation as a student of theology; 

3) A complete official Transcript of his Academic Credits, begin- 
ning with his high school record unless the applicant has com- 
pleted two or more years of college work; (the degree of A.B., or 
an equivalent degree, from an accredited college or university Is 
required for admission) ; 4) Satisfactory Testimonials from at 
least three personal references, as Indicated on the application 
blank. 

Declaration of Purpose. Before being admitted to the privi- 
leges of the Seminary, every student shall, In the presence of the 
Registrar, subscribe a declaration to the effect that while he is a 
student in the Seminary he will regularly, punctually, and diligently 



20 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



attend upon all the instructions of the professors, that he will 
promptly comply with the lawful requisitions of the Faculty and 
be subject to their authority, that he will honestly conform to all 
regulations of the Seminary, and that he will not propagate any 
opinions in opposition to the standards of the United Presbyterian 
Church. 

Entrance Deposit. From the moment of entrance, students are 
regarded as stewards of the Church's property, having special 
responsibility in connection with the free use of library and dormi- 
tory equipment. Each student, upon matriculation, is required to 
make a deposit of ^5.00, which is returnable at the end of the 
Seminary course, less the insurance premium and any other nec- 
essary deductions. (See page 60.) 

A Matriculation Fee of $5.00 is required of each new student. 

CLASSIFICATION 

Regular Degree Students. Applicants for admission as 
students in full standing to take the prescribed course in prepara- 
tion for the Degree of B.D. must have a bachelor's degree from a 
standard college or university, the degree having been secured 
without duplication of credit. 

Part-Time Students. Students who are not so situated that 
they can devote full time to Seminary work may be admitted by 
the Faculty to take such courses as their time permits in prepara- 
tion for some form of Christian service. But they must have the 
same academic preparation, and furnish the same credentials, as 
are required of Regular Degree Students. 

Classification by Years. Students who register for the full 
course are, for practical purposes, classified normally as Juniors 
during their first academic year, as Middlers during their second 
year, and as Seniors during their third year. 

Transferred Students. Persons qualified for admission to the 
Seminary, who have successfully completed partial courses in some 
other school of theology accredited by the American Association 
of Theological Schools, may be admitted by the Faculty to corres- 
ponding standing in this institution upon the presentation of 
satisfactory credentials, which should include (1) a certificate of 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 21 



good standing and honorable dismission, and (2) a complete 
official transcript of their credits. Students transferring from non- 
accredited seminaries will be admitted only on probation. 

THE STUDENT'S SCHEDULE 

The Norm. Students adequately prepared, and able to give 
full time to Seminary work, are expected to follow the regular 
schedule, involving 16 credit hours a term throughout the entire 
Seminary course. 

Extra-curricular Work. No student shall take academic work 
in excess of the norm, without special permission from the Faculty. 
A record of scholarly work is pre-requisite to the granting of such 
permission. Moreover, without special permission from the Fac- 
ulty, which will not be granted unless the case be strictly excep- 
tional, no student shall assume responsibility for a congregation 
as pastor or as stated supply. 

Limitations. Students having outside work of any kind in- 
volving heavy demands upon their time will be limited to such 
courses as they can carry satisfactorily. And those who, for any 
reason, fail to do a satisfactory grade of work In their scheduled 
studies will also be subject to limitation by the Faculty. 

The Minimum. Students must carry at least 12 hours of con- 
current Seminary work in order to be entitled to the privileges of 
the dormitory. 

Registration each Quarter. At the beginning of each quarter 
every student shall file with the Registrar a complete list of his 
studies, together with a memorandum of all his outside work, 
actual and proposed. When his schedule of studies has been ap- 
proved, no change may be made by the student without consulting 
the Registrar. 

ATTENDANCE 
Regular and prompt attendance is Indispensable to satisfac- 
tory work. All absence, or even tardiness, for whatever reason, 
has an injurious effect on the student's standing and progress. 
Absence Immediately preceding or Immediately following any 
holiday period is charged double against the student's record. 
Excuses for absence must be presented In writing, to the profess- 
ors concerned, Immediately upon return to class work; and shall 
specify date, classes missed, and cause of absence. 



22 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



EXAMINATIONS 

In order to test the student's progress in the various depart- 
ments, written examinations are held at the close of each quarter. 
From these examinations and the classroom work, the term grades 
of the student are determined. Seventy per cent, is required as a 
passing grade in every subject. A report of the student's attend- 
ance and credits is made to his presbytery, or corresponding 
church body, at the close of each quarter. 

GRADUATION: REQUIREMENTS AND AWARDS 

General Requirements. In order to graduate, a student must 
successfully complete the regular three-year course of prescribed 
and elective studies amounting to 144 quarter hours, together with 
six units of field work. At least one year of work in residence 
is required for graduation. 

The Degree of B.D. The Diploma of the Seminary with the 
Degree of Bachelor of Divinity is conferred only upon Degree 
Students who complete the regular course in a manner satisfactory 
to the Faculty and who maintain more than average ability in 
every department. 

Graduation Fee. A fee of ^5.00 is charged to cover the cost 
of Diploma. This fee is due the ISth of the month preceding 
graduation. 

Graduation Honors. The honor. Cum Laude, is granted to all 
who throughout the Seminary course are clearly distinguished 
(1) for academic attainments, (2) for regular and punctual at- 
tendance, and (3) for general fitness for the gospel ministry. 
The honor, Magna Cum Laude, is granted to all who possess these 
qualifications In an unusual degree; and, Summa Cum Laude, in 
very rare instance, in recognition of superlative merit- 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 23 



SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS 



The following competitive scholarships have been provided 
for the benefit of United Presbyterian students for the ministry. 
In order to compete, contestants must carry not less than the reg- 
ular quota of studies; they must complete each term's work satis- 
factorily, without any conditions or failures; and they must fur- 
thermore meet the particular requirements of the desired scholar- 
ship or prize as hereinafter specified. Under each scholarship an 
award is made once each year, at which time the Faculty considers 
all regular degree students who, during the preceding twelve 
months, have completed the necessary amount of work in a 
satisfactory manner. 

The James Purdy Scholarship 

There exists in the possession of the Seminary the Purdy Fund, 
bearing the name of its founder. The income, not to exceed ^300, 
is apportioned equally each year to the six members of the Junior 
Class who attain the highest average of excellence in their Seminary 
work. The scholarship is subject to the conditions that no award 
be made to a student whose general average does not reach 85% 
or who receives a grade of less than 80% in any department, and 
that the entire Seminary course be finished at this Seminary. 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship 

In memory of the late Thomas Jamison, Esq., of the North 
Side, Pittsburgh, for many years a member of the Board ol 
Trustees of the Seminary, Mrs. Jamison endowed a scholarship, 
the income of which, not to exceed $800, is given each year to the 
member of the Senior Class who attains the highest average of 
excellence in qualifications for the Christian ministry during the 
Junior and Middle years and the first term of the Senior year. 
In the matter of grades, his general average must reach 90%, 
and in no study must the grade be lower than 80%. The winner 
of this award must present to the Faculty within a reasonable 
time a thesis of not less than 10,000 words on a subject selected 
or approved by the Faculty. 

While this award is made without further conditions attached. 
It is the hope of the Faculty that each Jamison scholar will ap- 



24 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



predate the importance of maintaining the Seminary's ideals and 
traditions of scholarship, and that he will use the award promptly 
in connection with a full session of graduate study in some insti- 
tution selected or approved by the Faculty. In this connection, he 
will be expected to make regular reports of the work he is doing 
and submit transcript of grades received. This scholarship af- 
fords a splendid opportunity to a worthy man each year for 
broadening his theological education and obtaining the rich cul- 
ture which comes with advanced study at the graduate level. 

s 

The Jane Hogg Gardner Scholarship 

To the Senior student ranking second in qualifications for 
the ministry through the entire course, the Seminary awards the 
income of the Gardner bequest, not to exceed $200, but on condi- 
tion that there is no grade of less than 80% in any department, 
and that a satisfactory thesis of at least 5,000 words on an assigned 
subject be presented to the Faculty within a year from graduation. 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Foundation 

By bequest, in memory of her husband, the late Mrs. Hen- 
rietta M. Lee, of Oakmont Pa., established the "Robert A. 
Lee Church History Foundation," the annual income of which is 
to be given to the Senior student who ranks first in the entire 
course in Church History. Candidates for this award must attend 
this Seminary from the beginning of their Junior year and re- 
ceive no grade less than 80% in any department. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



25 



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26 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



ELECTIVE COURSES 

The following Elective Courses are available to qualified undergraduates 

(ordinarily Middlers and Seniors), and also to students in the Graduate Department, 
who may apply them toward their degree in the fields indicated. (See page 43.) 



Course 



Quarter 
Hours 



Fields 



1 



3 



jr*. 



113. Inter'Testament History 


3 




X 






ISO. 0. T. Canon and Text (given with No. 2S0) 


m 


X 


X 






151, 152. Hebrew Exegesis . • (each) 


3 


X 








153. Hebrew Critical Paper . . . . 


3 


X 








155. Geography of Bible Lands 


3 


X 




X 


X 


157. Archaeology of Palestine .... 


3 


X 








158. Seminar in Archaeology . . . *. 


3 


X 








160. Current Trends in 0. T. Criticism 


3 


X 








250. N. T. Canon and Textual Criticism 


l!/2 


X 


X 






253. Greek Critical Paper 


3 


X 








254. Readings in the Koine Papyri 


3 


X 








25?. Exegetical Seminar .... 


3 


X 








260. The Church and Its Art ... . 


3 


X 


X 


X 


X 


261, Critical Introd. to the Pauline Epistles 


3 


X 








262. Recent Developments in Synoptic Criticism 


3 


X 








263. Critical Introd. to the Johannine Writings 


3 


X 








264. History of the Christian Liturgy 


3 


X 


X 




X 


265. Research in New Testament 


3 


X 








350. The Parables of Jesus .... 


3 


X 


X 




X 


351. Jeremiah ....... 


3 


X 






X 


352. The Gospel According to John 


3 


X 


X 




X 


354. Isaiah I 


3 


X 






X 


355. Isaiah II 


3 


X 






X 


450. Comparative Religion .... 


3 




X 


X 


X 


451. The Early American Church 


1 




X 






453. American Church Biography 


3 




X 






454. History of Doctrine ..... 


3 




X 


X 


X 


455. Bible Characters ..... 


3 


X 


X 




X 


550. Doctrinal Thesis 


3 




X 






S51jJriie Tpafhing of Jesus .... 


3 


X 


X 

- X. - 

X 


X 
■- X — 


X 


559-/^reridsinTneology . . . . . 


3 




1 — K 


651. Psychology of Religion .... 


3 




X 


X 


X 


652. Organization and Admin, in Educa. Programs 


3 






X 


X 


653. Methods of Religious Teaching 


3 






X 


X 


656. Problems in Modern Christian Thought 


3 




X 


X 


X 


750. Seminar in Sermon Composition 


3 








X 


751. Preaching from the Old Testament 


3 








X 


752. Preaching in the First Five Centuries 


3 




X 


X 


X 


754. Ezekiel and Daniel ..... 


3 


X 






X 


851, 852. Public Speaking . . . (each) 


1 






X 


X 


854. Preparation for Public Speaking 


3 






X 


X 



Total 



75 49 



35 



65. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 27 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



SEMITICS AND BIBLICAL ARCHAEOLOGY 
Dr. Kelso 

The aim of this department is to give the student an appreciation and 
an understanding of the Old Testament. To that end courses are offered ( 1 ) 
in the Hebrew language and its peculiar thought techniques, (2) in the Arch' 
aeology of the ancient Near East, (3) in the detailed History of the Hebrew 
people, and (4) in the Old Testament Theology as contrasted with the hea' 
then religions of those days. Seminar courses studying the latest books 
and magazine articles teach the student how he can evaluate and use new 
materials when he gets into the pastorate. An excellent Bible Lands Museum 
serves as a class room in this department. 

Ill, 112. Old Testament History. A study of the political and religious 
history of the Hebrew people from the days of Abraham to the close of the 
Old Testament, with special emphasis on the more significant personalities, 
events and institutions. The results of archaeological research are studied 
in conjunction with the Biblical record. 

Juniors, fall and winter, 3 quarter hours credit each term. 

113. Inter-Testament History. A resume of the Persian and Greek 
periods in Palestine, and a detailed study of the Maccabaean and Roman 
periods, so as to give the student a broad background for the New Testament 
study. The Apocrypha is studied in detail. 

Elective, Juniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

123. Hebrew Language. A practical course in the Hebrew language 
designed to achieve the following objective: to familiarize the student with a 
working vocabulary of the language and the essential features of its gram' 
mar. A text with lectures and written exercises. 

Middlers, fall term, 6 recitations a week, 4 quarter hours credit. 

124a, b. Hebrew Reading. A course in the accurate translation and inter' 
pretation of Biblical Hebrew designed to show the wealth of sermonic ma' 
terial in the original Hebrew. Selected Psalms and historical passages. 

Middlers, winter and spring, 3 quarter hours credit each term. 

132. Old Testament Theology. A detailed study of the major doctrines 
of the Old Testament, with a quick survey of the historical progress of 
Revelation in the light of contemporary civilizations and reHgions. 

Seniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

150. Old Testament Canon and Text. History of the formation of the 
Hebrew Canon, with emphasis upon the rejection of the Apocrypha. A 
brief history of the Hebrew text and the major versions. 

Elective, V/i quarter hours credit. (Given with No. 250). 



28 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



151, 152. Hebrew Exegesis. Practice in acquiring the principles of Old 
Testament exegesis, not only from the linguistic field, but also from the 
archaeological source material. The more difficult Hebrew passages with 
rich sermonic possibilities are used. 

Elective, Seniors, 3 quarter hours credit for each course. 

153. Hebrew Critical. In order to enable the students to meet the 
requirements of their respective presbyteries in connection with ordination, 
provision is made for each Senior to present a critical paper on the Hebrew 
text of an assigned passage from the Old Testament. There will be individ' 
ual conferences by appointment for reports of progress, during the first 
week of each month of the term. Papers will be due on the last day pre' 
ceding examinations. 

Elective, Seniors, fall or winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

155. Geography of Bible Lands. A survey course covering the major 
features of all ancient geography which influenced Biblical history, and a 
detailed study of Palestinian geography and its relation to Old Testament 
history and the customs and manners of its peoples. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

157. Archaeology of Palestine. A rapid historical survey of archaeological 
work in Bible lands, with particular attention to the cultural and religious 
life of the Israelite and non'IsraeUte populations in Palestine. Methods of 
archaeological research and the interpretation of findings are studied, not 
only for apologetic purposes, but especially for the exegetical study of the 
Scriptures. Assigned readings, slides and materials from the Bible lands 
museum. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

158. Seminar in Archaeology. The period of the Exodus and Conquest. 
A research course in which the student becomes acquainted not only with all 
available historical and archaeological source materials, but also with the 
proper methods of presenting his conclusions in such a fashion that they 
will be helpful to the average church member. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

160. Current Trends in Old Testament Criticism. A course designed to 
train students in the evaluation of new books and technical magazine articles 
in all fields of Old Testament research. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 29 



NEW TESTAMENT LITERATURE AND EXEGESIS 
Dr. Taylor 

The work in this department is centered in the history, literature and 
interpretation of our Primary Source, the New Testament. The aim through' 
out is to impress upon the student the uniqueness of Christianity and its 
Textbook; and to make the study of the New Testament both inspirational 
and practical, looking toward the future pastoral and homiletical work of 
the student. Each student is expected to read, at one sitting, each of the 
New Testament books in its entirety during the period when it is under class' 
room consideration. These readings will follow the text of the Revised 
Standard Version. Repeated readings are advised. The student may use the 
Greek text of Tischendorf (VIII Edition), Westcott and Hort, or Nestle (16th 
Edition, 1936) in the exegetical and critical work. (Except as otherwise 
indicated, courses are given by the professor in charge). 

211. Elementary Greek. New students who are not properly qualified for 
work in New Testament Exegesis are required to study the elements of the 
Greek language. A suitable text is used, and special attention is given to 
vocabulary, verbal forms and syntax. . „>, * 

Juniors (J*), fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. ♦ #WU» ^X^""^***^ ' 

212a. Elementary Greek. Grammar and syntax continued. 

Juniors (J^), winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. • "4^ * *^^iu<*i ft ««" " " * 

212b. Elementary Greek. Portions of the Gospel according to John and 
of the Catholic Epistles are read critically in the Greek withcjie aid ^ 
Green's Gramma& ^ ^j 

Juniors (J^), spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. '^'y^** '" ' ' 

213. Greek Reading. Readings in the New Testament, with grammar re- 
view and drill. This course is designed for those students who have had some 
Greek but who need additional study and practice in order to gain that pro- 
ficiency in language which is demanded by the exegetical courses, t* •v ^ 

Juniors (J^), fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Leiteh. ^K«»^*"'* '" 

214. Greek Reading. A continuation of course No. 213. (Credit given, 
but not applicable on two semesters required Exegesis). . 

Juniors (J^), winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. L«fch. rk^,^f4 ^AA **>% 

215. Biblical Interpretation, (a) The Oriental Mind: Jesus was an Ori' 
ental, Who ministered and preached to Orientals. Adequate interpretation 
of Scripture, therefore, demands an understanding of Oriental, and particularly 
Semitic, psychology and logic. A study is made of them, using the Scrip- 
tures and contemporary literature, together with experiences from modern 
Oriental life, for documentation. Lectures, readings, and discussion, (b) 
Hermeneutics proper: A review of the history of interpretation in the Church, 
with a determination of the principles of sound exegesis as exemplified in the 
grammatico-historical method. Lectures and discussion. 

Juniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

221. New Testament Introduction, (a) New Testament World: The his' 
torical setting in which the New Testament appeared, — old Greek religion, 
later Hellenistic mystery religions, Hellenistic-Judaism and the Jewish sects. 
(b) The Gospels and Acts: Introduction and survey. Synoptic and Johan- 
nine problems, Luke-Acts and apostolic history. Textbook, lectures and 
required readings. 

Middlers, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



30 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



222. New Testament Introduction, (a) Pauline Epistles: Historical, lit' 
erary and critical study with a survey of the text, (b) General Epistles: 
Introduction and survey. (c) Apocalypse: Introduction and survey. A 
sympathetic review of the various schools of interpretation. 

Middlers, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

241. New Testament Greek Exegesis. Epistle to the Romans: A re 
view of the principles of Hermeneutics, followed by a critical study of the 
Greek text in application of these principles. The first few chapters are 
dealt with illustratively by lectures, followed by a general class assignment, 
the remainder of the term being given over to individual assignments. 
Lectures, collateral readings, reports and discussions. 

Middlers and qualified Juniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

242. New Testament Greek Exegesis. Epistle to the Hebrews: Contin' 
uation of the report and discussion method. (See Course No. 241 above). 

Middlers and qualified Juniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

250. New Testament Canon and Textual Criticism, (a) The Canon: A 
study of the formation of the New Testament. The limiting principle of 
the Canon and the consequent rejection of apocryphal and pseudepigraph' 
ical works. The position of the Roman Church, of the Church of 
England, and of the Presbyterian and Reformed bodies as shown in the West' 
minster Confession. Lectures and required readings. (b) Textual Criti' 
cism: A survey of the history of the printed text, with an introduction to 
the apparatus criticus and the principles of textual criticism. An appraisal 
of the Tischendorf, Nestle, and Westcott and Hort texts. Textbook, 
lectures and required readings. 

Elective, V/z quarter hours credit. (Given with No. 150). 

253. Greek Critical. In order to enable the students to meet the re' 
quirements of their respective presbyteries in connection with ordination, 
provision is made for each senior to present a critical paper on the Greek 
text of an assigned passage from the New Testament. There will be a 
minimum of three individual conferences by appointment, scheduled during 
the term for each registrant. Papers are due on the last Friday before 
the examinations of the term. 

Elective, Seniors, fall or winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

254. Readings in the Koine Papyri. An advanced course dealing with 
the non-literary papyri discovered within recent years. Their bearing upon 
our understanding of New Testament words and phrases. The aim is to 
provide a broader knowledge of first century thought for a fuller and more 
accurate interpretation of the New Testament. 

Elective, for advanced students, 3 quarter hours credit. 

255. Exegetical Seminar. For the advanced Greek student especially 
interested in Exegesis. A choice of research problems in exegesis is permit- 
ted each student. Reports for round-table discussion. A summary written 
paper is presented in lieu of a final examination. 

Elective, Seniors and qualified Middlers, 3 quarter hours credit. 

260. The Church and Its Art. (a) The Origin and Development of the 
Church Edifice, traced through the various architectural periods from the 
diaspora synagogues to the present, showing the different lines of influence. 
A discussion of architectural styles adaptable and suitable to the requirements 
of the American Church today. Illustrated lectures, readings and discussions. 
(b) Christian Art and SymboHsm: A survey of Christian graphic and plastic 
art through the centuries. The importance of symbolism to the early Chris- 
tians, and its place in the Church's art today. Illustrated lectures, readings 
and discussions. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



■Ml' 



r 



261. Critical Introduction to the Pauline Epistles. A rapid survey of 
Paul's life on the basis of a synthesis of the records in Acts and the Epistles. 
The origin and completion of the Corpus Paulinun/ The groupings of 
the ten major epistles. Recent criticism" of tfit authorship of II Thess., Col., 
Eph., and of the place of origin of the captivity correspondence. The prob' 
lems of Romans 16, and of the Pastorals. Sacramentalism, and other 
mystery features in Pauline theology. 

Elective, for advanced students, 3 quarter hours credit. 

262. Recent Developments in Synoptic Criticism. An introduction to 
formgeschichte, with a critical appraisal of its strong points and weaknesses, 
its possibilities and dangers. The possible permanent values which it may 
contribute in the field of New Testament study. An adequate working 
knowledge of Greek is required. 

Elective, for advanced students, 3 quarter hours credit. 

263. Critical Introduction to the Johannine Writings. An appraisal of 
recent criticism as to the unity of the Fourth Gospel and the so'called 
epistles, and as to the relationship of the Apocalypse to the Johannine group, 
dealing with the differences in grammar, vocabulary and thought'concepts. 
The Apocalypse in the field of apocalyptics. Antagonism toward it among 
the early Fathers and among the Reformers. 

Elective, for advanced students, 3 quarter hours credit. 

264. History of the Christian Liturgy. The liturgy of the Church traced 
from the pre'Christian synagogue through the period of development to the 
crystallization of the Roman rite in the time of Gregory (III. Special study 
of the origins of the AntC'Communion (Proanaphora) and of the Commun' 
ion (Anaphora), and of their early association. The development of the 
Canonical Hours. Sources: I Clement, Ignatian Epistles, Didache, Justin's 
First Apology, Canons of Hyppolytus, and The Apostolic Constitutions. 

Elective, Seniors and Graduates, 3 quarter hours credit. 

265. Research in the New Testament. Directed research along various 
lines as indicated by the student's needs. 

Elective, Graduate Students, 3 quarter hours credit. 



32 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 

ENGLISH BIBLE 
Dr. Long 



It is the aim of this department to provide, in close co'Operation with 
other departments, a careful study of the content of the English Bible. 
Courses are designed so that, in connection with the Old Testament and New 
Testament departments, opportunity is given to the student to study, either 
in the original language or in English, every book of the Bible, with a view 
to securing not only a knowledge of the authorship, critical questions and 
historical background, but also a knowledge of the Scripture itself. 



311. The Gospels. There will be literary and historical study of the 
Gospels, covering their general features, a survey of their content and the 
relation of the Synoptics to the Fourth Gospel. Critical questions in con' 
nection with the Gospels will be studied in Course No. 221. 

Juniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



312. The Life of Christ. The life of Christ will be studied on the basis 
of the materials contained in the Gospels, — His birth, baptism, temptation, 
self'consciousness, teachings, miraculous activity, crucifixion, resurrection 
and ascension. 

Juniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



322. The Poetical Books. This course is designed to provide (a) a general 
introduction to the poetry and wisdom writings of the ancient Hebrews; (b) 
a comprehensive survey of the Psalter; and (c) an analysis of Job, Eccle- 
siastes and the Song of Songs. 

Middlers, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



331. The Eighth Century Prophets. There will be (a) a general survey 
of prophetism in Israel, its origin and development from earliest times to the 
time of the canonical prophets; (b) historical introduction to the Prophets 
of the Eighth Century, B.C.; and (c) a detailed study of Amos, Hosea, 
Micah and Isaiah. Attention will be given to the social ethics of these 
prophecies and their bearings on contemporary life. 

Seniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Leitch. 



332. The Later Prophets. The course includes a study of the historical 
introduction to and the contents of the writings of the prophets who ap' 
peared in the critical years of the late seventh century B.C., and in the re' 
construction period following the exile. Attention will be given to the un- 
usual literary features, exegetical studies of outstanding passages, and the 
permanent values of the teachings of these prophets. 

Seniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Leitch. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 33 



350. The Parables of Jesus. A careful study of the incomparable para- 
bles of our Lord, which occupied so large a place in His teaching. Attention 
will be given to their meaning for our Lord's hearers, and to their teaching 
for our own day. Homiletic values will be thoroughly reviewed. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

351. Jeremiah. This course is a careful study of the life and work of this 
great prophet. Attention is given to the prophecy in the light of contempor' 
ary history and especially to the contribution made to the central message of 
the Bible. Its relevance for our day and its homiletical values are considered. 

Elective, Seniors and Graduates, 3 quarter hours credit. 

352. The Gospel According to John. An intensive study of the content 
of this Gospel. While some attention is given to questions of introduction, 
the central emphasis is on the purpose, the message, and the contribution it 
makes to our interpretation of Christ. Homiletic values are specifically 
considered. • 

Elective, Seniors and Graduates, 3 quarter hours credit. 

354. Isaiah L A study of the first thirtynine chapters of the Prophecy of 
Isaiah. Attention is given to the historic background, to the content, and 
especially to its relevance for our day. 

Elective, Seniors and Graduates, 3 quarter hours credit. (1949'?0) 

355. Isaiah II. A study of chapters forty to sixtysix. A thorough review 
of the content is undertaken, with special emphasis upon its Messianic teach' 
ing. As in Isaiah I, homiletic values are given consideration. 

Elective, Seniors and Graduates, 3 quarter hours credit. (1948-49) 



Courses in English Bible in Other Departments 

111, 112. Old Testament History. 

Juniors, 3 quarter hours credit for each course. Dr. Kelso 

113. Inter-Testament History. 

Elective, Juniors, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Kelso 

221, 222. New Testament Introduction. 

Middlers, 3 quarter hours credit for each course. Dr. Taylor 

455. Bible Characters. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Williamson 

551. The Teaching of Jesus. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. . Dr. Karr 

751. Preaching from the Old Testament. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Shear 

754. Ezekiel and Daniel. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Shear 



34 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 

CHURCH HISTORY 
Dr. Williamson 



411. Church History, Apostolic and Ancient. From the apostolic age 
to the barbarian invasions. The Council of Jerusalem; the early Church, the 
conflicts with heathenism and heresy, doctrinal controversies; the growth of 
ritual and discipline; great church leaders. 

Juniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



412. Mediaeval Church History. Barbarian invasions; growth in influ' 
ence of the papacy; Mohammedanism; the Holy Roman Empire; the Crusades; 
monastic orders; universities; Scholasticism; Mysticism; the Renaissance. 

Juniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



422. Modern Church History. The Reformation in diflFerent countries; 
the Countei -Reformation; the Puritans; the Pietists; American churches and 
their European antecedents, their origins, leaders and influence. 

Juniors, spring term, 4 quarter hours credit. 



431. Religious Movements in America. Revivalism; anti'Christian cults: 
Christian Science, Russellism, Mormonism, Spiritualism, etc. The Group 
movements. Great American preachers. 

Seniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



432. Christian Missions. A survey of the progress of missions from the 
Apostolic days, with special emphasis on the modern missionary movement, 
beginning with William Carey. An examination of the principal mission 
fields, including those of the United Presbyterian Church. Missions in 
America. Lives of outstanding missionaries in various fields. The problems, 
methods, and opportunities of mission work. Methods of missionary in- 
struction in congregations. 

Seniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



434. Church Government. Discussion method. Principles and forms 
of church government; government and discipline of the United Presbytc 
rian Church; church courts; practical workings of church law. 

Seniors, fall term, V/x quarter hours credit. 



450. Comparative Religion. An outline of the history, beliefs, literature 
and practices of the non'Christian religions, with special emphasis on Moham' 
medanism, Hinduism, and Buddhism. Elements of strength and of weakness 
in non'Christian faiths. Complete superiority of the Christian religion. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 35 



451. The Early American Church. The European background of the 
American churches. The Puritans and Pilgrims. Persecution of Quakers, 
Baptists, etc. Roger WiUiams and rehgious Hberty. Relation of the Church 
to the developing life of the different colonies. Liberal tendencies and re' 
hgious diversities. The Great Awakening. The War of the Revolution and 
its effect on religious life. Nationalization of the churches in the United 
States. Missionary work at home and abroad. 

Elective, 1 quarter hour credit. 

453. American Church Biography. Lives and contemporary influence of 
outstanding ministers of America from colonial times to the present. Their 
methods and outstanding points of effectiveness. Great Christian laymen in 
different denominations. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

454. History of Doctrine. Influence of the Greek philosophers on Chris' 
tian thought. Christian apologetics. Development of Christology. History 
of anthropology, soteriology, eschatology, and symbols of the Church. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

455. Bible Characters. A study of many of the men and women of the 
Bible, some prominent and some obscure; an examination of their charac 
ter and the part they played for or against the plan of God; their inspiration 
or warning for today. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



36 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 

SYSTEMATIC AND BIBLICAL THEOLOGY 
Dr. Karr 

The aim of this department is to get the student well grounded in the 
doctrines of our evangelical faith. The method includes assigned readings, 
lectures, note'book work and class'room discussion. The subject is taken up in 
the following order, the first few lessons serving the purpose of orientation. 

512. Systematic Theology. (a) Introduction to Theology: the idea, 
purpose and importance of Theology; the source of material; the requisites 
to successful study; preview of the doctrinal system, (b) Revelation: the 
possibility and probability of special Revelation, the claims of Scripture, 
the credibility of the writers, various evidences of the supernatural character 
of the Bible, (c) The Inspiration of the Scriptures, as held by our Church, 
set forth and defended. 

Juniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

521. Systematic Theology, (a) The Doctrine of God: the attributes of 
the Divine Being; the tri-personality of God; the decrees and works of God, 
— creation, preservation and providence, (b) The Doctrine of Angels: their 
nature and employments. 

Middlers, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

522. Systematic Theology, (a) The Doctrine of Man: the origin and 
primitive state of man; the unity of the human race; essentials of the moral 
and spiritual nature, (b) The Doctrine of Sin: the Fall of man; the nature 
and universality of sin; the consequences of sin to mankind. 

Middlers, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

531. Systematic Theology, (a) The Doctrine of Christ the Redeemer: 
the preparation for redemption; the person of Christ, His two natures and 
states; the offices and work of Christ, with special study of the Atonement. 
(b) The Doctrine of the Holy Spirit: the application of redemption, — 
election, calling, regeneration, conversion, union with Christ, justification, 
adoption, sanctification. 

Seniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

532. Systematic Theology, (a) The Doctrine of the Church: its na- 
ture, membership, purpose and power; the sacraments of Baptism and the 
Lord's Supper, (b) The Doctrine of Last Things: death, the intermediate 
state, the second coming of Christ, the resurrection, the judgment and final 
awards. 

Seniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

550. Doctrinal Thesis. In order to enable students to meet the require 
ments of their respective presbyteries in connection with ordination, prO' 
vision is made for the preparation of a Doctrinal Thesis. This involves 
intensive study in a welhdefined field. In determining the subject, the 
student's preference is considered but his choice must have the approval 
of the department. Periodic reports of progress are required. The com- 
pleted manuscript is due on the day preceding term examinations. 

Elective. Middlers, spring term; or. Seniors, fall term; 3 quarter hours credit. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 37 



551. The Teaching of Jesus. A Biblical and inductive study. Source 
material is found in the Gospel record. The aim is to interpret and sys' 
tematize the teaching of the Master, especially concerning Himself. There 
will be classTOom lectures, and assigned subjects for inductive study. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

558. The Means of Grace. A Biblical and practical study. In the light 
of Scripture and experience, the Church and its ordinances, — the Word, 
Sacraments, and Prayer, — ^are studied with a view to a fresh appraisal of their 
value in nurturing and developing the spiritual life and in furthering Christ's 
cause upon earth. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

559. Trends in Theology. A historical and critical review of the principal 
doctrinal variations which have appeared in the past, with appropriate 
emphasis on developments from the beginning of the nineteenth century. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

560. The Doctrine of Last Things. A study in Systematic Theology for 
advanced students dealing with physical death, the intermediate state, the 
second coming of Christ, the resurrection of the dead, the final judgment 
and the Kingdom of Glory. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



38 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 

PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION AND RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

Dr. Leitch 

613. Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion. A study of special value 
for those who have had little or no philosophical training. The history of 
human thought is studied with the special emphasis on those periods when 
philosophy touches on religion or when philosophy and religion cross on com' 
mon issues. 

Juniors with inadequate philosophical background, spring term, 3 quarter 
hours credit. 

621. Christian Education. A course designed to give background for the 
modern approach to religious education. After a study of religious education 
in Biblical times and in the history of the Christian Church, attention is cen- 
tered on problems within the modern church. 

Middlers, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

631. Philosophy of Religion. An introduction to the major philosophical 
problems as they stand in relation to the claims of the Christian Faith. 
Special attention is given to the problem of the Christian Religion as a 
philosophical system. 

Seniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

633. Apologetics. The development and defense of Christianity, in which 
a survey is made of the old arguments against the Christian faith and the 
classical defenses which have been built up across the centuries. Special inter- 
est centers on the modern apologia for our faith. 

Seniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

651. Psychology of Religion. A study of the principles of psychology as 
related to religious experience. After a brief review of the general field of 
psychology, attention is given to the special psychological problems of re- 
ligion, such as mysticism, conversion, prayer, emotionalism, adolescence, 
worship, etc. Positively, the course aims toward the construction of a ma- 
ture and integrated religious experience. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

652. Organization and Administration in Educational Programs. A com- 
prehensive study of the principles and methods of educational organization 
and administration as they may be applied to specific congregational prob- 
lems. Study is made of the daily vacation Bible School, the problem of 
week-day religious education in various public school systems, and the guid- 
ance by the pastor of the church school in his own' church. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

653. Methods of Religious Teaching. Educational methods as applicable 
to church situations. The general educational methods examined critically 
for purposes of use in the special problems of the church school. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

656. Problems in Modern Christian Thought. The aim of this course is 
to indicate the chief intellectual difficulties which confront the spread of the 
Gospel in our day. This course is used as a means for bringing before the 
student the leading thinkers of the day, and their contributions to the criticism 
or establishment of the Christian faith. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 39 

PRACTICAL THEOLOGY 
Dr. Shear 



711, 712. Homiletlcs. A basic course dealing with the planning, prepara- 
tion and delivery of sermons. The meaning and importance of preaching, 
the sources of material, the types of sermons, the choice of themes and texts, 
the sermon outline, the literary style, the methods of delivery — are some 
of the matters to be dealt with. Students are required to submit weekly for 
class criticism outlines of sermons on assigned texts, and to prepare in full 
one sermon for pulpit delivery before the Faculty. 

Juniors, fall and winter terms, 3 quarter hours credit each term. 



721. Homiletlcs. Emphasis is placed in this course on expository preach' 
ing in the New Testament. The student is expected to submit for appraisal 
(a) weekly outlines of sermons on assigned texts, (b) reports on sermons by 
representative preachers in the several periods of church history, (c) one fully 
written sermon on a text chosen by the student from an assigned book of 
the New Testament, (d) one fully written sermon on a theme to be chosen 
by the student from a designated list of texts. 

Middlers, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



731. Pastoral Theology. This course introduces the student to the office 
and work of a pastor of a congregation. It deals, through lectures and dis- 
cussions, with the personality of the minister and his relations to the congrc 
gation, the community and the denomination. The student will read and sub' 
mit reviews of two books chosen from a designated list. 

Middlers, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



732. Pastoral Theology. A comprehensive course of lectures and discus- 
sions touching every phase of the pastoral relationship. It will deal with 
the pastor as a devout and humble servant of Jesus Christ, as a leader of 
public worship, as an administrator of the sacraments, as conductor of wed- 
dings and funerals, as director of Christian education, as evangelist, as mis- 
sionary leader, as organizer and administrator of church activities, as per- 
sonal counselor and visitor in homes and hospitals, as citizen in the community 
and nation. The Secretary of the Board of Administration will present a 
series of lectures dealing with the pastor's relations to the organized work 
of the denomination. 

Seniors, winter term, 4 quarter hours credit. 



750. Seminar in Sermon Compyosition. A course for advanced students 
who desire more training in the composition of sermons. Special attention 
will be given to richness of vocabulary, literary style, imaginative thought 
and use of illustration. Students submit their manuscripts for group dis- 
cussion. 

Elective, open only to advanced students who have had all required courses 
in homiletics, 3 quarter hours credit. 



40 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



751. Preaching from the Old Testament. The Scriptures which Jesus 
knew and of which he said, "These are they which bear witness of me," are 
rich mines of sermon suggestion and material. This course aims to offer 
suggestions as to themes and their development in all parts of the Old Testa' 
ment, historical, poetical and prophetical. Lectures will be supplemented 
by collateral reading and by the writing of sermons on assigned texts by 
the students. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



752. Preaching in the First Five Centuries. A study of the doctrinal and 
ethical content, the literary style, the homiletic method and the spiritual 
background of preaching in the early centuries from the days of the apostles 
to the break'Up of the Roman Empire. Largely a reading course with class 
discussions. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



754. Ezekiel and Daniel. A study of the text, the exilic background and 
the post'exilic influence of Ezekiel. Problems presented by recent criticism 
are noted. Special attention is given to the symbolism and apocalyptic 
visions of Daniel in the light of history. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 41 



Chapel Preaching 

Each student in the course of his work at the Seminary is required to 
preach three sermons (one each year) before the Faculty and student body. 
Texts or topics are assigned, and the sermons are criticised and graded on 
the basis of content, style and delivery. 



Field Work 
Six Units Required for Graduation 

A. Junior students are assigned to local churches under the direction of 
the respective pastors. The purpose is to give the student direct contact with, 
and practical experience in, the organi2;ational activities of the church. The 
work to which students are assigned varies, depending upon local conditions 
and upon the student's capacity and adaptability. Ordinarily it consists of 
teaching, visiting, working with young people, supervising boys' groups, and 
assisting in the service of music and in the conduct of public worship. The 
student worker receives a minimum of $80.00 for the school year, together 
with necessary expenses, from the church he serves. Seminars, based on 
reports from the students and the fields, are conducted from time to time, 
as occasion requires. Two units toward graduation are given for satisfactory 
work in this field. 

B. For the four additional units in field work the student is ordinarily re 
quired to spend the summer following the Middle Year (or the equivalent of 
four months), in a home mission station, or as a student pastor of a vacant 
congregation, or as a student assistant to a regular pastor. This work is under 
the joint supervision of the Secretary of the Board of American Missions, the 
Synodical Superintendent of Missions, and the Department of Practical 
Theology of the Seminary. The student will receive a minimum of $100.00 
per month, plus traveling expenses to and from his field. 

C. Middle and Senior students who, for one reason or another, wish to 
engage in extra'curricular field work during the school year, must secure 
special permission from the Faculty. No credit toward graduation will be 
given for this work, except by special action of the Faculty. 

D. Students of other denominations, in order to receive credit for similarly 
supervised field work in which they may engage, must explain the nature 
of such work to the Department of Practical Theology and secure the ap' 
proval of the Faculty. 



42 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



PUBLIC SPEAKING 
Professor Barbe 

The purpose of this department is to assist each student to increase his 
effectiveness in public address and oral reading. Speech training is required 
of each student throughout the Junior year, or until sufficient ability is shown 
to enable him to discharge the speech responsibilities of a student preacher 
satisfactorily. 

The services of this department are available to all students needing special 
help with speech problems, especially in preparing for the delivery of sermons 
before the Faculty and student body. 

A high'fidelity transcription is made of each chapel sermon for pur' 
poses of reference and study. 

811. Public Speaking. Review of fundamental principles of speech com- 
position and delivery, with frequent classroom performances, criticized by 
instructor and class. Exercises in voice production and articulation, with 
individual drills as needed. Each student makes and studies a record of 
his speech. 

Juniors, fall term, 1 quarter hour credit. 

812. Public Speaking. Continuation of voice and articulation exercises 
as required. Practice in the delivery of sermon excerpts, both original and 
selected. Emphasis is placed upon preparation for the delivery of Junior 
chapel sermons, each student being required to appear for criticism one week 
in advance of his chapel preaching. 

Juniors, winter term, 1 quarter hour credit. 

813. Public Speaking. Study of interpretative reading, particularly of 
Scripture. Introduction to microphone speaking. 

Juniors, spring term, 1 quarter hour credit. 

851. Public Speaking. A course offering speech instruction adapted to 
individual needs and interests. 

Elective, 1 quarter hour credit. 

852. Public Speakliig. Similar to Course No, 851. 
Elective, 1 quarter hour credit. 

854. Preparation for Public Speaking. Organization and clarifying of 
material; methods of improving voice and enunciation; public reading of 
the Bible; after-dinner speaking; extemporaneous addresses, etc. This course 
is only auxiliary to the work of this department. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Williamson 



Special Announcement 

During the year 1948-1949, under the auspices of the Board 
of American Missions, a series of special lectures on problems in 
the field of Home Missions will be delivered by outstanding 
authorities. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 43 



THE GRADUATE DEPARTMENT 

The Degree offered: The degree of Master of Theology 
(Th.M.) is granted to those candidates who fulfill the necessary- 
requirements, as listed below. This is an earned professional 
degree indicating advanced study and proficiency in theological 
subjects. 

Entrance Requirements: Every applicant for admission to 
the Graduate Department must make application on the form pro- 
vided for that purpose, and must present the following credentials: 
(1) A letter from the clerk of his presbytery, or corresponding 
church officer, indicating that he is a member in good standing of 
some evangelical church and is officially recommended as a student 
of theology; (2) complete official transcripts of academic credits 
beyond high school, including evidence that he holds (a) the A.B. 
degree, or an equivalent degree, from an accredited college or uni- 
versity, and (b) the B.D. degree, or an equivalent degree, from this 
or some other accredited seminary or theological school; (3) sat- 
isfactory testimonials from at least three references in response 
to the Seminary's questionnaire. One or more of these require- 
ments may be waived in cases where adequate information is al- 
ready on file in the Seminary. Acceptance as a bona fide Grad- 
uate Student will be determined by the Faculty's Graduate Studies 
Committee on the basis of complete and satisfactory credentials. 

Fields of Study: At the initiation of his graduate work, the 
student must indicate the field in which he expects to do his 
major work. The following four fields are determined: (For 
available courses, see page 26.) 

I. Biblical Literature and Interpretation. 
II. History of Church and Doctrine. 

III. Christian Education and Philosophy. 

IV. Practical Theology and Administration. 

Graduation Requirements: A total of 34 quarter hour credits 
Is required for the Master's degree, 27 credits being allowed for 
the required classroom work and 7 credits for an acceptable 
thesis. Of the 27 hours of classroom work, 18 quarter hours must 
be taken In the student's major field. The remaining 9 quarter 
hours may be elected by the student In any of the other fields. 



44 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



The class work calls for a minimum of one academic year of three 
quarters, of not less than 9 quarter hours each. The equivalent 
hours may be spread out, but the total period involved must not 
exceed three academic years except by special action of the Grad- 
uate Studies Committee of the Faculty. 

The required thesis is to be written upon some phase of the 
work in the student's major field. The subject of the thesis 
must be approved by the professor under whom the student is do- 
ing his major work, and must be delivered to the Graduate Stu- 
ies Committee at least two calendar months prior to the com- 
mencement at which the student expects to receive his degree. The 
requirements for the format of the thesis may be had from the 
student's major professor. 

Credits Transferable from other Schools: Credits for graduate 
courses taken in other theological schools or seminaries are trans- 
ferable toward the Th.M. degree, subject to the final approval of 
the Graduate Studies Committee in each individual instance; 
but such transferred credits cannot exceed 9 quarter hours in 
value. It is in all cases necessary, therefore, that a minimum of 
25 quarter hours be earned in residence. 

Time Limit: Under normal conditions, and except by special 
action of the Graduate Studies Committee to the contrary, all 
work for the degree inclusive of the thesis must be completed 
within four calendar years from the date of the student's matricu- 
lation in the Graduate Department. 

Expenses: Students will, of course, be expected to purchase 
any textbooks which their professors may require. 

The following fees and tuitions are charged to graduate 
students, both as candidates for degrees, and as auditors in the 
seminary: 

(1) Graduate Matriculation Fee, payable upon 
entrance .......$ 5.00 

(2) Regular Tuition Fee, payable upon registration 
for each quarter as follows: 

(a) For 3 courses (9 quarter hours) . . 10.00 

(b) For 2 courses (6 quarter hours) . . 8.00 

(c) For 1 course (3 quarter hours) . . 5.00 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 45 



(3) Diploma Fee, payable 15 days prior to grant- 
ing the degree . . . . . • 5.00 

Note: Graduate fees, excepting the diploma fee, are ap- 
plied in building up the Graduate Section of the Library, and 
in the purchase of other Graduate Department supplies and equip- 
ment. 

Communications: Additional information relative to the 
work of the Graduate Department, together with forms for Ap- 
plication for Admission, may be secured by addressing: 

The Department of Graduate Studies 

The Pitts bur gh-Kenia Theological Seminary 

616 West North Avenue, Pittsburgh 12, Pa. 



SUMMER INSTITUTES OF THEOLOGY 

During the summer of 1946 two Institutes of Theology were 
inaugurated under the auspices of the Seminary working in co- 
operation with the Department of War Work of the Board of 
Christian Education. The first of these Institutes was held on 
the campus of Westminster College, New Wilmington, Pa., during 
the week of June 10-15, while the second took place at Monmouth 
College, Monmouth, 111., July 1-6. Both Institutes received a 
warm welcome from the Church's regular ministry and chaplaincy. 
It was highly gratifying that nineteen of the Church's chaplains 
were able to be in attendance at New Wilmington, with a slightly 
smaller number present at Monmouth. 

The Institutes will be available to our ministers and chap- 
lains again in 1948, at New Wilmington, June 21 to 25, and at Ster- 
ling, Kansas, June 28 to July 2. Nationally recognized Christian 
leaders will again augment the regular Faculty of the Seminary 
on the teaching staffs of both Institutes. 

In the pleasant atmosphere of our colleges, with lodging in 
comfortable dormitory quarters, an ideal minister's recreational 
week is provided at a nominal cost. Here he renews old friend- 
ships with college and seminary classmates. Here he is inspired 
to renewed efforts by fresh Bible study in which his thoughts are 
led by experienced and recognized scholars. Here he finds mental 
and spiritual stimulation as he comes to grips with the problems 
facing the Church in our day. 



46 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



AFFILIATION WITH THE UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 

Graduates from the three-year course of Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Theological Seminary who desire to take the A.M. degree at the 
University of Pittsburgh in the field of Religion and Religious 
Education may transfer as many as 14 semester credits (equiva- 
lent to 21 quarter hours) from the Seminary as advanced standing 
toward this degree. The remaining ten course credits and six 
thesis credits required for the A.M. degree must be taken at the 
University of Pittsburgh. A part of the ten course credits may 
be taken in other fields of the University than Religion and Re- 
ligious Education. 

Graduates of Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary will be 
allowed a maximum of 30 graduate credits (equivalent to 45 
quarter hours) as advanced standing toward the Ph.D. degree in 
Religion and Religious Education. An additional amount of 
six graduate credits may be granted to students taking courses 
at the Seminary beyond the regular three-year theological course, 
in which cases the courses must be agreed upon by the Graduate 
School of the University of Pittsburgh. 

The University of Pittsburgh will accept graduate credits from 
Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary in the fields of Biblical 
Literature, Church History, Theology, History and Philosophy of 
Religion, and Religious Education. 

The amount of advanced graduate standing granted to Semi- 
nary students who choose to do their major work at the University 
in fields other than Religion and Religious Education will be de- 
termined by heads of these departments. The advanced standing 
for both the A.M. and Ph.D. degree will vary some with depart- 
ments and students. 

A regular summer session or semester must elapse between the 
time of the student's graduation from the Seminary and the con- 
ferring of a graduate degree by the University of Pittsburgh. 

The procedure outlined in the foregoing paragraphs became 
effective February, 1933. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 47 



THE DEPARTMENT OF CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

The Department of Christian Education opened with the Fall 
Term of 1947, as an expansion of the Department of Philosophy 
of Religion and Religious Education. Approved by the General 
Assembly of the United Presbyterian Church the preceding May, 
this Department was inaugurated to meet the growing need in our 
Church for trained lay leaders. 

The Purpose of the Department is to instruct young people, 
dedicated to full-time Christian service, in the knowledge of the 
doctrines and order of worship taught in the Scriptures and set 
forth in the standards of the United Presbyterian Church of North 
America; to assist them to grow in the Christian faith and life 
and to acquire the technical skill necessary for effective service 
in the Name and Spirit of Christ. 

Its Particular Field is the education of young women for 
church vocations as non-ministerial, professional lay workers. It 
does not enter the field of the Seminary proper in preparing 
young men for ordination. 

The Program of Training covers a period of two academic 
years, each of which is divided into three terms, or "quarters," of 
eleven weeks each. The annual session begins the second Wednes- 
day of September and continues thirty-five weeks including holi- 
days. 

Preparation for Entrance. Prospective students are urged 
to give careful attention during their college days to the Pre- 
Seminary Studies approved by the American Association of Theo- 
logical Schools and described on page 17 of this catalogue. It 
is also recommended that all applicants for entrance should qual- 
ify as good typists and pianists: for such technical skill is invalu- 
able in the field of Christian Education. 



48 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



Academic Regulations. Except in so far as expressly modi- 
fied, the Academic Regulations of the Seminary proper apply 
also to the Department of Christian Education. 

Admission. The normal time for entrance is at the beginning 
of the annual session in September. Application for admission 
should be made well in advance, on the official form, which may be 
secured from the Registrar's office. Each application should be 
accompanied by a small recent photograph of the applicant, to- 
gether with a statement of personal reasons for entering Christian 
work; and should be followed promptly by the credentials men- 
tioned below. 

Credentials. The following credentials will be required of 
each applicant for admission to the Department of Christian 
Education: 1) A Letter of Introduction from Pastor, or Session, 
testifying to Christian character, active church membership, and 
general fitness for Christian service; 2) A Letter from the Clerk 
of Presbytery, or corresponding church officer, indicating official 
acceptance as a candidate for Christian service and recommenda- 
tion as a student in the Department of Christian Education; (ap- 
plicant consult pastor as to the proper procedure); 3) Complete 
official Transcript of Academic Credits, beginning with high 
school record unless the applicant has completed two or more years 
of college work; (the degree of A.B., or an equivalent degree, 
from an accredited college or university, is required for admission) ; 
4) Satisfactory Testimonials from at least three personal refer- 
ences as indicated on the application blank. 

Classification of Students. In the two-year program of train- 
ing, regular degree students are classed as Juniors during their 
first year, and as Seniors during their second year. 

Field Work. A limited amount of Field Work, — not more 
than 10 hours per week and not less than 4 hours per week, — will 
be required of all regular degree students during both their Junior 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 49 

and Senior years. The academic value of this work, together with 
the correlated class work, is recognized in the form of 6 quarter 
hour credits applicable toward the degree. 

The Degree of Master of Religious Education will be con- 
ferred by the Seminary upon all who complete the course of study 
and training described on the following pages and therein meet 
all the requirements of the Faculty. At least one year of work 
in residence is necessary for graduation. The successful candidate 
must earn a minimum of 94 quarter hour credits and maintain 
more than average ability in every department. 

Financing the Course. In matters of expense and aid, stu- 
dents in the Department of Christian Education attend on the 
same basis as regular students in the Undergraduate Department 
of the Seminary. There is no charge for tuition, or for room rent 
except in the case of married students with families. For the 
usual academic fees, an estimate of personal expenses, and the 
amount of aid to be expected from the Board of Christian Educa- 
tion, see page 63. 



50 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



CURRICULUM OF CHRISTIAN EDUCATION IN OUTLINE 



Junior Year 



Fall Term. 



Winter Term 



912 Worship and Music 

918 Field Work Practicum 

102 Geography of Bible Lands 

311 The Gospels 

502 Survey of Theology 

652 Organization & Administration 
in Educational Programs 



Spring Term 



913 Christian Education of Adults 

919 Field Work Practicum 

103 Survey of 0. T. History 

203 Survey of N. T. Introduction 

312 The Life of Christ 
— Elective 



Qr. 

Hrs. 



911 Christian Educa. of Children 3 

914 Thesis Research 1 

917 Field Work Practicum 1 

215 Biblical Interpretation 3 

301 Survey of English Bible 3 

621 Christian Education 3 

811 Public Speaking 1 

15 



Qr. 
Hrs. 



3 
1 
3 
3 
3 

3 
16 



Qr. 

Hrs. 



3 
1 
3 
3 
3 
3 
16 



Senior Year 



Fall Term 



Winter Term 



925 Thesis 

928 Field Work Practicum 

331 Eighth Century Prophets 

402 Survey of Church History 

702 Personal Evangelism 

— Elective 



Spring Term 



926 Thesis 

929 Field Work Practicum 

434 Church Government 

633 Apologetics 

— Electives 

Total Quarter Credit Hours 



Note: Typing_ and Piano will be provided for those students who are not pro- 
ficient in them. 

Required courses are described on the following pages. 

Elective courses are described in the Curriculum of the Undergraduate 

Department. 



Qr. 

Hrs. 



921 Christian Educa. of Adolescents 
924 Church Drama (Given with 201) 
927 Field Work Practicum 
201 Church Art 
322 Poetical Books 
432 Christian Missions 
— Elective 



Qr. 

Hrs. 



3 
1 
3 
3 
3 
3 
16 



Qr. 

Hrs. 



3 
1 
2 
3 
6 
IS 
94 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 51 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

Dr. Leitch Miss Lewis 

621. Christian Education. A course designed to give background for the 
modern approach to religious education. After a study of religious education 
in Biblical times and in the history of the Christian Church, attention is cen' 
tered on problems within the modern church. 

Juniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Leitch 

633. Apologetics. The development and defense of Christianity, in which 
a survey is made of the old arguments against the Christian faith and the 
classical defenses which have been built up across the centuries. Special inter' 
est centers on the modern apologia for our faith. 

Seniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Leitch 

652. Organization and Administration in Educational Programs. A com' 
prehensive study of the principles and methods of educational organization 
and administration as they may be applied to specific congregational prob- 
lems. Study is made of the Daily Vacation Bible School, the problem of 
week-day religious education in various public school systems, and the guid- 
ance by the pastor of the church school in his own church. 

Juniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Leitch 

911. Christian Education of Children. A study of the total Christian 
Education Program for Children from Pre-School through the Junior De- 
partment. Methods, Materials, and Organization for teaching the Christian 
Religion to children are stressed. Introduced by a background study of the 
psychological developments of the child and his correlated religious needs. 
(Alternates with No. 921). 

Juniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. Miss Lewis 

912. Worship and Music. A practical course dealing with the elements 
of public worship. It includes an outline of the historical background of 
worship; emphasis on the importance of music to worship and the selection of 
hymns and Scripture; and practice in developing and leading worship, both 
formal and informal. Special reference to plans and programs for Church 
School. 

Juniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. Miss Lewis 

913. Christian Education of Adults. A study of the Church's program 
for Adults, with emphasis on adult needs and problems, and methods that 
will meet those needs. Discussion on the Church and the Home, and Parent 
Education. 

Juniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. Miss Lewis 

914. Thesis Research. This course is designed to acquaint the first 
year class with the various types of educational research and to prepare each 
student to do creditable research in the field selected for specific study. 
(Pre-requisite to Thesis credit). 

Juniors, fall term, 1 quarter hour credit. Miss Lewis 



52 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



917, 918, 919. Field Work Practicum. A class forum based on field work 
problems and the practical application of classroom teaching. Credit for 
these courses is given at the end of the school year upon the successful com' 
pletion of the Field Work, required written reports, and regular conferences. 

Juniors, fall, winter and spring; 1 quarter hour credit each term. Miss Lewis 

921. Christian Education of Adolescents. A look at the Adolescent, — 
his psychological background and his religious needs, — and a study of the 
available material and methods for use with youth groups. (Alternates with 
No. 911). 

Seniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. Miss Lewis 

924. Church Drama. A course in the use of Drama in the Christian Ed' 
ucation program. The work includes discussion of the problems of produc' 
tion, and practice in directing, acting, and stage makeup. (Given with 
No. 201). 

Seniors, fall term, 2 quarter hours credit. Miss Lewis 

925, 926. Thesis for Degree of M. R. E. The satisfactory completion 
of a research project is one of the requirements for the Degree of Master 
of Religious Education. The subject and tentative outline of the thesis must 
be officially approved not later than April 1st of the first year of residence. 
Regularly scheduled conferences with the advisor are required during the 
progress of this research. The completed thesis must be turned in not later 
than March 1st preceding the granting of the degree. Two bound type 
written copies of the thesis must be deposited in the Seminary Library at 
least two weeks before the date of graduation. 

Seniors, winter and spring; 3 quarter hours credit each term. Miss Lewis 

927, 928, 929. Field Work Seminar. Second year forum on the practical 
application of the principles taught. Discussion of practical points in Church 
Office Administration, with special attention to records and the use of the 
mimeograph; followed by discussion of leadership, professional ethics and 
the social requirements of the profession. 

Seniors, fall, winter and spring; 1 quarter hour credit each term. Miss Lewis 



Courses in the Curriculum of Christian Education 
given by other Professors 

102. Geography of Bible Lands. A survey course correlating the major 
geographical features of the ancient orient with Biblical history, and dealing 
more fully with the geography of Palestine in relation to the history, cus' 
toms and manners of its peoples. 

Juniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Kelso 

103. Survey of Old Testament History. A study of the history of the 
Hebrews from the days of Abraham to the close of the Old Testament, with 
special emphasis on the more significant personalities, events, and institu- 
tions. Relevant archaeological data are studied in conjunction with the 
Biblical record. 

Juniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Kelso 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 53 



201. Church Art. (a) A rapid survey of the development of the Chris' 
tian church building with elucidation of those features which became pecu' 
liarly characteristic of Christian architecture. (b) A brief introduction to 
Christian Symbology. (c) A rapid survey of Christian painting and decor- 
ation from the catacomb murals to the Renaissance. (Given with No. 924). 

Seniors, fall term, 1 quarter hour credit. Dr. Taylor 

203. Survey of New Testament Introduction, (a) The Graeco'Roman 
World as a setting for the New Testament literature, (b) The development 
and content of the New Testament literature: i) the Pauline letters, ii) the 
Gospels and the Acts, iii) the other Epistles, iv) the Revelation. Brief 
treatment will be accorded the Synoptic and Johannine problems and Chris' 
tian apocalyptic. 

Juniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Taylor 

215. Biblical Interpretation, (a) The Oriental Mind: Jesus was an Ori' 
ental. Who ministered and preached to Orientals. Adequate interpretation 
of Scripture, therefore, demands an understanding of Oriental, and particularly 
Semitic, psychology and logic. A study is made of them, using the Scrip' 
tures and contemporary literature, together with experiences from modern 
Oriental life, for documentation. Lectures, readings, and discussion. (b) 
Hermeneutics proper: A review of the history of interpretation in the Church, 
with a determination of the principles of sound exegesis as exemplified in the 
grammatico-historical method. Lectures and discussion. 

Juniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Taylor 

301. Survey of the English Bible. This course will include (a) an intro' 
duction to the English Bible designed to give the student a working knowl' 
edge of the Book by examining the diversity and interrelation of constituent 
parts and the contribution each makes to the whole; and (b) a study of the 
history of the English Bible, in which will be reviewed the early manuscript 
versions, Jerome and the Vulgate, Wyclif, Tyndale and Coverdale, the Rheims 
and Douay Bibles, the King James Version and its influence on British and 
American history, the British and American Revisions, and modern versions. 

Juniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Long 

311. The Gospels. There will be literary and historical study of the 
Gospels, covering their general features, a survey of their content and the 
relation of the Synoptics to the Fourth Gospel. Critical questions in con- 
nection with the Gospels will be studied in Course No. 221. 

Juniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Long 

312. The Life of Christ. The life of Christ will be studied on the basis 
of the materials contained in the Gospels, — His birth, baptism, temptation, 
self'consciousness, teachings, miraculous activity, crucifixion, resurrection 
and ascension. 

Juniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Long 

322. The Poetical Books. This course is designed to provide (a) a general 
introduction to the poetry and wisdom writings of the ancient Hebrews; (b) 
a comprehensive survey of the Psalter; and (c) an analysis of Job, Ecclc 
siastes and the Song of Songs. 

Seniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Long 



54 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



.331. The Eighth Century Prophets. There will be (a) a general survey 
of prophetism in Israel, its origin and development from earliest times to the 
time of the canonical prophets; (b) historical introduction to the Prophets 
of the Eighth Century, B.C.; and (c) a detailed study of Amos, Hosea, 
Micah and Isaiah. Attention will be given to the social ethics of these 
prophecies and their bearings on contemporary life. 

Seniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Long or Dr. Leitch. 



402. Survey of Church History. A rapid review of the History of the 
Church dealing with persons, events, and movements of outstanding im' 
portance from the time of the Apostles to the present day. 

Seniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Williamson 



432. Christian Missions. A survey of the progress of missions from the 
Apostolic days, with special emphasis on the modern missionary movement, 
beginning with William Carey. An examination of the principal mission 
fields, including those of the United Presbyterian Church. Missions in 
America. Lives of outstanding missionaries in various fields. The problems, 
methods, and opportunities of mission work. Methods of missionary in- 
struction in congregations. 

Seniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Williamson 



434. Church Government. Discussion method. Principles and forms 
of church government; government and discipline of the United Presbyterian 
Church; church courts; practical workings of church law. 

Seniors, spring term, 2 quarter hours credit. Dr. Williamson 



502. Survey of Theology. By class room lectures supplemented by out' 
side reading, the great articles of our faith are brought under review with 
intent to give the student an intelligent grasp of the Christian system of 
thought. The treatment throughout is positive, doctrine being grounded in 
Scripture and evaluated in terms of Christian faith and life. 

Juniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Karr 



702. Personal Evangelism. The aim of this course is to prepare seminary 
students, both men and women, to be themselves personal evangelists, and 
to lead in congregational or community campaigns of visitation evangelism. 
Some attention will be given to history and biography, but the chief stress 
will be laid on methods of organizing and carrying through both intensive 
and continuing evangelistic projects. 

Seniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Shear 



811. Public Speaking. Review of fundamental principles of speech com- 
position and delivery, with frequent classroom performances, criticized by 
instructor and class. Exercises in voice production and articulation, with 
individual drills as needed. Each student makes and studies a record of 
his speech. 

Juniors, fall term, 1 quarter hour credit. Professor Barbe 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 55 



FACILITIES FOR STUDY 



THE SEMINARY LIBRARY 

The Seminary Library comprising over 40,000 volumes is 
adequately housed within the Seminary building. The library 
facilities were completely renovated and modernized when the 
Pittsburgh and Xenia Seminaries were merged in 1930. The Main 
Reference Room, immediately to the left as one enters the build- 
ing, was furnished with the most up-to-date equipment by the 
Sixth United Presbyterian Church of Pittsburgh as an expression 
of its continuing interest in the Seminary. Significant panels, in 
which the artist has portrayed the historic insignia of the older 
Presbyterian and Reformed Churches of the world, decorate the 
upper walls of the room, reminding the student of his ecclesias- 
tical heritage. There is also the Periodical Room where the finest 
current magazines of popular and general Christian interest are 
to be found, while the more technical theological and Biblical 
journals are available in the Main Reference Room. There are 
also ample stack rooms with steel shelving and a commodious 
vault for rare and historic books and documents. 

An increasingly large investment in both new and older out- 
of-print books is being made by the Seminary each year. A 
Booklist of the year's accessions is published annually in May. 
Gifts of both books and money from the many friends of the 
Seminary are received annually and are very greatly appreciated. 

The Newburgh Collection 

The research department of the Library contains the now 
priceless collection of classic theological works, many of which 
date from the early days of printing and from the Reformation, 
which were secured abroad by the Rev. John M. Mason, D.D., in 
connection with the founding of the Seminary of New York, after- 
wards the Newburgh Seminary. 

The James Law Library Fund 

Through the liberality of the late James Law, Esq., of Shus- 
han, N. Y., there was conveyed to the Seminary several years ago 
the sum of $15,000, to be employed as a library endowment. The 
'nterest from this sum augments annual purchases. 



56 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



The Nina S. Brittain Collection 

Through the generosity of Frank J, Brittain, Esq., of Erie, 
Pennsylvania, the sum of ^5,000 is to be used over a period of 
years for the direct purchase of theological and related works. These 
books are known as the Nina S. Brittain Collection. 

Library Hours 

The Library is open week days to all, without restriction of 
creed, subject to the same rules as those which apply to students. 
The hours are 9 A.M. to 1 P.M., and 2 to 5:30 P.M., excepting 
Saturday when the closing hour is 12 noon. When the Seminary 
is in session the Library is also open evenings, Monday through 
Friday, from 7 to 10 P.M. 

THE BIBLE LANDS MUSEUM 

The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary is one of the 
most active seminaries in the world engaged in archaeological 
research of Bible times in ancient Palestine. In conjunction with 
the American School of Oriental Research at Jerusalem, it has 
conducted explorations at Sodom and Gomorrah in 1924, excava- 
tions at Kirjath-Sepher in 1926, 1928, 1930, 1932, and excava- 
tions at Bethel in 1934. 

This work was inaugurated by the late Dr. M. G. Kyle, 
formerly Professor of Biblical Archaeology, who served as presi- 
dent of all these expeditions with the exception of the last: it 
was conducted after his death as a memorial to his work in 
Palestinian archaeology. The share of these antiquities which 
the Palestinian Archaeological Museum has allotted to the Semi- 
nary has been shipped to Pittsburgh, where more than a thousand 
of these objects are now on exhibit. Numerous other valuable 
pieces are awaiting special preparation before being placed on 
exhibition. 

These objects all illustrate In the most striking way the life 
of the people of Bible Lands, and so become of great value for 
interpretation as well as for apologetics. They illumine and 
corroborate the Biblical narratives. Thus an ineffaceable impres- 
sion is made upon the student of the trustworthiness of the Biblical 
record, for only real events leave anything to be dug up out of the 
ground. The objects In the Museum are used constantly In the 
classes of the Seminary. Opportunity is also afforded the public 
to visit the Museum at appointed times. 

Special gifts of archaeological specimens are being constantly 
added to the Museum through Interested friends. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 57 



CULTURAL ADVANTAGES 



THE DENOMINATIONAL SEMINARY 
The denominational Seminary has peculiar advantages. Being 
under direct church control, it certifies its graduates as trained by 
thoroughly responsible teachers. The established standards are 
maintained, and approved educational methods are followed. 
Without dwarfing individuality, the church school gives to its 
graduates the unique stamp which wins recognition within denomi- 
national bounds. At the same time, the commingling of students 
from various evangelical bodies tends to develop in them a mu- 
tual understanding and brotherly regard. The wide range of ac- 
quaintance with the Church and its leaders secured by attendance 
at the Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary is also for the student an asset 
of great value. 

A METROPOLITAN ENVIRONMENT 
Pittsburgh has numerous elements of cultural value, chief 
among which are her schools and churches. The church life of our 
own and other denominations in Pittsburgh is of the best. The city 
and its environs, including more than eighty of our own congrega- 
tions, afford an excellent example of the Church at work. In all 
the denominations the religious thought is conservative and the 
methods of work progressive. The pulpits are well manned and 
the work generally well organized. Some of the ablest preachers 
of our own and other churches are located here. The student has 
opportunity to study the methods of men who are widely known 
as successful ministers. He may see mission work carried on along 
improved lines, and engage in it himself. He may study at first 
hand the most effective methods of Sabbath-school and Young 
People's work. He is welcomed to the weekly meetings of the 



local ministerial unions, where live problems and issues are the <-> (y- 
subjects of discussion. <^wJJw' 



/^/' 



„rV>K 

Pittsburgh, together with the contiguous towns, is one of the 
great commercial centers of the world. It affords unexcelled oppor- 
tunities for the study of social, economical, political, racial, and 
other problems. It is in itself an education to live and work in such 
a city and catch the pulse of its busy life. Moreover, the benefit 
of contact with those engaged in the varied forms of work for social, 
moral and religious betterment, and of personal experience in such 
efforts is evident to all. 



58 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



THE ALLEGHENY OBSERVATORY 

The Observatory is one of the oldest astronomical institutions 
in the country. It is affiliated with the University of Pittsburgh, 
but is located in Riverview Park, one of the highest points in 
Allegheny County. By special arrangements with the Director, 
the students of the Seminary have free access to it and the privilege 
of observing the heavens through its famous lenses. The stellar 
photographs are thrown on the screen, and these and the Instru- 
ments and their workings explained to the students. 



THE BUHL PLANETARIUM 

Of the five planetaria In America, Pittsburgh now claims the 
finest and most up-to-date. Provided by the Buhl Foundation at 
a cost of over a million dollars, the Buhl Planetarium and Institute 
of Popular Science is located between the Post Office and the 
Carnegie Library, North Side, within a few minutes' walk of the 
Seminary. Its most distinctive feature Is the Theatre of the Stars 
under the large dome which crowns the building. Here, by means 
of the Intricate Zeiss projector, the lecturer can give to 450 visitors 
at once a realistic view of the heavens as they appear from any 
part of the earth at any time. In addition to the central auditor- 
ium, there are six galleries for scientific exhibits in which the 
various achievements of science are vividly set forth. A lecture 
hall, seating 250, has modern equipment for sound-motion pic- 
tures, lantern slides and demonstration experiments. Four well- 
equipped work rooms are provided for the Amateur Astronomers' 
Association of Pittsburgh. Fall, winter, and spring short-term 
evening classes In science are offered for laymen. High School 
Science Demonstration Lectures, the School Science Fair, Eighth 
Grade Conducted Tours, and the Congress for science students, 
are some of the school activities provided by the Planetarium. 
Mr. Arthur L. Draper Is the Director of this unique institution 
of education and culture. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 59 



LIFE AT THE SEMINARY 



THE SEMINARY BUILDING 

The Seminary hall is located at the corner of North Avenue 
and Buena Vista Street, and overlooks West Park. On the first 
floor are the Mary J. Stevenson Reception Room, the President's 
Office, the Pressly Chapel, the Library, the Reference and Reading 
Rooms, and the Gymnasium. On the second floor are the Faculty 
Conference Room, the Bible Lands Museum, and five classrooms 
of ample proportions. The third, fourth and fifth floors are 
given over to dormitory uses. The dining room and kitchen are 
on the fifth floor. 



ACCOMMODATIONS FOR UNMARRIED MEN 

The dormitory rooms are arranged as follows : there are single 
rooms; suites of double rooms, in which two men occupy a study 
and a bedroom in common; and suites of three rooms, in which 
two men have a study in common and two single bedrooms ad- 
joining. There is a trunk room on the third floor. Each floor has 
bathrooms and lavatories. The Seminary provides furniture and 
bedding, including sheets, pillow cases, and one blanket for each 
bed. Students should bring extra blankets for their own use. 
Students will also furnish towels for their own use and provide 
for the laundering of these. All other dormitory laundry work 
will be looked after by the Seminary. 

With the purpose of contributing to the comfort and health 
of the students, the oversight and maintenance of the rooms in the 
dormitory are placed in charge of a Committee of women appointed 
by the Board of Directors. Rooms are inspected from time to 
time. The ordinary supervision and control of the dormitory 
is committed to the President's Secretary. 

Rooms are provided free of charge to students who take not 
less than twelve hours of concurrent Seminary work. Rooms 
are assigned by the President's Secretary, reasonable consider- 
ation being given to the student's preference and to the date of 
his application for living quarters. 



60 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



APARTMENTS FOR MARRIED STUDENTS 
The fifth floor of the Seminary building contains several 
two and three-room apartments which are available at a nominal 
charge to married students without children. Heat and light are 
supplied, but there are no individual cooking facilities. Men and 
their wives are, therefore, required to take their meals with the 
Student Eating Club which is located on the same floor. For men 
with children, the two stone buildings immediately adjacent to 
the Seminary on North Avenue are now available. In these build- 
ings, which have been completely remodeled into apartment struc- 
tures, the Seminary provides housekeeping accommodations for 
nine families at a nominal rental. Prospective students may re- 
quest that their names be placed upon the waiting list for either 
type of apartment, by addressing the Secretary to the President. 

ROOMS FOR YOUNG WOMEN 
Suitable housing for young women in the Department of 
Christian Education will be provided by the Seminary. 

GROUP INSURANCE 
Unmarried students in the dormitory and married students 
occupying Seminary apartments are protected against personal 
loss by fire in the amount of ^300 and $500 respectively. A 
premium of $1.50 per single student and $2.25 per married stu- 
dent covers the cost for three years. This item is included in the 
Entrance Deposit. 

THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF THE SEMINARY 
Adequate provision is made for the maintenance and develop- 
ment of the religious life. In addition to the private devotions of 
the men, there are various gatherings for social worship. Daily 
Chapel services are held under the direction of the Faculty. A 
Seminary Communion Service Is held in the Pressly Chapel soon 
after the opening of the session in the fall; and a similar service, 
especially for the Senior Class, is held during commencement week. 
The Day of Prayer for Educational Institutions is observed each 
year with appropriate exercises. "Family worship" is conducted 
by the students daily after the evening meal, and members 
of the student body take their turn In leading Chapel devotions 
in connection with their Chapel preaching service. The local 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 61 



group of volunteers for the mission fields does much to keep 
alive and active the missionary spirit. 

During a recent year, the students, of their own volition and at 
their own expense, fitted up an attractive Worship Room in the 
building, as a place of quiet retirement for religious meditation, 
and where worship is held every week-night at 10 o'clock. 

THE SOCIAL LIFE OF THE SEMINARY 

A social hour under the auspices of the Women's Dormitory 
Committee follows the Chapel service on the opening day of the 
Seminary year. Soon after the opening of the session, the Student 
Association arranges a reception for the new students. This is 
usually held in one of the local churches. Other social affairs are 
held at the option of the students during the year. For general 
social purposes there is a room set aside in the Seminary. The 
different congregations of the city invite the students to come to 
their socials and share their hospitality. 

THE WEBSTER MEMORIAL FORUM 

The Webster Memorial Forum is a student organization 
which meets at stated times for the discussion of pre-arranged 
subjects. It usually has a speaker whose address is correlated 
with open discussion. The organization originated in a desire on 
the part of the students for a closer fellowship between the student 
body and the Faculty. Dr. John Hunter Webster, formerly Profes- 
sor of New Testament Language and Literature, was asked to 
sponsor this Forum. After his death in 1933, the organization 
called itself the "Webster Memorial Forum" in honor of the one 
who had given substantial help to the students in their initial 
problems and discussions. 

MUSICAL OPPORTUNITY 

The Praise Service of the Church has long been a profound 
interest of the United Presbyterians. Pittsburgh is one of the 
major musical centers of America, having its own famed Symphony 
Orchestra, and such singing groups as the Mendelssohn Choir, 
the Bach Choir, and the Opera Society. Seminary students who 
can pass entrance tests have been singing in these organizations 
for many years. 



62 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



Varying with the numbers and gifts of students in attendance, 
there has been a Chorus of Seminary men who sing for their own 
pleasure and development and have presented programs to our 
local churches. 

A library of several hundred musical classics for male voices 
is available for singing groups. 



PHYSICAL CULTURE 

In the fall and spring, outdoor sports hold first place. The 
city tennis courts in the park, two minutes' walk from the Semi- 
nary may be used. The Seminary gymnasium provides additional 
opportunity for physical training. 

The Allegheny Y. M. C. A. is located beside the Seminary. 
With its splendid physical equipment, — gymnasium, bowling 
alleys, showers, and swimming pool, — it offers a fine opportunity 
to the men o-f the Seminary, all of whom have free membership 
in it. Provision is made for a variety of games. A physical 
examination is required of all who use the "Y" facilities. 



EXPENSES 

Rooms and accommodations provided by the Seminary, and 
the terms on which they are available, are discussed on pages 
59 and 60. Students who elect private lodgings must meet their 
own rental expenses. 

A dining room, located on the fifth floor of the dormitory, 
offers student board at cost. Although much of the equipment 
has been provided by the Seminary, the dining room is under the 
administration of the student body, and is practically self-sup- 
porting. With a view to the proper maintenance of equipment 
and its gradual replacement as that becomes necessary, the Club 
is accumulating a special fund, known as the sinking fund, to 
which each member contributes $3.00 a year. A limited number 
of students receive their board in compensation for their services 
as waiters. An initial deposit of $30.00 is required of each stu- 
dent to defray the bills of the first period. Each bill is for a 
four-week period. The average weekly cost throughout the year is 



Student Expenses 




. ^5.00 


Books & Sup. (est.) 


. $110.00 


. 5.00 


Board (est.) 


. 300.00 


. 5.00 


Laundry (est.) 


70.00 


. 5.00 


Care Fare (est.) . 


70.00 


. 4.00 


Incidentals (est.) 


50.00 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 63 



approximately $7.50 for a week of five and one-half days. The 
cost of food over the week ends is included in the estimate below. 
All men rooming in the building are required to take their meals 
in the Seminary dining hall. 

The Board of Christian Education of the United Presbyterian 
Church, through its retail department, the United Presbyterian 
Book Store, furnishes all text books at a reduction of twenty per 
cent; other books at a reduction of ten per cent. The Board also 
grants reasonable credit to students under presbyterial super- 
vision, where they are unable to make immediate payment. 



"Matriculation Fee 
*Entrance Deposit 
*Diploma Fee (Seniors) 
*Cap & Gown (Seniors) 
Student Association Fee 
(* Items starred are required only once; all others represent annual expenses). 

Self-Support and Student Aid 

Students are urged and encouraged to maintain a maximum 
degree of financial independence. Self-reliance, rather than the 
expectation of special favors, is held up as the norm throughout 
life for servants of the Church as well as other members of society. 
However, for those students who find it impossible to finance all 
of their Seminary course, a modest amount of aid is available. 

The Board of Education Aid 

The General Assembly authorizes the presbyteries to recom- 
mend worthy students for grants from the Board of Education. 
The maximum authorized for 1947-1948 was as follows: $130 to 
students of the first year, $120 to second-year students, and $90 
to third-year students. These grants are made only to students 
who attend the United Presbyterian Seminary. 

Student Aid Fund 

There is a limited fund at the disposal of the Seminary for the 
assistance of needy students. This fund is provided for emergency 
cases only and is administered under the careful supervision of the 
Faculty. 



64 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



THE STUDENT ASSOCIATION 

The Student Association is the official organization of the 
student body. Its constitution states that the purpose of the 
Association shall be to promote the spirit of unity, self-govern- 
ment, social and spiritual welfare of the students, and to main- 
tain a sympathetic understanding and close cooperation with 
the Faculty. The Student Board, the governing agency of the 
Association, is composed of the President of the Eating Club, 
the Secretary of the Preaching Association, a representative 
from each class, and a member at large. Dues of 50 cents a 
month are assessed to cover student activity. This association 
was formally organized in December, 1945. 



THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

All who have been enrolled as students of The Pittsburgh- 
Xenia Theological Seminary or its constituent institutions are en- 
titled to membership. The object of the Association is to cherish 
the memories of Seminary life, to maintain an active interest in 
Seminary affairs, and to promote the welfare of the Seminary and 
the Church. A business meeting, followed by a social hour and 
banquet. Is held each year in connection with the Commencement 
Exercises. The business meeting Is held In the First Church, 
North Side, Pittsburgh, at 4:00 P. M. of Commencement Day. At 
this time the Association elects officers to serve for the ensuing 
year. The business meeting Is followed by a social hour culminat- 
ing in the Alumni Banquet at 5:30 P. M, Alumni and friends of 
the Seminary are urged to attend. 

All members are requested to send to the Seminary Library 
copies of such books, pamphlets and Important magazine articles 
as they may have published. 

The officers of the Alumni Association are: the Rev. Arthur 
R. Armstrong, D.D., President; the Rev. H. Andrew Bruder, Vice- 
President; and the Rev. L. Roy Lash, D.D., Secretary-Treasurer. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



65 



AWARDS GRANTED, 1946-1947 



Degree of Bachelor of Divinity 

Class of September, 1946 
Malcolm Smith Alexander ..... Culver City, Calif. 
A.B., University of Southern California, 1933 
LL.B., University of Southern California Law School, 1936 
Los Angeles Presbytery 

Robert Mason Barnes ....... Akron, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1944 
Muskingum Presbytery 



WiLLARD McCuLLOCH MoRRIS 

A.B., Sterling College, 1937 
Colorado Presbytery 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 



Class of May, 1947 

J. Rodney Beal Bellevue, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1945 
Allegheny Presbytery 

Dale Edwin Brehmer ....... Loveland, Colo. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1945 
Colorado Presbytery 

William Paul Cooke ....... Columbus, Ohio 

A.B., Texas Christian University, 1945 
Xenia Presbytery 

James Isaiah Davis Henderson, N. C. 

A.B., Knoxville College, 1944 
Tennessee Presbytery 

Ralph McGranahan Donaldson ..... Beaver, Pa. 
A.B., Westminster College, 1945 
Beaver Valley Presbytery 

Wesley Glenn Jones King Hill, Idaho 

A.B., College of Idaho, 1944 
Idaho Presbytery 

Robert Harlan Meneilly ...... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1945 
Monongahela Presbytery 

John Leonard McCreight New Concord, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1945 
Muskingum Presbytery 

Paul Morgan Musser Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio 

A.B., Westminster College, 1945 
Cleveland Presbytery 



66 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



Scholarships and Prizes 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship (not to exceed 
Alexander. 



to Mr. Malcolm Smith 



The Jane Hogg Gardner Scholarship (not to exceed $200) to Mr. Willard 
McCulloch Morris. 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Award to Mr. Malcolm Smith Alexander. 

Graduation Ho'Nors: Cum Laude, to Mr. Malcolm Smith Alexander, Mr. Willard 
McCulloch Morris, and Mr. John Leonard McCreight. 

The James Purdy Scholarships (six in number, not to exceed $50 each) to the 
following Juniors: Willard Kyle George, Robert Lee Lanning, Jr., Harvey 
Milton Luce, Robert Hall Mayo, Frank William Montgomery, and Peter 
Van Lierop. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS, 1947-1948 



Senior Class 

Cletus Valentine Baker .... 

T A.B., Tarkio College, 1945 

Illinois Southern Presbytery 

Charles Raymond Graham . . . . 

^ A.B., Sterling College, 1942 

Xenia Presbytery 

Warwick Wallace Hutchison 

A.B., Westminster College, 1946 
Monongahela Presbytery 

Kenneth Virgil Kettlewell .... 
A.B., Muskingum College, 1945 
Muskingum Presbytery 

Earl Wilford Lighthall .... 
A.B., Syracuse University, 1936 
Pittsburgh Conference, The Methodist Church 

Robert Hall Mayo ..... 
A.B., Monmouth College, 1942 
Allegheny Presbytery 

Frank William Montgomery 
5 A.B., Sterling College, 1940 

Kansas City Presbytery 



Gerald Le Roy Selby 

A.B., Sterling College, 1946 
Arkansas Valley Presbytery 

Ernest George Smith 

A.B., Buena Vista College (la.), 1942 
Des Moines Presbytery 



Percy, 111. 

Columbus, Ohio 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

New Concord, Ohio 

Murrysville, Pa. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Topeka, Kansas 

Benkelman, Nebr. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Thelological Seminary 



67 



Middle Class 

Eugene Hoopes Ammon ...... New Wilmington, Pa. 

B.S, Sterling College, 1941 ^ 

Mercer Presbytery 

Joseph Harold Anderson ....... Butler, Pa. 

B.B.A., Westminster College, 1946 
Butler Presbytery 

William Henry Anderson, Jr. ...... Dover, N. J. 

A.B., Wheaton College, 1946 
New York Presbytery 

Russell Allen Arthur ....... Cambridge, Ohio 

B.Sc, Ohio State University, 1941 
Allegheny Presbytery 

Kenneth Lloyd Beams ....... Oneonta, N. Y. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1938 
Delaware Presbytery 

Gordon Earl Boak ........ McDonald, Pa. 

B.S., Muskingum College, 1942 
Chartiers Presbytery 

Jay William Brewer ....... Washington, Iowa ^^ 

B.S., Sterling College, 1944 ^ 

Keokuk Presbytery 

Willard Kyle George . . . . . . . Youngstown, Ohio 

B.S., Westminster College, 1936 
Cleveland Presbytery 

Francis Bruce Johnston ..... New Wilmington, Pa. 
A.B., Westminster College, 1941 
Mercer Presbytery 

Robert Lee Lanning, Jr. ..... . Noblestown, Pa. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1942 
Monongahela Presbytery 

Harvey Milton Luce ....... Collyer, Kans. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1946 > 

Kansas City Presbytery 

James Gardiner McConnell ..... New York 10, N. Y. 
A.B., Monmouth College, 1946 
Monongahela Presbytery 

Leonard Arden McCulloch ....... Geneva, Ohio 

B.S., Monmouth College, 1939 
Cleveland Presbytery 

James Foster Reese ....... Harrodsburg, Ky. 

B.S., Knoxville College, 1946 
Tennessee Presbytery 

Paul Harvey Sutton Drayton Plains, Mich. 4^ 

A.B., Sterling College, 1946 ^ 

Detroit Presbytery 

Peter Van Lierop . Detroit, Mich. 

A.B., Hope College, 1946 
Detroit Presbytery 



68 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 

The Junior Class 

William Bikle Anderson ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1947 
Cleveland Presbytery 

William Earl Butler . St. Louis, Mo. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1948 
Illinois Southern Presbytery 

Mark Hilton Caldwell Houston, Pa. 

;S B.S., Sterling College, 1947 

Chartiers Presbytery 

*r Kenneth George Carey ........ Lenox, Iowa 

A.B., Tarkio College, 1939 
College Springs Presbytery 

Delbert Wayne Icenogle ....... Monmouth, 111. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1947 
Monmouth Presbytery 

Robert Merwin Jones ....... Floral Park, N. Y. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1947 
New York Presbytery 

Fulton Clark Kissick ...... New Wilmington, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1940 
Mercer Presbytery 

Russell Roy Lester ........ Grove City, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1947 
Butler Presbytery 

Carl Howard Noble Wheeling, W. Va. 

Senior, West Liberty College 
Monongahela Presbytery 

Thomas Lewis Patton, Jr. ...... . New Castle, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1941 
Mercer Presbytery 

Edward James Pitz ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1947 
Monongahela Presbytery 

Howard Eugene Rosebaugh ....... Mars, Pa. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1947 
Allegheny Presbytery 

James Ralston Shott ........ Oakmont, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1947 
Monongahela Presbytery 

Frederick Stewart Oak Park, 111. 

Senior, Monmouth College 
Chicago Presbytery 

Clarence Leroy Thomas ........ Akron, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1947 
Muskingum Presbytery 

Louise Hannah Ward ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1947 
Pittsburgh Conference, The Methodist Church 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 69 



Edmond Irving Watkins Drayton Plains, Mich. 

^^ A.B., Sterling College, 1947 

Detroit Presbytery 

Part-time Students 

Jack Claude Carr Des Moines, Iowa 

A.B., Sterling College, 1947 
Des Moines Presbytery 

John Carson Cogley ......... Manor, Pa. 

A.B., Taylor University, 1946 

Pittsburgh Conference, The Methodist Church 

Watson Stanley Custer Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Geneva College, 1946 

Pittsburgh Conference, The Methodist Church 

Paul James Halstead . Greensburg, Pa. 

B.Mus., Westminster Choir College, 1943 
Pittsburgh Conference, The Evangelical Church 

Ralph Newell ........ Ellwood City, Pa. 

A.B., Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1943 
Th.B., Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1943 
Beaver Association, The Northern Baptist Convention 

Murray Henry Russell ...... Grandview, Wash. 

A.B., Seattle Pacific College, 1947 
Puget Sound Presbytery 

Walter Cecil Sell Mt. Pleasant, Pa. 

A._B.,_Mt. Morris (111.) College,_1931 

District of Western Pennsylvania, Church of the Brethren 

John Sampson Thompson ....... Piedmont, Ohio 

A.B., Asbury College, 1939 

B.D., Asbury Theological Seminary, 1942 

North East Ohio Conference, The Methodist Church 

WiLMER Neil Thornburg ....... McDonald, Pa. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1945 
Kansas City Presbytery 



GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Clarence Fillmore Anderson ....... Apollo, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1925 

Th.B., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1928 

KIskimlnetas Presbytery 

WiLLARD Carl Billica ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1931 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1934 

Pittsburgh Presbytery, The Reformed Presbyterian Church 

Charles William Brown ....... Washington, Pa. 

A.B., Geneva College, 1934 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1937 

Chartiers Presbytery 



70 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



Herman Andrew Bruder ....... Washington, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1925 

Th.B., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1928 

Chartiers Presbytery 

Donald Henry Brush Warrendale, Pa. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1918 

Graduate Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1921 

Allegheny Presbytery 

Wayne Herron Christy ...... New Wilmington, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1938 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1943 

Mercer Presbytery 

Hudson Marshall Clements ....... Butler, Pa. 

A.B., Thiel College, 1925 

B.D., The Lutheran Theological Seminary, (Phila., Pa.) 1945 

Pittsburgh Synod, The Evangelical Lutheran Church 

James Hugh Dean ........ Fairpoint, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1941 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1944 

Wheeling Presbytery 

Edward Ralph De Lair ........ Butler, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1942 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1945 

Butler Presbytery 

Paul R. Graham ......... Bellevue, Pa. 

A.B., Geneva College, 1938 

Th.B., Princeton Theological Seminary, 1941 

Allegheny Presbytery 

William James Grossman ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1934 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1939 

Allegheny Presbytery 

William Alexander Hadden ..... West Middletown, Pa. 
A.B., Muskingum College, 1934 
Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1936 
Chartiers Presbytery 

Franklin Willis Harper ...... Greensburg, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1940 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1943 

Westmoreland Presbytery 

Frederick Arland Huston ....... Etna, Pa. 

B.S., Kent State University, 1936 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1941 

Allegheny Presbytery 

Thomas Johnston ........ McKeesport, Pa. 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1942 

S.T.B., Westminster (Md.) Theological Seminary, 1945 

Pittsburgh Conference, The Methodist Church 

George Loren Jones ....... Homer City, Pa. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1943 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1946 

Conemaugh Presbytery 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 71 



Richard Karl Kennedy ...... Vandergrlft, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1941 

Th.B., PIttsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1944 

Kiskiminetas Presbytery 

Hugh Eugene Marsh Clinton, Pa. 

B.S., Monmouth College, 1942 _ 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1945 

Monongahela Presbytery 

Andrew Vance Meanor ....... Freeport, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1934 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1937 

Kiskiminetas Presbytery 

Leland Merrill Miller ...... Emsworth, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1920 

Graduate, Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1923 

Allegheny Presbytery 

Walter Edwin McCrory ...... Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1934 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1937 

Monongahela Presbytery 

Wallace Gilchrist McGeoch ...... Leechburg, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1926 

Th.B., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1929 

Kiskiminetas Presbytery 

Howard Dewalt McMurray ...... Oil City, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1931 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1935 

Lake Presbytery 

Albert Roy Ogborne Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1941 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1944 

Monongahela Presbytery 

David John Rowland, Jr. ...... West View, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1941 

Th.B., Pittsburgb-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1944 

Allegheny Presbytery 

Lawrence Wayne Stitt ....... Trafford, Pa. 

A.B., University of Michigan, 1943 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1945 

Westmoreland Presbytery 

Herbert Walton Voigt ...... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1935 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1938 

Monongahela Presbytery 

Clark Kenneth Weber ....... Elizabeth, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1938 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1941 

Westmoreland Presbytery 

Mack Thaddeus Williams ...... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Roger Williams University, 1918 

B.D., Oberlin Graduate School of Theology, 1928 

National Negro Baptist Convention 



72 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



STUDENTS IN CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 
Juniors 



Charlene Freeman Arthur .... 
B. Sc. in Ed., A/Iuskingum College, 1946 
Muskingum Presbytery 

EvLYN Wehling Fulton .... 
A.B., Pennsylvania College for Women, 1944 
Allegheny Presbytery 

Alice Ruth Gabel ..... 
A.B., University of Illinois, 1945 
Wisconsin Presbytery 

Jean Elda Snodgrass ..... 
B. Sc. in Ed., Muskingum College, 1944 
Beaver Valley Presbytery 

Edith Margaretta Vorhis . . . . 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1946 
Monongahela Presbytery 



Cambridge, Ohio 



Bellevue, Pa. 



West Allis, Wis. 



New Castle, Pa. 



Coraopolis, Pa. 



SUMMARY OF ATTENDANCE 

Undergraduate Department 

Juniors ........ 

Middlers ....... 

Seniors ....... 

Part-time ....... 

Graduate Department ..... 

Department of Christian Education 

Total Enrollment ..... 



17 
16 

9 

9 51 

29 

5 
85 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary. 



73 



INSTITUTIONS REPRESENTED 



Asbury College, Kentucky 

Buena Vista College, Iowa 

Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary, Pennsylvania 

Geneva College, Pennsylvania 

Grove City College, Pennsylvania 

Hope College, Michigan .... 

Kent State University, Ohio 

Knoxville College, Tennessee 

Monmouth College, Illinois 

Mount Morris College, Illinois 

Muskingum College, Ohio 

Ohio State University .... 

Pennsylvania College for Women 

Roger Williams University, Kentucky 

Seattle Pacific College, Washington 

Sterling College, Kansas .... 

Syracuse University, New York 

Tarkio College, Missouri .... 

Taylor University, Indiana 

Thiel College, Pennsylvania 

University of Illinois ..... 

University of Michigan .... 

University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Waynesburg College, Pennsylvania 

West Liberty College, West Virginia 

Westminster College, Pennsylvania 

Westminster Choir College, New Jersey 

Wheaton College, Illinois .... 



*U 



G CE 





1 








1 






la 


1 








1 


2» 






I 


2 






1 


1 






1 








7 


2 






1 








6 


9 


3 




1 


1 


1 




1 








11 


2 






1 








2 








1 


1 

1 


1 




3 


1 
1 






1 








7 


6 






1 








1 







51 



29 



LOCALITIES REPRESENTED 

*U G CE 

Illinois .......... 3 

Iowa .......... 3 

Kansas .......... 2 

Kentucky ......... 1 

Michigan ......... 3 

Missouri .......... 1 

Nebraska ......... 1 

New Jersey ......... 1 

New York 3 

Ohio 7 1 1 

Pennsylvania 24 28 3 

Washington ......... 1 

West Virginia ........ 1 

Wisconsin ......... 1 

51 29 5 

Total 85 

(* U — Undergraduate; G — Graduate; CE — Christian Education) 



74 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary. 



SPECIAL LECTURES, 1947-1948 

In the Pressly Chapel 

The Reverend Henry Hitt Crane, D.D., LL.D. 
"When Calamity Comes" 

The Reverend St. Paul L. Epps 

"The Young People's Special — ABC" 

The Reverend Robert W. Gibson, D.D. 
Holy Week Service 

The Reverend James H. Grier, D.D., LL.D. 
"Problems of the Pastor" 

The Reverend Herbert Lockyer, D.D. 
"Make Full Proof of Thy Ministry" 

The Reverend James Millar, D.D. 

"Russia's Failure to be Touched by the 
Reformation and the Renaissance" 

The Reverend J. Reed Miller 

"The Sabbath Evening Service" 

The Reverend W. W. Orr, D.D. 

"Administering a Church Program" 
(Series of four lectures) 

Mr. William Parsons 

"The Inter-Seminary Movement" 

The Reverend Jacob Prins, D.D. 
"Laborers Together With God" 

The Reverend Howard C. Scharfe, D.D. 
"The Burden of Knowing" 

Mrs. H. Ray Shear 

"The Work of the Women's General Missionary Society" 

In the Western Seminary Chapel 

Bishop Otto Dibelius 

"Religious Conditions on the Continent of Europe" 

At the Webster Memorial Forum 

The Reverend Stillman A. Foster, D.D. 
"The Pulpit Prayer" 

The Reverend Robert H. French, D.D. 
"The Heart of the Minister" 

The Reverend John H. Gerstner, Ph.D. 
"The Educational Work of the Minister 
in the Local Church" 

The Reverend Richard W. Graves, D.D. 
"The Reality of the Ministry" 

The Reverend Ansley C. Moore, D.D. 
"The Church and Social Order" 

The Reverend W. W. Orr, D.D. 

"The Christmas Story" 

The Reverend John Coventry Smith, D.D. 
"The Opportunities in Foreign Missions" 



HISTORICAL ROLL OF PROFESSORS 





Place of 


Inauguration 


John Anderson Service 


John Banks .... 






Philadelphia 


James Ramsey .... 






Canonsburg 


Joseph Kerr .... 






Pittsburgh 


Mungo Dick .... 






Pittsburgh 


John Taylor Pressly 






Allegheny 


David Carson .... 






Canonsburg 


Thomas Beveridge 






Canonsburg 


Moses Kerr 






Allegheny- 


Joseph Claybaugh 






Oxford 


Samuel W. McCracken 






Oxford 


James Martin .... 






Canonsburg 


James Lemonte Dinwiddie 






Allegheny 


Abraham Anderson 






Canonsburg 


Alexander Downs Clark 






Allegheny 


David Reynolds Kerr . 






Allegheny 


Samuel Wilson .... 






Xenia 


William Davidson 






Oxford 


Alexander Young .... 






Oxford 


John Scott ..... 






Monmouth 


Joseph Clokey .... 






Xenia 


Andrew Morrow Black 






Monmouth 


David Alexander Wallace 






Monmouth 


David Alexander Wallace 






Xenia 


Joseph Tate Cooper 






Allegheny 


William Bruce .... 






Xenia 


James Gillespie Carson 






Xenia 


William Gallogly Moorehead 






Xenia 


Jackson Burgess McMichael 






Xenia 


Alexander Young . 






Allegheny 


James Harper 
David MacDill 






Xenia 






Xenia 


David A. McClenahan 






Allegheny 


James Alexander Grier 






Allegheny 


John McNaugher 






Allegheny 


WiLBERT Webster White 






Xenia 


Oliver Joseph Thatcher 






Allegheny 


John A. Wilson . 






Allegheny 


John Douds Irons . 






Xenia 


Joseph Kyle 






Xenia 


Jesse Johnson 






Xenia 


John Elliott Wishart . 






Xenia 


William Riley Wilson . 






Allegheny 


Charles Frederick Wishart 






Allegheny 


John Hunter Webster . 






Xenia 


Melvin Grove Kyle 






Xenia 


James Doig Rankin 






Pittsburgh 


David Frazier McGill . 






Pittsburgh 


James Gallaway Hunt 






Pittsburgh 


James Harper Grier 






Pittsburgh 


Robert McNary Karr . 






St. Louis 


James Leon Kelso 






St. Louis 


George Boone McCreary 






St. Louis 


Robert Nathaniel Montgomery 






Pittsburgh 


Albert Henry Baldinger 






Pittsburgh 


Clarence Joseph Williamson 






Pittsburgh 


George Anderson Long 






Pittsburgh 


Theophilus Mills Taylor . 






Pittsburgh 


Addison Hardie Leitch 






Pittsburgh 


H. Ray Shear 






Pittsburgh 


Florence M. Lewis 






Pittsburgh 



Period of 
Service 
1794-1819 
1820-1826 
1821-1842 
1825-1829 
1829-1831 
1832-1870 
1834-1834 
1835-1871 
1835-1836 
1839-1855 
1839-1840 
1842-1846 
1843-1846 
1847-1855 
1847-1884 
1851-1887 
1855-1875 
1855-1858 
1855-1874 
1858-1874 
1858-1873 
1864-1874 
1867-1870 
1883-1883 
1871-1886 
1871-1880 
1873-1888 
1873-1914 
1873-1878 
1876-1891 
1879-1899 
1884-1902 
1885-1921 
1886-1909 
1886-1943 
1889-1894 
1888-1892 
1893-1915 
1895-1905 
1899-1921 
1903-1930 
1905-1923 
1907-1940 
1907-1914 
1908-1933 
1914-1^0 
1914-1929 
1915-1931 
1920-1926 
1922-1926 
1922- 
1923- 
1924-1946 
1926-1930 
1931-1947 
1932- 
1942- 
1942- 
1946- 
1947- 
1947- 



76 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary. 



DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS 

The provision of modern theological education without charge 
to students requires an extensive outlay on the part of the Semi- 
nary. The maintenance of the Seminary building and equipment 
is but one item in the annual draft upon the treasury. At the 
present time the income from endowment is quite insufficient to 
meet current expenses. 

The claims of the Seminary are, therefore, submitted to the 
consideration of all who wish to honor the Lord with their sub- 
stance. Congregations, as well as individuals, are asked to give 
their help to the institution. Appeal is also made to all who pur- 
pose making bequests to remember the Seminary, for the training 
of the ministry is the primary educational task of the Church. 

All bequests should be drawn as follows: 
For Personal Property 

I hereby give and bequeath to The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theo- 
logical Seminary of the United Presbyterian Church of North 

America, the sum of dollars to 

constitute a part of the permanent funds of the institution. 

For Real Estate 

I hereby give and devise to The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological 
Seminary of the United Presbyterian Church of North America, 
its successors and assigns, forever, all that lot or piece of ground 
^carefully describing the property), the same to hold or dispose 
of for the benefit of the permanent funds of the institution. 

Bequests may also be made for special funds, scholarships, or 
lectures. 

Care should be taken to use the corporate name as given 
above, and to have the bequest conform to the laws of the State 
governing it. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary. 77 



CORRESPONDENCE 

In general, correspondence should be addressed to the Pres- 
ident of the Faculty, the Rev. George A. Long, D.D., 616 West 
North Avenue, Pittsburgh 12, Pa. 

Letters relating to the endowment and funds should be ad- 
dressed to Mr. M. J. Hein, Treasurer, using the Seminary address 
given above. 

All letters concerning registration and admission to the Sem- 
inary should be sent to the Registrar's Office. Likewise, all re- 
quests for transcripts of record should be addressed to the Regis- 
trar in properly written form, — giving the full name of the appli- 
cant, his present address, the place and period of attendance, and 
the name and address of the institution and official to whom the 
transcript is to be sent. The request should be accompanied by 
the usual fee of one dollar (^1.00), unless the transcript is the ap- 
plicant's first, or it is to be used in connection with an application 
for a Chaplaincy in the Armed Forces of the United States. 



78 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary. 



INDEX 

Academic Regulations 19,43,48 

Accreditation of the Seminary ........ 6 

Admission, Terms of ........ . 19,43,48 

Alumni Association 64 

Attendance, Summary of .......... 72 

Awards Granted, 1946-1947 65 

Bible Lands Museum .......... 56 

Board of Advisors, Dept. of Christian Education ..... 9 

Board of Directors ........... 7 

Board of Trustees ........... 9 

Calendar for 1948 and 1949 4 

Calendar of the Seminary .......... 5 

Chapel Preaching ........... 41 

Christian Education, Department of ..... . 47-54 

Classification of Students ......... 20,48 

Control and Management of the Seminary ...... 6 

Correspondence ........... 77 

Courses of Instruction, Undergraduate Department .... 27-42 

Courses Available to Graduate Students ...... 26,43 

Courses of Instruction, Department of Christian Education . . 51-54 

Credentials Required for Admission ...... 19,43,48 

Cultural Advantages of the Seminary ....... 57 

Curriculum in Outline, Undergraduate Department . . . .25 

Curriculum in Outline, Department of Christian Education . . .50 

Degrees Granted, 1946-1947 65 

Degree of Bachelor of Divinity ......... 22 

Degree of Master of Theology 43 

Degree of Master of Religious Education 49 

Denominational Seminary, Advantages of . 57 

Dining Club - ........... 62 

Donations and Bequests 76 

Dormitory, Women's Committee . . . . . . . .9 

Elective Courses 26 

Emeritus Professors 11 

Examinations . . ... 22 

Facilities for Study 55 

Faculty - 10 

Fees and Other Expenses 44, 49, 62-63 

Field Work 41, 48 

Graduate Studies, Department of 43-45 

Graduation, Requirements and Awards 22, 43, 49 

Historical Roll of Professors 75 

Honors, Cum Laude Series 22 

Institutions and Localities Represented 73 

Insurance for Students 60 

Library and Reading Room 55 

Life at the Seminary 59 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary. 79 



Location of the Seminary Building 59 

Musical Opportunity 61 

Obituaries: Dr. McNaugher, and Dr. Wilson 12-15 

Observatory, The Allegheny ......... 58 

Physical Culture , . 62 

Planetarium, The Buhl Foundation ........ 58 

Pre-Seminary Studies . . . .17 

Pre-Theological Major . . . . . . . . . .18 

Prizes Awarded, 1947 66 

Purpose of the Seminary .......... 16 

Register of Students, 1947-1948 66 

Registration 19, 21 

Religious Life at the Seminary ......... 60 

Rooms and Accommodations ........ 59-60 

Schedule, The Norm and Modifications 21 

Scholarships, Competitive .......... 23 

Self-support and Student Aid 63 

Social Life at the Seminary ......... 61 

Special Lectures, 1947^1948 74 

Student Association 64 

Students, Register of, 1947-1948 66 

Summer Institutes 45 

Term and Course, Prescribed by General Assembly ..... 16 
Undergraduate Department ........ 16-42 

University of Pittsburgh, Affiliation with .46 

Webster Memorial Forum . . .61 

Women's Dormitory Committee ......... 9 

Y. M. C. A., Allegheny Branch 62 



THE 

PITTSBURGH-XENIA 

THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Founded 1794 




ANNLML CATALCKil h 
1948-1949 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
1949-1950 



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TK ipoi- 1 ir. 

□□DO 





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THE 
ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

OF THE 

Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Theological Seminary 

OF 

THE UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 
OF NORTH AMERICA 

616 West North Avenue 
PITTSBURGH 12, PA. 

1948-1949 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

FOR THE YEAR 

1949-1950 



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m^mmmmmmmmmmmmmm?mmmmmmmmmmmwm 



THE SEMINARY CALENDAR 

1949 

25 May-31 Aug. Summer Session in Practical Theology for stu- 
dents previously qualified in this Seminary. 



Fall Term 

13 Sept. Registration of new students, 9:00 A.M.-5:00 P.M. 

14 Sept. Registration of all regular Middlers and Seniors 

9:00 A.M.— 1:00 P.M. 

14 Sept. Formal Opening of the Session 

Opening Address in Pressly Chapel, 2:00 P.M. 
Reception to new students, 3:00 P.M. 

15 Sept. Class work begins, 8:30 A.M. 

23 Sept. Seminary Communion Service, 7:00 P.M. 

Sacramental Address by the 

Rev. Thomas H. Newcomb, D.D. 

24 Nov. Thanksgiving Day 

30 Nov. Last Day of the Fall Term 



Winter Term 
1 Dec. Class work begins, 8:30 A.M. 
17 Dec. Christmas Vacation begins, after regular class hours 

1950 

3 Jan. Class work resumes, 8:30 A.M. 

8 Feb. Day of Prayer for Colleges and Seminaries 

Address by Professor John Orr, Ph.D. 
1 Mar. Last Day of the Winter term 



Spring Term 
2 Mar. Class Work begins, 8:30 A.M. 
6 Apr. Easter Recess begins, after regular class hours 
11 Apr. Class work resumes, 8:30 A.M. 
14 May Senior Communion Service, 4:00 P.M. 
The Pressly Chapel 
Professor C. J. Williamson officiating 
14 May Baccalaureate Service, 8:00 P.M. 
The Ben Avon U. P. Church 
Sermon by Professor Gordon E. Jackson 
17 May Annual Meeting of the Board of Directors, 2:00 P.M. 

17 May Senior Reception, — the Board of Directors, 7:00 P.M. 

18 May Annual Meeting of the Alumni Association, 4:00 P.M. 

The First Church, North Side, Pittsburgh 
18 May Alumni Dinner, 5:30 P.M. 
18 May Graduating Exercises, 8:00 P.M. 

The First Church, North Side, Pittsburgh 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



THE CONTROL AND MANAGEMENT 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary is the result of a 
union of the Pittsburgh and Xenia Seminaries consummated in 
1930. According to its proper ancestry the Xenia Seminary was 
founded in 1794 by the Associate Presbyterian Church. The 
Pittsburgh Seminary was founded in 1825 under the auspices of 
the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church. The Seminary as 
now established is under the immediate control of the American 
Synods of the United Presbyterian Church and the ultimate review 
control of the General Assembly. Its management is committed to 
a Board of Directors and Trustees. The Board of Directors consists 
of thirty-five members, ministers or ruling elders, who are nom- 
inated by the several Synods to the General Assembly for elec- 
tion on the basis of each Synod having one representative for 
every five thousand church members or a major fraction thereof. 
Each Synod has at least one representative. The Board of 
Directors has the general government of the Seminary, subject 
to the authority of the Synods and the General Assembly, appoints 
the Trustees, and provides for the financial maintenance of the 
institution. The Board of Trustees consists of twelve members. 
It is the corporate body which holds and manages the real estate 
and the funds of the Seminary. The term and the course of 
study are determined by the General Assembly. 



ACCREDITATION OF THE SEMINARY 

The Seminary is an accredited member of the American 
Association of Theological Schools, and has had this standing 
from the time of the adoption of the Association's accrediting 
system in 1938. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



Synod of New York 



The Rev. J. Kenneth Miller, M.A., D.D. 
The Rev. Roy E. Grace, Th.M., D.D. . 
The Rev. James M. Guthrie, D.D. 
The Rev. J. M. Findley Brown, D.D. 
The Rev. Lee E. Walker, D.D. 



Term 

Expires 

Garden City, N. Y. 1949 

. Upper Darby, Pa. 1950 

Floral Park, L. I., N. Y. 1950 

. Walton, N. Y. 1951 

Philadelphia, Pa. 1951 



Synod of Pittsburgh 

Mr. Frank H. Davis Pittsburgh, Pa. 

The Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, Th.M., D.D. . . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

The Rev. Paul M. Gillis, Th.M., Ph.D. . . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

The Rev. H. H. McConnell, Th.M., D.D. . . New York, N. Y. 

The Rev. James T. Vorhis, Th.M., D.D. . . . Coraopolis, Pa. 

G. AsHTON Brownlee, Esq. ..... Washington, Pa. 

Mr. C. a. Colgate ...... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

The Rev. R. W. Gibson, D.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

First Synod of the West 

Mr. Frank L. Burton. ...... New Castle, Pa. 

The Rev. J. M. Ferguson, D.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

The Rev. Don P. Montgomery, D.D. . . . Youngstown, Ohio 
The Rev. Walker S. Brownlee .... Hamburg, N. Y. 

The Rev. W. Scott McMunn, D.D Butler, Pa. 

The Rev. Howard D. McMurray Oil City, Pa. 

Mr. Albert B. McClester ..... Butler, Pa. 
The Rev. Robert P. MacDonald . . . New Wilmington, Pa. 
The Rev. Wm. F. Rotzler, D.D. . . . Pittsburgh, Pa. 



1949 
1949 
1950 
1950 
1950 
1951 
1951 
1951 



1949 
1949 
1949 
1950 
1950 
1950 
1951 
1951 
1951 



Synod of Ohio 

The Rev. Frank J. Irvine 

The Rev. J. L. McCreight, Ph.D., D.D. 

The Rev. Alfred Martin, Th.M. 



Dearborn, Mich. 1949 

New Concord, Ohio 1950 

East Liverpool, Ohio 1951 



Second Synod 

The Rev. Daniel C. Campbell, D.D. 
The Rev. Ernest B. McClellan, D.D, 



Monroe, Ohio 1951 
Columbus, Ohio 1951 



Synod of Tllinois 






The Rev. J. P. Lytle, D.D. 


. West Allis, Wis. 


1951 


The Rev. J. E. Simpson, D.D. 


Oak Park, 111. 


1951 



8 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 

Synod of Iowa Jj^^^^ 

The Rev. J. Dallas Gibson, Jr. ... . Garner, Iowa 1949 

The Rev. Paul W. Chapin St. Joseph, Mo. 1951 

Synod of the Plains 

The Rev. James L. Cottrell ..... Tulsa, Okla. 1951 

Synod of Nebraska 

The Rev. Roy P. Morris Murray, Nebr. 1951 

Synod of California 

The Rev. Carl S. Dunn, D.D. . . . Los Angeles, Calif. 1951 

Synod of the Columbia 

The Rev. J. Boyd Patterson, D.D. .... Portland, Ore. 1950 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

The Rev. John E. Simpson, D.D., President 
The Rev. Walker S. Brownlee, Vice President 
The Rev. James T. Vorhis, Th.M., D.D., Secretary 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

The Executive Committee 

The Rev. W. F. Rotzler, D.D., Chairman 

The Rev. James T. Vorhis, Th.M., D.D., Secretary 

The Rev. R. W. Gibson, D.D. 

Mr. Frank H. Davis 

Mr. Albert B. McClester 

The Rev. Don P. Montgomery, D.D. 

The Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, Th.M., D.D. 

The Committee on Beneficiary Funds 

The Seminary Faculty 



HONORARY DIRECTORS 

The Rev. J. Walter Liggitt, D.D. 

The Rev. W. E. McCulloch, D.D. 

The Rev. T. N. McQuoid, D.D. 

The Rev. W. L. C. Samson, D.D. 

The Rev. J. A. Thompson, D.D., LL.D., L.H.D. 

The Rev. S. C. Gamble, D.D. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES T,rm 

Expires 

Mr. Frank H. Davis Pittsburgh, Pa. 1949 

*The Rev. Charles W. Fulton, D.D. . . . Pittsburgh, Pa. 1949 

Mr. E. Bruce Hill Pittsburgh, Pa. 1949 

The Rev. James T. Vorhis, Th.M., D.D. . . CoraopoHs, Pa. 1949 

Robert Fisher, Esq. ....... Indiana, Pa. 19S0 

Mr. T. J. Gillespie, Jr Pittsburgh, Pa. 1950 

J. M. Lashly, Esq., LL.D St. Louis, Mo. 1950 

The Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, Th.M., D.D. . Pittsburgh, Pa. 1950 

The Rev. E. A. Daum, D.D Valencia, Pa. 1951 

Mr. John O. Gilmore Pittsburgh, Pa. 1951 

The Hon. VV. H. McNaugher .... Pittsburgh, Pa. 1951 

George M. Swan, Esq Pittsburgh, Pa. 1951 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

The Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, Th.M., D.D., President 
George M. Swan, Esq., Vice President 
Mr. M. J. Hein, Secretary and Treasurer 

STANDING COMMITTEES 
The Committee on Finance The Committee on Seminary Premises 

The Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D., Mr. Frank H. Davis, 

Chairman Chairman 

Mr. Frank H. Davis *The Rev. Charles W. Fulton, D.D. 

Mr. T. J. Gillespie, Jr. 

The Purchasing Committee 

The Rev. George A. Long, D.D. 



DORMITORY COMMITTEE 
Miss Eleanor Gillespie Mrs. W. H. Ochiltree 

Miss Alice Gray Mrs. Chalmers T. Siviter 

Mrs. J. L. Kelso Mrs. A. H. Trimble 



THE BOARD OF ADVISORS 

OF THE 

DEPARTMENT OF CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

The Rev. Wm. F. Rotzler, D.D., Chairman 

The Rev. James T. Vorhis, Th.M., D.D., Secretary 

The Rev. Robert W. Gibson, D.D. 

Mr. Frank H. Davis 

Mr. Albert B. McClester 

The Rev. Don P. Montgomery, D.D. 

The Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, Th.M., D.D. 

Mrs. H. Ray Shear 

Mrs. Thomas R. Sarver 

Miss Edith L. McBane 

The Rev. A. K. Stewart, D.D. 

The Rev. Glenn P. Reed, D.D. 

The Rev. Charles L. Hussey, D.D. 

The Rev. Albert E. Kelly, D.D. 

Changed ecclesiastical relations 



10 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



THE FACULTY 



The Rev. George Anderson Long, D.D., President 
Professor of English Bible 

The Rev. Robert McNary Karr, D.D., Registrar 
Professor of Systematic and Biblical Theology 

The Rev. James Leon Kelso, Th.D., D.D. 

Professor of Semitics and Biblical Archaeology 

The Rev. Clarence Joseph Williamson, D.D., Secretary 
Professor of Church History and Government 

The Rev. Theophilus Mills Taylor, D.D. 

Professor, the John McNaugher Chair 

of New Testament Literature and Exegesis 

The Rev. Addison Hardie Leitch, Ph.D., D.D. 

Professor elect, Systematic and Biblical Theology 

Miss Florence M. Lewis, M.A., Dean of Women 
Associate Professor of Christian Education 

The Rev. H. Ray Shear, M.A., D.D. 
Professor of Practical Theology 

The Rev. Gordon Edmund Jackson, Th.M. 

Professor elect, Philosophy of Religion and Religious Education 

Professor Donald L. Barbe, M.A. 
Instructor in Public Speaking 

The Rev. Paul R. Graham 

Instructor in New Testament Greek 



EMERITUS PROFESSORS 

The Rev. Jesse Johnson, D.D., LL.D. 
Emeritus Professor of Church History 
Reynoldsburg, Ohio 

The Rev. George Boone McCreary, Ph.D., D.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Philosophy of Religion and Religious Education 
777 Berkeley Place, Claremont, Calif. 

The Rev. Albert Henry Baldinger, D.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Practical Theology 

41 Penshurst Road, Ben Avon Heights, Pittsburgh 2, Pa. 

The Rev. James Doig Rankin, D.D., LL.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Systematic and Biblical Theology 
715 South El Molino Avenue, Pasadena, Calif. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 11 



OFFICERS OF THE FACULTY 

The Rev. George Anderson Long, D.D. 
President 

The Rev. Robert McNary Karr, D.D. 
Registrar 

The Rev. Clarence Joseph Williamson, D.D. 
Secretary 

Miss Florence M. Lewis, M.A. 
Dean of Women 



COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

The Credentials Committee 

Dr. Karr Dr. Leitch Prof. Jackson 

The Curriculum Committee 

The Faculty 

The Library Committee 

Dr. Taylor Dr. Kelso Prof. Jackson 

The Devotional Committee 

Dr. Williamson Dr. Shear 

The Committee on Field Work and Placement 

Dr. Shear Miss Lewis 

The Press Committee 

Dr. Kelso Dr. Williamson 

The Catalogue Committee 

Dr. Karr Dr. Taylor 

Dr. Leitch Miss Lewis 

Graduate Studies Committee 

Dr. Taylor Dr. Leitch Dr. Kelso 



Miss Mildred E. Cowan 

Secretary to the President 

Miss Evlyn Wehling Fulton, A.B., B.S. 

Registrar elect, and Secretary to the Faculty 

Mrs. Harold E. Kurtz 
Acting Librarian 



12 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



THE PURPOSE OF THE SEMINARY 



I 



The purpose of the Seminary, as defined in the Constitution, 
is to instruct candidates for the gospel ministry, ordained ministers 
of the gospel, and such as may be preparing for other special lines 
of Christian service, in the knowledge of the doctrines of the 
Scriptures and the order and institutes of worship taught therein 
and summarily exhibited in the standards of the United Presbyte- 
rian Church of North America; to cherish in them the life of 
true godliness, and to cultivate the gifts which Christ, the Head 
of the Church, confers on those whom He calls and ordains to the 
ministry, to the end that there may be raised up a succession of 
able, faithful, and godly ministers of the gospel and of other 
Christian workers. 



THE UNDERGRADUATE DEPARTMENT 



THE TERM AND COURSE OF STUDY 



The regular course of ministerial training prescribed by the 
General Assembly covers a period of three academic years, each of 
which is divided into three terms. The annual session begins the 
second Wednesday of September, and continues thirty-five weeks 
including holidays. 

The Seminary course is built for college graduates, and 
presupposes a foundation of broad and liberal culture. In 
preparation for their professional training in the Seminary, college 
students should take substantial courses in the subjects indicated 
in the following recommended Pre-Seminary Studies. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 13 



PRE-SEMINARY STUDIES 

The American Association of Theological Schools, at its 
twelfth biennial meeting, Lexington, Ky., June, 1940, adopted a 
Statement regarding Pre-Seminary Studies and authorized it to be 
sent to all colleges and universities in the United States and 
Canada. In its present form, the statement includes the follow- 
ing specifications as to the proper fields of study and the minimum 
number of semester hours: 

Semester 
Fields Hours 

English (Literature, Composition and Speech) „ 12'16 

Philosophy (At least two of the following: Introduction to philosophy. 
History of philosophy. Ethics, Logic) _ _ 6' 12 

History „ „ 642 

Psychology 2-3 

A foreign language (At least one of the following: Latin, Greek, 
Hebrew, French, German) -_ ™..-.«_„12'16 

Natural sciences (Physical or biological) 4'6 

Social sciences (At least two of the following: Economics, Sociology, 
Government or political science. Social psychology. Education) ~. 4'6 

Concentration of work or 'majoring', is a common practice in colleges. For 
such concentration or major, a constructive sequence based upon any one, 
two, or three of the above fields of study would lead up naturally to a 
theological course. 

With the addition of a substantial course in Speech, and of 
12-16 semester hours in Elementary Greek, the emphasis being laid 
upon vocabulary, grammar and syntax, the Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Seminary has endorsed the foregoing Statement of Pre-Seminary 
Studies, and urges all college students who are looking forward 
to the Gospel ministry to make use of this Statement in tne 
shaping of their college course (in consultation with their advisors 
at college), so that they may not only secure the desired college 
degree but at the same time secure the best possible preparation 
for seminary work. 

The Statement of Pre-Seminary Studies does not purport to 
be in itself a complete four-year college course, but rather calls 
attention to those fields and courses of study which are accessible 
to all college students and which are of basic importance in 
preparation for seminary training. 



14 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 

The Statement is not yet mandatory, but it indicates the 
trend in seminary circles. The Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary will 
use this Pre-Seminary Statement of Studies as a standard by 
which to judge the preparedness of applicants for admission. 

Those who have notable deficiencies, especially in Philosophy 
and Greek, will be required to remove them. All new registrants 
will be required to take a placement examination in New Testa- 
ment Greek, regardless of the amount of collegiate Greek credits 
presented for entrance. This placement examination is based 
upon the vocabulary of the Johannine literature and the grammar 
covered in Machen's New Testament Greek for Beginners. Those 
failing to pass the examination with a minimum grade of 75 will 
be placed in appropriate classes in Elementary Greek which are 
offered for the convenience of those who are partially or totally 
deficient in Greek. Adequate preparation is prerequisite to New 
Testament Exegesis. 

PRE-THEOLOGICAL MAJOR 

Students in Colleges of Agriculture, who have it in mind to 
prepare for ministering to rural churches, may not find it entirely 
practicable to follow the Pre-Seminary Studies outlined above. 
In such case, and with a view to the most effective rural ministry, 
we recommend that in their college days they follow the Pre- 
Theological Major suggested by the Conference on Relation- 
ships between Colleges of Agriculture and Theological Seminaries, 
held at Purdue University, Nov. 6, 1940. The suggested Pre- 
Theologlcal Major is as follows: 

"At least one basic course (three semester hours) in each of the following 
fields: 

Agricultural Economics 

Economics 

English Composition, 2 courses (6 semester hours) 

English Literature (preferably 2 courses) 

History or Government (preferably 2 courses) 

Philosophy 

Public Speaking 

Psychology 

Rural Sociology 

Sociology 

"In addition the student would fulfill the minimum requirements of the 
College of Agriculture, which include Science (usually Biology and Chemistry). 

"Recommended Electives: 
Education 
Foreign Language 

"Undergraduate courses in religion are not required in the suggested major, 
as these cannot be offered in state-supported institutions." 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 15 



ADMISSION 

Registration for the Fall Term. Tuesday, September 13, 1949, 
is set aside for the registration of all new students. Wednesday 
morning is reserved for the registration of all regular students 
in the Middle and Senior classes. Students having any irregulari- 
ties in their standing or schedule should in every case arrange 
to be seen by special appointment. It is important that students 
come for registration at the times designated. In case of late 
registration, a fee of one dollar a day is required, up to a maximum 
of five dollars, and the period during which late registration is 
permitted is limited to ten days from the beginning of each quarter. 

Admission. The normal time to enter the Seminary is at the 
opening of the annual session in September. The regular program 
of training begins at this time, and exhibits the maximum values 
when taken in proper educational sequence. Application for ad- 
mission should be made well in advance, on the official form, 
which may be secured from the Registrar's office; and should be 
followed promptly by the credentials mentioned below. 

Credentials. Every applicant for admission to the Seminary 
must present satisfactory credentials of his suitableness as a can- 
didate for the ministry or other contemplated form of Christian 
service. These credentials include: 1) A Letter of Introduction 
from his Pastor or Session testifying to his Christian character, 
active church membership, and general fitness for the ministry; 

2) A Letter from the Clerk of his Presbytery, or corresponding 
church officer, indicating his official acceptance as a candidate 
for the ministry and his recommendation as a student of theology; 

3) A complete official Transcript of his Academic Credits, begin- 
ning with his high school record unless the applicant has com- 
pleted two or more years of college work; (the degree of A.B., or 
an equivalent degree, from an accredited college or university is 
required for admission) ; 4) Satisfactory Testimonials from at 
least three personal references, as indicated on the application 
blank. 

Declaration of Purpose. Before being admitted to the privi- 
leges of the Seminary, every student shall, in the presence of the 
Registrar, subscribe a declaration to the effect that while he is a 
student in the Seminary he will regularly, punctually, and diligently 



16 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



attend upon all the instructions of the professors, that he will 
promptly comply with the lawful requisitions of the Faculty and 
be subject to their authority, that he will honestly conform to all 
regulations of the Seminary, and that he will not propagate any 
opinions in opposition to the standards of the United Presbyterian 
Church. 

Entrance Deposit. From the moment of entrance, students are 
regarded as stewards of the Church's property, having special 
responsibility in connection with the free use of library and dormi- 
tory equipment. Each student, upon matriculation, is required to 
make a deposit of $5.00, which is returnable at the end of the 
Seminary course, less the insurance premium and any other nec- 
essary deductions. (See page 56.) 

A Matriculation Fee of $5.00 is required of each new student. 

CLASSIFICATION 

Regular Degree Students. Applicants for admission as 
students in full standing to take the prescribed course in prepara- 
tion for the Degree of B.D. must have a bachelor's degree from a 
standard college or university, the degree having been secured 
without duplication of credit. 

Part-Time Students. Students who are not so situated that 
they can devote full time to Seminary work may be admitted by 
the Faculty to take such courses as their time permits In prepara- 
tion for some form of Christian service. But they must have the 
same academic preparation, and furnish the same credentials, as 
are required of Regular Degree Students. 

Classification by Years. Students who register for the full 
course are, for practical purposes, classified normally as Juniors 
during their first academic year, as Middlers during their second 
year, and as Seniors during their third year. 

Transferred Students. Persons qualified for admission to the 
Seminary, who have successfully completed partial courses In some 
other school of theology accredited by the American Association 
of Theological Schools, may be admitted by the Faculty to corres- 
ponding standing In this Institution upon the presentation of 
satisfactory credentials, which should Include (1) a certificate of 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 17 



good standing and honorable dismission, and (2) a complete 
official transcript of credits. Students transferring from non- 
accredited seminaries will be admitted only on probation. 

THE STUDENT'S SCHEDULE 

The Norm. Students adequately prepared, and able to give 
full time to Seminary work, are expected to follow the regular 
schedule, involving 16 credit hours a term throughout the entire 
Seminary course. 

Extra-curricular Work. No student shall take academic work 
in excess of the norm, without special permission from the Faculty. 
A record of scholarly work is pre-requisite to the granting of such 
permission. Moreover, without special permission from the Fac- 
ulty, which will not be granted unless the case be strictly excep- 
tional, no student shall assume responsibility for a congregation 
as pastor or as stated supply. 

Limitations. Students having outside work of any kind in- 
volving heavy demands upon their time will be limited to such 
courses as they can carry satisfactorily. And those who, for any 
reason, fail to do a satisfactory grade of work in their scheduled 
studies will also be subject to limitation by the Faculty. 

The Minimum. Students must carry at least 12 hours of con- 
current Seminary work in order to be entitled to the privileges of 
the dormitory. 

Registration each Quarter. At the beginning of each quarter 
every student shall file with the Registrar a complete list of his 
studies, together with a memorandum of all his outside work, 
actual and proposed. When his schedule of studies has been ap- 
proved, no change may be made by the student without consulting 
the Registrar. 

ATTENDANCE 
Regular and prompt attendance is indispensable to satisfac- 
tory work. All absence, or even tardiness, for whatever reason, 
has an injurious effect on the student's standing and progress. 
Absence immediately preceding or immediately following any 
holiday period is charged double against the student's record. 
Excuses for absence must be presented in writing, to the profess- 
ors concerned, immediately upon return to class work; and shall 
specify date, classes missed, and cause of absence. 



18 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



EXAMINATIONS 

In order to test the student's progress in the various depart- 
ments, written examinations are held at the close of each quarter. 
From these examinations and the classroom work, the term grades 
of the student are determined. Seventy per cent, is required as a 
passing grade in every subject. A report of the student's attend- 
ance and credits is made to his presbytery, or corresponding 
church body, at the close of each quarter. 

GRADUATION: REQUIREMENTS AND AWARDS 

General Requirements. In order to graduate, a student must 
successfully complete the regular three-year course of prescribed 

and elective studies amounting to 144 quarter credit hours, together 
with six units of field work. At least one year of work in residence 
is required for graduation. 

The Degree of B.D. The Diploma of the Seminary with the 
Degree of Bachelor of Divinity is conferred only upon Degree 
Students who complete the regular course in a manner satisfactory 
to the Faculty and who maintain more than average ability in 
every department. 

Graduation Fee. A fee of $5.00 is charged to cover the cost 
of Diploma. This fee is due the 15th of the month preceding 
graduation. 

Graduation Honors. The honor. Cum Laude, is granted to all 
who throughout the Seminary course are clearly distinguished 
(1) for academic attainments, (2) for regular and punctual at- 
tendance, and (3) for general fitness for the gospel ministry. 
The honor. Magna Cum Laude, is granted to all who possess these 
qualifications in an unusual degree; and, Summa Cum Laude, in 
very rare instance, in recognition of superlative merit. 






HtVPAUt fi SHAHAM 



T.M. TAYLOR 0.6. 



A,H.LEITCM %.Xi.M&. 




GEO. A. LONG D.O. 
PRE»tl>ENT 





I nCi 

FACULTY 




R.M.KAftR RB. 





H.RAY 5HEAR B.D.M.A. 6(»1>0M jACKIOM TH.M, 



J.t.K6W0 J)lI>,TH.J>. 




C.>.WIILIAMS0M P.P. FLOREHCE M.UWIS H.*. 




».A.&ARBE M,A. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 19 



SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS 



The following competitive scholarships have been provided 
for the benefit of United Presbyterian students for the ministry. 
In order to compete, contestants must carry not less than the reg- 
ular quota of studies; they must complete each term's work satis- 
factorily, without any conditions or failures; and they must fur- 
thermore meet the particular requirements of the desired scholar- 
ship or prize as hereinafter specified. Under each scholarship an 
award is made once each year, at which time the Faculty considers 
all regular degree students who, during the preceding twelve 
months, have completed the necessary amount of work in a 
satisfactory manner. 

The James Purdy Scholarship 

There exists in the possession of the Seminary the Purdy Fund, 
bearing the name of its founder. The income, not to exceed $300, 
is apportioned equally each year to the six members of the Junior 
Class who attain the highest average of excellence in their Seminary 
work. The scholarship is subject to the conditions that no award 
be made to a student whose general average is not above 85% 
or who receives a grade of less than 80% in any department, and 
that the entire Seminary course be finished at this Seminary. 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship 

In memory of the late Thomas Jamison, Esq., of the North 
Side, Pittsburgh, for many years a member of the Board oi 
Trustees of the Seminary, Mrs. Jamison endowed a scholarship, 
the income of which, not to exceed $800, is given each year to the 
member of the Senior Class who attains the highest average of 
excellence in qualifications for the Christian ministry during the 
Junior and Middle years and the first term of the Senior year. 
In the matter of grades, his general average must reach 90%, 
and in no study must the grade be lower than 80%. The winner 
of this award must present to the Faculty within a reasonable 
time a thesis of not less than 10,000 words on a subject selected 
or approved by the Faculty. 

While this award is made without further conditions attached, 
It is the hope of the Faculty that each Jamison scholar will ap- 



20 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



predate the importance of maintaining the Seminary's ideals and 
traditions of scholarship, and that he will use the award promptly 
in connection with a full session of graduate study in some insti- 
tution selected or approved by the Faculty. In this connection, he 
will be expected to make regular reports of the work he is doing 
and submit transcript of grades received. This scholarship offers 
substantial assistance to a worthy man each year in broadening 
his theological education and obtaining the rich culture which comes 
with advanced study at the graduate level. 

The Jane Hogg Gardner Scholarship 

To the Senior student ranking second in qualifications for 
the ministry through the entire course, the Seminary awards the 
income of the Gardner bequest, not to exceed $200, but on condi- 
tion that there is no grade of less than 80% in any department, 
and that a satisfactory thesis of at least 5,000 words on an assigned 
subject be presented to the Faculty within a year from graduation. 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Foundation 

By bequest, in memory of her husband, the late Mrs. Hen- 
rietta M. Lee, of Oakmont Pa., established the "Robert A. 
Lee Church History Foundation," the annual income of which is 
to be given to the Senior student who ranks first in the entire 
course in Church History. Candidates for this award must attend 
this Seminary from the beginning of their Junior year and re- 
ceive no grade less than 80% in any department. 



J 



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The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



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The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



ELECTIVE COURSES 

The following Elective Courses are available to qualified undergraduates 
(ordinarily Middlers and Seniors), and also to students in the Graduate Department, 
who may apply them toward their degree in the fields indicated. (See page 39.) 



Course 



Quarter 
Hours 



Fields 



1 



3 



4 



113. Inter'Testament History 


3 




X 






ISO. 0. T. Canon and Text (given with No. 250) 


l!/2 


X 


X 






151, 152. Hebrew Exegesis . . (each) 


3 


X 








153. Hebrew Critical Paper .... 


3 


X 








155. Geography of Bible Lands 


3 


X 




X 


X 


157. Archaeology of Palestine .... 


3 


X 








158. Seminar in Archaeology .... 


3 


X 








160. Current Trends in 0. T. Criticism 


3 


X 








250. N. T. Canon and Textual Criticism 


m 


X 


X 






253. Greek Critical Paper 


3 


X 








254. Readings in the Koine Papyri 


3 


X 








255. Exegetical Seminar .... 


3 


X 








260. The_ Church and Its Art ._ . _ . 


3 


X 


X 


X 


X 


261. Critical Introd. to the Pauline Epistles 


3 


X 








262. Recent Developments in Synoptic Criticism 


3 


X 








263. Critical Introd. to the Johannine Writings 


3 


X 








264. History of the Christian Liturgy 


3 


X 


X 




X 


265. Research in New Testament 


3 


X 








350. The Parables of Jesus .... 


3 


X 


X 




X 


3 52. The Gospel According to John 


3 


X 


X 




X 


353. The Epistles to the Hebrews 


3 


X 






X 


354. Isaiah I 


3 


X 






X 


355. Isaiah II 


3 


X 






X 


356. Jeremiah ....... 


3 


X 






X 


357. Ezekiel and Daniel ..... 


3 


X 






X 


450. Comparative Religion .... 


3 




X 


X 


X 


451. The Early American Church 


1 




X 






453. American Church Biography 


3 




X 






454. History of Doctrine 


3 




X 


X 


X 


455. Bible Characters ..... 


3 


X 


X 




X 


550. Doctrinal Thesis ..... 


3 




X 






551. Ref. Theologians: Martin Luther 


3 




X 


X 




552. Ref. Theologians: John Calvin 


3 




X 


X 




553. Ref. Theologians: John Knox 


3 




X 


X 




556. Modern Theology & Theologians 


3 




X 


X 


X 


650. Theory & Pract. of Devo. Life 


3 






X 


X 


651. Psychology of Religion .... 


3 




X 


X 


X 


652. Organization and Admin, in Educa. Programs 


3 






X 


X 


653. Methods of Religious Teaching 


3 






X 


X 


654. Hist, of the Philos. of Relig. 


3 




X 


X 


X 


655. Problems in Modern Christian Thought 


3 




X 


X 


X 


656. Christian Ethics . . . . . 


3 




X 


X 


X 


750. Seminar in Sermon Composition 


3 








X 


751. Preaching from the Old Testament 


3 








X 


752. Preaching in the First Five Centuries 


3 




X 


X 


X 


756. Rural Church Leadership 


3 






X 


X 


757. Personal Evangelism 


3 






X 


X 


851. 852. Radio Speaking . . (each) 


1 






X 


X 


854. Material for Public Speaking 


3 






X 


X 



Total 



72 



61 



59 



83 



i 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 23 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



SEMITICS AND BIBLICAL ARCHAEOLOGY 
Dr. Kelso 

The aim of this department is to give the student an appreciation and 
an understanding of the Old Testament. To that end courses are offered (1) 
in the Hebrew language and its peculiar thought techniques, (2) in the Arch' 
aeology of the ancient Near East, (3) in the detailed History of the Hebrew 
people, and (4) in the Old Testament Theology as contrasted with the hea' 
then religions of those days. Seminar courses studying the latest books 
and magazine articles teach the student how he can evaluate and use new 
materials when he gets into the pastorate. An excellent Bible Lands Museum 
serves as a class room in this department. 

Ill, 112. Old Testament History. A study of the political and religious 
history of the Hebrew people from the days of Abraham to the close of the 
Old Testament, with special emphasis on the more significant personalities, 
events and institutions. The results of archaeological research are studied 
in conjunction with the Biblical record. 

Juniors, fall and winter, 3 quarter hours credit each term. 

113. Inter-Testament History. A resume of the Persian and Greek 
periods in Palestine, and a detailed study of the Maccabaean and Roman 
periods, so as to give the student a broad background for the New Testament 
study. The Apocrypha is studied in detail. 

Elective, Juniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

124. Hebrew Language. A practical course in the Hebrew language 
designed to achieve the following objective: to familiarize the student with a 
working vocabulary of the language and the essential features of its gram- 
mar. A text with lectures and written exercises. 

Middlers, fall term, 6 recitations a week, 4 quarter hours credit. 

125, 126. Hebrew Reading. A course in the accurate translation and inter' 
pretation of Biblical Hebrew designed to show the wealth of sermonic ma' 
terial in the original Hebrew. Selected Psalms and historical passages. 

Ivliddlers, winter and spring, 3 quarter hours credit each term. 

131. Old Testament Theology. A detailed study of the major doctrines 
of the Old Testament, with a quick survey of the historical progress of 
Revelation in the light of contemporary civilizations and religions. 

Seniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

150. Old Testament Canon and Text. History of the formation of the 
Hebrew Canon, with emphasis upon the rejection of the Apocrypha. A 
brief history of the Hebrew text and the major versions. 

Elective, V/z quarter hours credit. (Given with No. 250). 



24 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



151, 152. Hebrew Exegesis. Practice in acquiring the principles of Old 
Testament exegesis, not only from the linguistic field, but also from the 
archaeological source material. The more difficult Hebrew passages with 
rich sermonic possibilities are used. 

Elective, Seniors, 3 quarter hours credit for each course. 

153. Hebrew Critical. In order to enable the students to meet the 
requirements of their respective presbyteries in connection with ordination, 
provision is made for each Senior to present a critical paper on the Hebrew 
text of an assigned passage from the Old Testament. There will be individ' 
ual conferences by appointment for reports of progress, during the first 
week of each month of the term. Papers will be due on the last day pre 
ceding examinations. 

Elective, Seniors, fall or winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

155. Geography of Bible Lands. A survey course covering the major 
features of all ancient geography which influenced Biblical history, and a 
detailed study of Palestinian geography and its relation to Old Testament 
history and the customs and manners of its peoples. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

157. Archaeology of Palestine. A rapid historical survey of archaeological 
work in Bible lands, with particular attention to the cultural and religious 
Hfe of the Israelite and non'IsraeUte populations in Palestine. Methods of 
archaeological research and the interpretation of findings are studied, not 
only for apologetic purposes, but especially for the exegetical study of the 
Scriptures. Assigned readings, slides and materials from the Bible lands 
museum. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

158. Seminar in Archaeology. The period of the Exodus and Conquest. 
A research course in which the student becomes acquainted not only with all 
available historical and archaeological source materials, but also with the 
proper methods of presenting his conclusions in such a fashion that they 
will be helpful to the average church member. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

160. Current Trends in Old Testament Criticism. A course designed to 
train students in the evaluation of new books and technical magazine articles 
in all fields of Old Testament research. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 25 

NEW TESTAMENT LITERATURE AND EXEGESIS 
Dr. Taylor Mr. Graham 

The work in this department is centered in the history, literature and 
interpretation of our Primary Source, the New Testament. The aim through' 
out is to impress upon the student the uniqueness of Christianity and its 
Textbook; and to make the study of the New Testament both inspirational 
and practical, looking toward the future pastoral and homiletical work of 
the student. Each student is expected to read, at one sitting, each of the 
New Testament books in its entirety during the period when it is under class' 
room consideration. These readings will follow the text of the Revised 
Standard Version. Repeated readings are advised. The student may use the 
Greek text of Tischendorf (VIII Edition), Westcott and Hort, or Nestle (I6t!h 
Edition, 1936) in the exegetical and critical work. (Except as otherwise 
indicated, courses are given by the professor in charge). 

211. Elementary Greek. New students who are not properly qualified for 
work in New Testament Exegesis are required to study the elements of the 
Greek language. A suitable text is used, and special attention is given to 
vocabulary, verbal forms and syntax. 

Juniors (J^), fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. Mr. Graham 

212. Elementary Greek. Grammar and syntax continued. 

Juniors (J^), winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. Mr. Graham 

213. Elementary Greek. Portions of the Gospel according to John and 
of the Catholic Epistles are read critically in the Greek. 

Juniors (J^), spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. Mr. Graham 

214. Greek Reading. Readings in the New Testament, with grammar re 
view and drill. This course is designed for those students who have had some 
Greek but who need additional study and practice in order to gain that prO' 
ficiency in language which is demanded by the exegetical courses. 

Juniors (J'), fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. Mr. Graham 

215. Greek Reading. A continuation of course No. 214. (Credit given, 
but not applicable on two semesters required Exegesis). 

Juniors (J^), winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. Mr. Graham 

217. Biblical Interpretation, (a) The Oriental Mind: Jesus was an Ori' 
ental. Who ministered and preached to Orientals. Adequate interpretation 
of Scripture, therefore, demands an understanding of Oriental, and particularly 
Semitic, psychology and logic. A study is made of them, using the Scrip' 
tures and contemporary literature, together with experiences from modern 
Oriental life, for documentation. Lectures, readings, and discussion, (b) 
Hermeneutics proper: A review of the history of interpretation in the Church, 
with a determination of the principles of sound exegesis as exemplified in the 
grammatico'historical method. Lectures and discussion. 

Juniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

221. New Testament Introduction, (a) New Testament World: The his' 
torical setting in which the New Testament appeared, — old Greek religion,, 
later Hellenistic mystery religions, Hellenisticjudaism and the Jewish sects. 
(b) The Gospels and Acts: Introduction and survey. Synoptic and Johan' 
nine problems, Luke'Acts and apostolic history. Textbook, lectures and 
required readings. 

Middlers, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



26 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



222. New Testament Introduction, (a) Pauline Epistles: Historical, lit' 
erary and critical study with a survey of the text, (b) General Epistles: 
Introduction and survey. (c) Apocalypse: Introduction and survey. A 
sympathetic review of the various schools of interpretation. 

Middlers, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

242. New Testament Greek Exegesis. Epistle of the Romans: A re- 
view of the principles of Hermeneutics, followed by a critical study of the 
Greek text in application of these principles. The first few chapters are 
dealt with illustratively by lectures, followed by a general class assignment, 
the remainder of the term being given over to individual assignments. 
Lectures, collateral readings, reports and discussions. 

Middlers and qualified Juniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

243 New Testament Greek Exegesis. Epistle to the Hebrews: Contin- 
uation of the report and discussion method. (See Course No. 242 above). 
Middlers and qualified Juniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

250. New Testament Canon and Textual Criticism, (a) The Canon: A 
study of the formation of the New Testament. The limiting principle of 
the Canon and the consequent rejection of apocryphal and pseudepigraph' 
ical works. The position of the Roman Church, of the Church of 
England, and of the Presbyterian and Reformed bodies as shown in the West- 
minster Confession. Lectures and required readings. (b) Textual Criti- 
cism: A survey of the history of the printed text, with an introduction to 
the apparatus criticus and the principles of textual criticism. An appraisal 
of the Tischendorf, Nestle, and Westcott and Hort texts. Textbook, 
lectures and required readings. 

Elective, V/z quarter hours credit. (Given with No. 150). 

253. Greek Critical. In order to enable the students to meet the re- 
quirements of their respective presbyteries in connection with ordination, 
provision is made for each senior to present a critical paper on the Greek 
text of an assigned passage from the New Testament. There will be a 
minimum of three individual conferences by appointment, scheduled during 
the term for each registrant. Papers are due on the last Friday before 
the examinations of the term. 

Elective, Seniors, fall or winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

254. Readings in the Koine Papyri. An advanced course dealing with 
the non-literary papyri discovered within recent years. Their bearing upon 
our understanding of New Testament words and phrases. The aim is to 
provide a broader knowledge of first century thought for a fuller and more 
accurate interpretation of the New Testament. 

Elective, for advanced students, 3 quarter hours credit. 

255. Exegetical Seminar. For the advanced Greek student especially 
interested in Exegesis. A choice of research problems in exegesis is permit- 
ted each student. Reports for round-table discussion. A summary written 
paper is presented in lieu of a final examination. 

Elective, Seniors and qualified Middlers, 3 quarter hours credit. 

260. The Church and Its Art. (a) The Origin and Development of the 
Church Edifice, traced through the various architectural periods from the 
diaspora synagogues to the present, showing the different lines of influence. 
A discussion of architectural styles adaptable and suitable to the requirements 
of the American Church today. Illustrated lectures, readings and discussions. 
(b) Christian Art and Symbolism: A survey of Christian graphic and plastic 
art through the centuries. The importance of symbolism to the early Chris- 
tians, and its place in the Church's art today. Illustrated lectures, readings 
and discussions. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 27 



261. Critical Introduction to the Pauline Epistles. A rapid survey of 
Paul's life on the basis of a synthesis of the records in Acts and the Epistles. 
The origin and completion of the Corpus Paulinum. The groupings of 
the ten major epistles. Recent criticism of the authorship of II Thess., Col., 
Eph., and of the place of origin of the captivity correspondence. The prob' 
lems of Romans 16, and of the Pastorals. Sacramentalism, and other 
mystery features in Pauline theology. 

Elective, for advanced students, 3 quarter hours credit. 

262. Recent Developments in Synoptic Criticism. An introduction to 
formgeschichte, with a critical appraisal of its strong points and weaknesses, 
its possibilities and dangers. The possible permanent values which it may 
contribute in the field of New Testament study. An adequate working 
knowledge of Greek is required. 

Elective, for advanced students, 3 quarter hours credit. 

263. Critical Introduction to the Johannine Writings. An appraisal of 
recent criticism as to the unity of the Fourth Gospel and the so'called 
epistles, and as to the relationship of the Apocalypse to the Johannine group, 
dealing with the differences in grammar, vocabulary and thought'concepts. 
The Apocalypse in the field of apocalyptics. Antagonism toward it among 
the early Fathers and among the Reformers. 

Elective, for advanced students, 3 quarter hours credit. 

264. History of the Christian Liturgy. The liturgy of the Church traced 
from the pre'Christian synagogue through the period of development to the 
crystallization of the Roman rite in the time of Gregory III. Special study 
of the origins of the AntC'Communion (Proanaphora) and of the Commun' 
ion (Anaphora), and of their early association. The development of the 
Canonical Hours. Sources: I Clement, Ignatian Epistles, Didache, Justin's 
First Apology, Canons of Hyppolytus, and The Apostolic Constitutions. 

Elective, Seniors and Graduates, 3 quarter hours credit. 

265. Research in the New Testament. Directed research along various 
hnes as indicated by the student's needs. 

Elective, Graduate Students, 3 quarter hours credit. 



28 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



ENGLISH BIBLE 

Dr. Long 

It is the aim of this department to provide, in close co'Operation with 
other departments, a careful study of the content of the English Bible. 
Courses are designed so that, in connection with the Old Testament and New 
Testament departments, opportunity is given to the student to study, either 
in the original language or in English, every book of the Bible, with a view 
to securing not only a knowledge of the authorship, critical questions and 
historical background, but also a knowledge of the Scripture itself. 



312. The Gospels. There will be literary and historical study of the 
Gospels, covering their general features, a survey of their content and the 
relation of the Synoptics to the Fourth Gospel. Critical questions in con' 
nection with the Gospels will be studied in Course No. 221. 

Juniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



313. The Life of Christ. The life of Christ will be studied on the basis 
of the materials contained in the Gospels, — His birth, baptism, temptation, 
self'consciousness, teachings, miraculous activity, crucifixion, resurrection 
and ascension. 

Juniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



321. The Poetical Books. This course is designed to provide (a) a general 
introduction to the poetry and wisdom writings of the ancient Hebrews; (b) 
a comprehensive survey of the Psalter; and (c) an analysis of Job, Eccle' 
siastes and the Song of Songs. 

Middlers, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



332. The Eighth Century Prophets. There will be (a) a general survey 
of prophetism in Israel, its origin and development from earliest times to the 
time of the canonical prophets; (b) historical introduction to the Prophets 
of the Eighth Century, B.C.; and (c) a detailed study of Amos, Hosea, 
Micah and Isaiah. Attention will be given to the social ethics of these 
prophecies and their bearings on contemporary life. 

Seniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. Prof. Jackson 



333. The Later Prophets. The course includes a study of the historical 
introduction to and the contents of the writings of the prophets who ap' 
peared in the critical years of the late seventh century B.C., and in the re 
construction period following ehe exile. Attention will be given to the un' 
usual literary features, exegetical studies of outstanding passages, and the 
permanent values of the teachings of these prophets. 

Seniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. Prof. Jackson 

350. The Parables of Jesus. A careful study of the incomparable para' 
bles of our Lord, which occupied so large a place in His teaching. Attention 
will be given to their meaning for our Lord's hearers, and to their teaching 
for our own day. Homiletic values will be thoroughly reviewed. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 29 



352. The Gospel According to John. An intensive study of the content 
of this Gospel. While some attention is given to questions of introduction, 
the central emphasis is on the purpose, the message, and the contribution it 
makes to our interpretation of Christ. Homiletic values are specifically 
considered. 

Elective, Seniors and Graduates, 3 quarter hours credit. 

353. The Epistle to the Hebrews. This course consists of a somewhat 
detailed study of the contents and arrangement of the Epistle. The aim is 
not only to acquaint the student with the materials and the flow of the 
argument in this book, but with a method of Bible study by book and chapter. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Shear 

354. Isaiah I. A study of the first thirty-nine chapters of the Prophecy of 
Isaiah. Attention is given to the historic background, to the content, and 
especially to its relevance for our day. 

Elective, Seniors and Graduates, 3 quarter hours credit. 

355. Isaiah II. A study of chapters forty to sixtysix. A thorough review 
of the content is undertaken, with special emphasis upon its Messianic teach' 
ing. As in Isaiah I, homiletic values are given consideration. 

Elective, Seniors and Graduates, 3 quarter hours credit. 

356. Jeremiah. This course is a careful study of the life and work of this 
great prophet. Attention is given to the prophecy in the light of contempor- 
ary history and especially to the contribution made to the central message of 
the Bible. Its relevance for our day and its homiletical values are considered. 

Elective, Seniors and Graduates, 3 quarter hours credit. 

357. Ezekiel and Daniel. A study of the text, the exilic background and 
the post'exilic influence of Ezekiel. Problems presented by recent criticism 
are noted. Special attention is given to the symbolism and apocalyptic 
visions of Daniel in the hght of history. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Shear 



Courses in English Bible in Other Departments 

111, 112. Old Testament History. 

Juniors, 3 quarter hours credit for each course. Dr. Kelso 

113. Inter-Testament History. 

Elective, Juniors, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Kelso 

221, 222. New Testament Introduction. 

Middlers, 3 quarter hours credit for each course. Dr. Taylor 

455. Bible Characters. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Williamson 

751. Preaching from the Old Testament. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Shear 



30 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 

CHURCH HISTORY 
Dr. Williamson 



411. Church History, Apostolic and Ancient. From the apostolic age 
to the barbarian invasions. The Council of Jerusalem; the early Church, tne 
conflicts with heathenism and heresy, doctrinal controversies; the growth of 
ritual and discipline; great church leaders. 

Juniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



412. Mediaeval Church History. Barbarian invasions; growth in influ' 
ence of the papacy; Mohammedanism; the Holy Roman Empire; the Crusades; 
monastic orders; universities; Scholasticism; Mysticism; the Renaissance. 

Juniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



413. Modern Church History. The Reformation in different countries; 
the Countei-Reformation; the Puritans; the Pietists; American churches and 
their European antecedents, their origins, leaders and influence. 

Juniors, spring term, 4 quarter hours credit. 



431. Christian Missions. A survey of the progress of missions from the 
Apostolic days, with special emphasis on the modern missionary movement, 
beginning with William Carey. An examination of the principal mission 
fields, including those of the United Presbyterian Church. Missions in 
America. Lives of outstanding missionaries in various fields. The problems, 
methods, and opportunities of mission work. Methods of missionary in' 
struction in congregations. 

Seniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



433. Religious Movements in America. Revivalism; anti-Christian cults; 
Christian Science, Russellism, Mormonism, Spiritualism, etc. The Group 
aaovements. Great American preachers. 

Seniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



434. Church Government. Discussion method. Principles and forms 
of church government; government and discipline of the United Presbytc 
rian Church; church courts; practical workings of church law. 

Seniors, fall term, 1 quarter hour credit. 



450. Comparative Religion. An outline of the history, beliefs, literature 
and practices of the non-Christian religions, with special emphasis on Moham' 
medanism, Hinduism, and Buddhism. Elements of strength and of weakness 
in non'Christian faiths. Complete superiority of the Christian religion. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminartt 31 



451. The Early American Church. The European background of the 
American churches. The Puritans and Pilgrims. Persecution of Quakers, 
Baptists, etc. Roger WiUiams and rehgious hberty. Relation of the Church 
to the developing life of the different colonies. Liberal tendencies and re 
ligious diversities. The Great Awakening. The War of the Revolution and 
its effect on religious life. Nationalization of the churches in the United 
States. Missionary work at home and abroad. 

Elective, 1 quarter hour credit. 

453. American Church Biography. Lives and contemporary influence of 
outstanding ministers of America from colonial times to the present. Their 
methods and outstanding points of effectiveness. Great Christian laymen in 
different denominations. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

454. History of Doctrine. Influence of the Greek philosophers on Chris' 
tian thought. Christian apologetics. Development of Christology. History 
of anthropology, soteriology, eschatology, and symbols of the Church. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

455. Bible Characters. A study of many of the men and women of the 
Bible, some prominent and some obscure; an examination of their charac 
ter and the part they played for or against the plan of God; their inspiration 
or warning for today. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



32 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 

SYSTEMATIC AND BIBLICAL THEOLOGY 
Dr. Leitch 

The aim of this department is to get the student well grounded in the 
doctrines of our evangelical faith. The method includes assigned readings, 
lectures, note-book work and class-room discussion. The subject is taken up in 
the following order, the first few lessons serving the purpose of orientation. 

513. Systematic Theology. (a) Introduction to Theology: the idea 
purpose and importance of Theology; the source of material; the requisites 
to successful study; preview of the doctrinal system, (b) Revelation: the 
possibility and probability of special Revelation, the claims of Scripture, 
the credibility of the writers, various evidences of the supernatural character 
of the Bible, (c) The Inspiration of the Scriptures, as held by our Church, 
set forth and defended. 

Juniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

522. Systematic Theology, (a) The Doctrine of God: the attributes of 
the Divine Being; the tri-personality of God; the decrees and works of God, 
— creation, preservation and providence, (b) The Doctrine of Angels: their 
nature and employments. 

Middlers, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

523. Systematic Theology, (a) The Doctrine of Man: the origin and 
primitive state of man; the unity of the human race; essentials of the moral 
and spiritual nature, (b) The Doctrine of Sin: the Fall of man; the nature 
and universality of sin; the consequences of sin to mankind. 

Middlers, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

531. Systematic Theology, (a) The Doctrine of Christ the Redeemer: 
the preparation for redemption; the person of Christ, His two natures and 
states; the offices and work of Christ, with special study of the Atonement. 
(b) The Doctrine of the Holy Spirit: the application of redemption, — 
election, calling, regeneration, conversion, union with Christ, justification, 
adoption, sanctification. 

Seniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

532. Systematic Theology, (a) The Doctrine of the Church: its na- 
ture, membership, purpose and power; the sacraments of Baptism and the 
Lord's Supper, (b) The Doctrine of Last Things: death, the intermediate 
state, the second coming of Christ, the resurrection, the judgment and final 
awards. 

Seniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



533. Apologetics. The development and defense of Christianity, in which 
a survey is made of the old arguments against the Christian faith and the 
classical defenses which have been built up across the centuries. Special inter- 
est centers on the modern apologia for our faith. 

Seniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 33 



550. Doctrinal Thesis. In order to enable students to meet the require 
ments of their respective presbyteries in connection with ordination, prO' 
vision is made for the preparation of a Doctrinal Thesis. This involves 
intensive study in a well'defined field. In determining the subject, the 
student's preference is considered but his choice must have the approval 
of the department. Periodic reports of progress are required. The com' 
pleted manuscript is due on the day preceding term examinations. 

Elective. Middlers, spring term; or, Seniors, fall term; 3 quarter hours credit. 



551. Reformation Theologians: Martin Luther. Following a brief bio' 
graphical and historical study of Martin Luther, consideration is given to 
the leading features of Luther's teachings, especially as they are applicable 
to the problems of theology and churchmanship in our own day. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



552. Reformation Theologians: John Calvin. Following a brief biograph' 
ical and historical study of John Calvin, consideration is given to the leading 
features of Calvin's teachings, especially as they are applicable to the prob' 
lems of theology and churchmanship in our own day. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



553. Reformation Theologians: John Knox. Following a brief biographical 
and historical study of John Knox, consideration is given to the leading 
features of Knox's teachings, especially as they are applicable to the problems 
of theology and churchmanship in our own day. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

556. Modern Theology and Theologians. Beginning with the turn of the 
nineteenth century, a brief review is given of modern theological trends 
down to our own day. At this point, leaders in contemporary theology are 
reviewed from the standpoint of their major teachings and their relationship 
to perennial theological issues. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



34 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 

PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION AND RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 
Professor Jackson 
613. Introduction to Philosophy and Psychology of Religion. An intrc 
ductory study of the basic philosophical and psychological principles and 
problems involved in the religious experience. 

Juniors with inadequate philosophical background, spring term, 3 quarter 
hours credit. 

621. Christian Education. A course designed to give background for the 
modern approach to religious education. After a study of religious educa' 
tion in Biblical times and in the history of the Christian Church, attention 
is centered upon problems within the modern church. 

Middlers, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

631. Philosophy of Religion. A course designed to help the student con' 
struct a Christian world'view. This study looks especially to the confusions 
and needs of modern man, and gives guidance toward an integrated Christian 
faith. 

Seniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

650. Theory and Practice of the Devotional Life. A consideration of 
the devotional life of the Christian in the modern world. The relation of 
doctrine to the devotional life. Techniques toward the practice of the 
presence of God. This course is also designed to acquaint the student with 
the devotional classics. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

651. Psychology of Religion. After a brief historical survey of the field, 
an analysis is made of the various religious experiences, such as conversion, 
mysticism, prayer, worship, emotionalism. The latter part of the course 
views the pastor as counselor. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

652. Organization and Administration in Educational Programs. A com' 
prehensive study of the principles and methods of educational organization 
and administration as they may be applied to specific congregational prob' 
lems. Study is made of the Daily Vacation Bible School, the problem of 
week'day religious education in various public school systems, and the guid- 
ance by the pastor of the church school and youth fellowships in his own 
church. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

653. Methods of Religious Teaching. Educational methods as applicable 
to church situations. The general educational methods examined critically 
for purposes of use in dealing with the special problems of the church school. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

654. History of the Philosophy of Religion. A survey of some important 
philosophies of religion from Plato to Whitehead. OutHnes of these sys' 
tems presented, and their influence upon the Christian tradition traced. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

655. Problems in Modern Christian Thought. The aim of this course is 
to examine the chief philosophies and movements which confront the spread 
of the Gospel in our day, such as Naturalism, Humanism, Secularism, and 
Marxism. The resources of the Christian Faith are seen in the contemporary 
setting as providing an ample apologetic. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

656. Christian Ethics. The theological bases of ethics. Christian norms 
for ethical decisions. The problem of conscience; the meaning of community; 
the relation of love and justice; the Kingdom of God and history. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 35 

PRACTICAL THEOLOGY 
Dr. Shear 



711, 712. Homiletics. A basic course dealing with the planning, prepara' 
tion and delivery of sermons. The meaning and importance of preaching, 
the sources of material, the types of sermons, the choice of themes and texts, 
the sermon outline, — are some of the matters to be dealt with. Students 
are required to submit weekly for class criticism outlines of sermons on as' 
signed texts, and to prepare in full one sermon for pulpit delivery before 
the Faculty. 

Juniors, fall and winter terms, 3 quarter hours credit each term. 



721. Homiletics. Emphasis is placed in this course on expository preach' 
ing in the New Testament. The student is expected to submit for appraisal 
(a) weekly outHnes of sermons on assigned texts, (b) reports on sermons by 
representative preachers in the several periods of church history, (c) one fully 
written sermon on a text chosen by the student from an assigned book of 
the New Testament. 

Middlers, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



723. Pastoral Theology. This course introduces the student to the office 
and work of a pastor of a congregation. It deals, through lectures and dis' 
cussions, with the personality of the minister and his relations to the congre' 
gation, the community and the denomination. The student will read and sub' 
mit reviews of two books chosen from a designated list. 

Middlers, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



732. Pastoral Theology. A comprehensive course of lectures and discus' 
sions touching every phase of the pastoral relationship. It will deal with 
the pastor as a devout and humble servant of Jesus Christ, as a leader of 
public worship, as an administrator of the sacraments, as conductor of wed' 
dings and funerals, as director of Christian education, as evangelist, as mis' 
sionary leader, as organizer and administrator of church activities, as per' 
sonal counselor and visitor in homes and hospitals, as citizen in the community 
and nation. The Secretary of the Board of Administration will present a 
series of lectures dealing with the pastor's relations to the organized work 
of the denomination. 

Seniors, winter term, 4 quarter hours credit. 



750. Seminar in Sermon Composition. A course for advanced students 
who desire more training in the composition of sermons. Special attention 
will be given to richness of vocabulary, literary style, imaginative thought 
and use of illustration. Students submit their manuscripts for group dis' 
cussion. 

Elective, open only to advanced students who have had all required courses 
in homiletics, 3 quarter hours credit. 



36 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



751. Preaching from the Old Testament. The Scriptures which Jesus 
knew and of which he said, "These are they which bear witness of me," are 
rich mines of sermon suggestion and material. This course aims to offer 
suggestions as to themes and their development in all parts of the Old Testa- 
ment, historical, poetical and prophetical. Lectures will be supplemented 
by collateral reading and by the writing of sermons on assigned texts by 
the students. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



752. Preaching in the First Five Centuries. A study of the doctrinal and 
ethical content, the literary style, the homiletic method and the spiritual 
background of preaching in the early centuries from the days of the apostles 
to the break'up of the Roman Empire. Largely a reading course with class 
discussions. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



756. Rural Church Leadership, This is an auxiliary course in pastoral 
theology for those who expect to serve rural or small village churches in 
agricultural communities. Consideration will be given to the special social, 
economic and technical problems of agricultural people as they relate to the 
Church and Christian living. 

Elective, Seniors and Graduates, 3 quarter hours credit. 



757. Personal Evangelism. The primary aim of the Church is evangelism. 
This course deals first with the history of evangelism in general, and then 
with the modern renaissance of lay visitation evangelism. It aims to pre' 
pare the student for the work of organizing and carrying through a program 
of visitation evangelism through the Church or the Bible School. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



Special Announcement 



During the year 1949-1950, under the auspices of the Board 
of American Missions, a series of special lectures on problems in 
the field of Home Missions will be delivered by outstanding 
authorities. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 37 



Chapel Preaching 

Each student in the course of his work at the Seminary is required to 
preach three sermons (one each year) before the Faculty and student body. 
Texts or topics are assigned, and the sermons are criticized and graded on 
the basis of content, style and delivery. 



Field Work 
Six Units Required for Graduation 

A. Junior students are assigned to local churches under the direction of 
the respective pastors. The purpose is to give the student direct contact with, 
and practical experience in, the organizational activities of the church. The 
work to which students are assigned varies, depending upon local conditions 
and upon the student's capacity and adaptability. Ordinarily it consists of 
teaching, visiting, working with young people, supervising boys' groups, and 
assisting in the service of music and in the conduct of public worship. The 
student worker receives a minimum of $80.00 for the school year, together 
with necessary expenses, from the church he serves. Seminars, based on 
reports from the students and the fields, are conducted from time to time, 
as occasion requires. Two units toward graduation are given for satisfactory 
work in this field. 

B. For the four additional units in field work the student is ordinarily re- 
quired to spend the summer following the Middle Year (or the equivalent of 
four months), in a home mission station, or as a student pastor of a vacant 
congregation, or as a student assistant to a regular pastor. This work is under 
the joint supervision of the Secretary of the Board of American Missions, the 
Synodical Superintendent of Missions, and the Department of Practical 
Theology of the Seminary. The student will receive a minimum of $100.00 
per month, plus travehng expenses to and from his field. 

C. Middle and Senior students who, for one reason or another, wish to 
engage in extra-curricular field work during the school year, must secure 
special permission from the Faculty. No credit toward graduation will be 
given for this work, except by special action of the Faculty. 

D. Students of other denominations, in order to receive credit for similarly 
supervised field work in which they may engage, must explain the nature 
of such work to the Department of Practical Theology and secure the ap' 
proval of the Faculty. 



38 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 

Professor Barbe 

The purpose of this department is to assist each student to increase his 
effectiveness in public address and oral reading. Speech training is required 
of each student throughout the Junior year, or until sufficient ability is shown 
to enable him to discharge the speech responsibilities of a student preacher 
satisfactorily. 

The services of this department are available to all students needing special 
help with speech problems, especially in preparing for the delivery of sermons 
before the Faculty and student body. 

A recording is made of each chapel sermon for purposes of reference 
and study. 

A placement examination is given to all new students. Those who have 
had 4 to 6 semester credit hours in "Speech Fundamentals" at the college 
level and who meet the requirements of the placement examination will be 
placed in the advanced Junior speech class. 

811. Public Speaking. A study of the fundamental principles of speech, 
appertaining to both composition and delivery, with frequent classroom 
performances, criticized by the instructor. 

Juniors, fall term, 1 quarter hour credit. 

811 A. Advanced Public Speaking. This course is based strictly on the 
principles of persuasion and their application in public and non'public 
situations. 

Juniors, fall term, 1 quarter hour credit. 

812. Public Speaking. A continuation of Course No. 811, with exercises in 
voice production and articulation. Recordings will be used in the study of 
individual voice problems of students. 

Juniors, winter term, 1 quarter hour credit. 

812A. Advanced Public Speaking. A continuation of Course No. 81 lA, 
with attention to the basic psychological principles which are important 
in controlling the belief and behaviour of various types of audiences. Ex' 
perience in speaking before the classroom audience. 

Juniors, winter term, 1 quarter hour credit. 

813. Public Speaking. Study of interpretative reading. Discussion of 
problems and principles of oral reading. Practice in reading all types of 
literature, especially as found in the Scriptures. 

Juniors, spring term, 1 quarter hour credit. 

851. Radio Speaking. Discussion of the principles involved in the pre- 
paration of radio speeches, sermons, interviews, and round tables. Practice 
in basic techniques of microphone presentation. 

Elective, 1 quarter hour credit. 

852. Radio Speaking. Continuation of Course No. 851, with study of radio 
speakers and religious broadcasts. Basic techniques of programing and use 
of the recorder. 

Elective, 1 quarter hour credit. 

854. Material for Public Speech. Requirements, methods of presentation, 
mannerisms. Public Reading, introducing a speaker, after'dinner speaking, 
parliamentary procedure. This course is only supplementary to the work of 
this department. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Williamson 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 39 

THE GRADUATE DEPARTMENT 

The Degree offered: The degree of Master of Theology 
(Th.M.) is granted to those candidates who fulfill the necessary 
requirements, as listed below. This is an earned professional 
degree indicating advanced study and proficiency in theological 
subjects. 

Entrance Requirements: Every applicant for admission to 
the Graduate Department must make application on the form pro- 
vided for that purpose, and must present the following credentials: 
(1) A letter from the clerk of his presbytery, or corresponding 
church officer, indicating that he is a member in good standing of 
some evangelical church and is officially recommended as a student 
of theology; (2) complete official transcripts of academic credits 
beyond high school, including evidence that he holds (a) the A.B. 
degree, or an equivalent degree, from an accredited college or uni- 
versity, and (b) the B.D. degree, or an equivalent degree, from this 
or some other accredited seminary or theological school; (3) sat- 
isfactory testimonials from at least three references in response 
to the Seminary's questionnaire. One or more of these require- 
ments may be waived in cases where adequate information is al- 
ready on file in the Seminary. Acceptance as a bona fide Grad- 
uate Student will be determined by the Faculty's Graduate Studies 
Committee on the basis of complete and satisfactory credentials. 

Fields of Study: At the initiation of his graduate work, the 
student must indicate the field in which he expects to do his 
major work. The following four fields are determined: (For 
available courses, see page 22.) 

I. Biblical Literature and Interpretation. 
II. History of Church and Doctrine. 

III. Christian Education and Philosophy. 

IV. Practical Theology and Administration. 

Graduation Requirements: A total of 34 quarter hour credits 
is required for the Master's degree, 27 credits being allowed for 
the required classroom work and 7 credits for an acceptable 
thesis. Of the 27 hours of classroom work, 18 quarter hours must 
be taken in the student's major field. The remaining 9 quarter 
hours may be elected by the student in any of the other fields. 
The class work calls for a minimum of one academic year of three 
quarters, of not less than 9 quarter hours each. The equivalent 
hours may be spread out, but the total period involved must not 



40 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 

exceed three academic years except by special action of the Grad- 
uate Studies Committee of the Faculty. 

Thesis Requirements: The required thesis is to be written 
upon some subject related to the student's work in his major 
field. This subject, together with a provisional outline and a basic 
bibliography for the thesis, must be approved by the professor 
under whom the student is doing his major work. Notification of 
final decision in these matters is to be made to the Graduate Studies 
Committee not later than November 1st preceding the May Com- 
mencement at which the student anticipates receiving his degree. 
The student will arrange with his major professor for a vmiimum 
of three consultations while the thesis is in process of preparation. 
The number of these required consultations may be increased at 
the discretion of the professor concerned. 

Two copies of the finished thesis (one of which may be a 
first carbon) must be delivered to the Graduate Studies Committee 
at least two calendar months prior to the May Commencement at 
which the student expects to receive his degree. For this purpose 
they should be bound in substantial temporary binders. Upon 
final approval by the Graduate Studies Committee, these two 
copies will be permanently bound by the Seminary Library, the 
expense thereof being wholly chargeable to the student. If the 
student desires to keep a copy of his thesis for himself, he should 
so provide. 

Credits Transjerable jrom other Schools: Credits for graduate 
courses taken in other theological schools or seminaries are trans- 
ferable toward the Th.M. degree, subject to the final approval of 
the Graduate Studies Committee in each individual instance; 
but such transferred credits cannot exceed 9 quarter hours in 
value. It is in all cases necessary, therefore, that a minimum of 
25 quarter hours be earned in residence. 

Time Limit: Under normal conditions, and except by special 
action of the Graduate Studies Committee to the contrary, all 
work for the degree inclusive of the thesis must be completed 
within four calendar years from the date of the student's matricu- 
lation in the Graduate Department. 

Expenses: Students will, of course, be expected to purchase 
any textbooks which their professors may require. 

The following fees and tuitions are charged to graduate 
students, both as candidates for degrees, and as auditors in the 
seminary: 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 41 



(1) Graduate Matriculation Fee, payable upon entrance . $ 5.00 

(2) Regular Tuition Fee, payable upon registration for 
each quarter as follows: 

(a) For 3 courses (9 quarter hours) .... 10.00 

(b) For 2 courses (6 quarter hours) .... 8.00 

(c) For 1 course (3 quarter hours) .... 5.00 

(3) Diploma Fee, payable 1? days prior to granting the degree 5.00 

Note: Graduate fees, excepting the diploma fee, are applied in building 
up the Graduate Section of the Library, and in the purchase of other Grad' 
uate Department supplies and equipment. 

Communications: Additional information relative to the work of the 
Graduate Department, together with forms for Application for Admission, 
may be secured by addressing: 

The DepartTYient of Graduate Studies 

The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 

616 West North Avenue, Pittsburgh 12, Pa. 



SUMMER INSTITUTES OF THEOLOGY 
During the summer of 1946 the Seminary-sponsored Summer 
Institutes of Theology were inaugurated, the first being held on 
the campus of Westminster College, New Wilmington, Pa., and 
the second on Monmouth College campus, Monmouth, Illinois. 
Both institutes received a warm welcome from the Church's re- 
turning chaplains and from her regular ministry. Nineteen re- 
turned chaplains took advantage of the New Wilmington Insti- 
tute that first summer; a slightly smaller number were in at- 
tendance at Monmouth. In 1948 the Midwest Institute was 
moved to the Sterling campus in Kansas. 

The two institutes will be available to our ministry again in 
1949, — at New Wilmington, Pa., June 6-10, and at Sterling, Kan- 
sas, June 13-17. Well-known Christian leaders from other denom- 
inations will serve as guest lecturers, thus augmenting the regular 
Faculty of the Seminary on the teaching staffs of both institutes. 
In the congenial atmosphere of our college campuses, with 
lodging in comfortable dormitory quarters, an ideal recreational 
week is provided for our ministers at a very nominal cost. Here 
they renew old friendships with college and seminary classmates. 
Here they receive inspiration through guided Bible study, lec- 
tures on preaching and pastoral work, and discussion in the 
various fields of theology. Here are found mental and spiritual 
stimulation and fresh ideas for both homiletic and pastoral work, 
as men come to grips with the problems of the Church in our con- 
temporary world. Physical, intellectual, and spiritual refresh- 
ment is the goal of the institutes. 



42 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



AFFILIATION WITH THE UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 

Graduates from the three-year course of Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Theological Seminary who desire to take the A.M. degree at the 
University of Pittsburgh in the field of Religion and Religious 
Education may transfer as many as 14 semester credits (equiva- 
lent to 21 quarter hours) from the Seminary as advanced standing 
toward this degree. The remaining ten course credits and six 
thesis credits required for the A.M. degree must be taken at the 
University of Pittsburgh. A part of the ten course credits may 
be taken in other fields of the University than Religion and Re- 
ligious Education. 

Graduates of Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary will be 
allowed a maximum of 30 graduate credits (equivalent to 45 
quarter hours) as advanced standing toward the Ph.D. degree in 
Religion and Religious Education. An additional amount of 
six graduate credits may be granted to students taking courses 
at the Seminary beyond the regular three-year theological course, 
in which cases the courses must be agreed upon by the Graduate 
School of the University of Pittsburgh. 

The University of Pittsburgh will accept graduate credits from 
Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary in the fields of Biblical 
Literature, Church History, Theology, History and Philosophy of 
Religion, and Religious Education. 

The amount of advanced graduate standing granted to Semi- 
nary students who choose to do their major work at the University 
in fields other than Religion and Religious Education will be de- 
termined by heads of these departments. The advanced standing 
for both the A.M. and Ph.D. degree will vary some with depart- 
ments and students. 

A regular summer session or semester must elapse between the 
time of the student's graduation from the Seminary and the con- 
ferring of a graduate degree by the University of Pittsburgh. 

The procedure outlined in the foregoing paragraphs became 
effective February, 1933. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 43 



THE DEPARTMENT OF CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

The Department of Christian Education opened with the Fall 
Term of 1947, as an expansion of the Department of Philosophy 
of Religion and Religious Education. Approved by the General 
Assembly of the United Presbyterian Church the preceding May, 
this Department was inaugurated to meet the growing need in our 
Church for trained lay leaders. 

The Purpose of the Department is to instruct young people, 
dedicated to full-time Christian service, in the knowledge of the 
doctrines and order of worship taught in the Scriptures and set 
forth in the standards of the United Presbyterian Church of North 
America; to assist them to grow in the Christian faith and life 
and to acquire the technical skill necessary for effective service 
in the Name and Spirit of Christ. 

Its Particular Field is the education of young women for 
church vocations as non-ministerial, professional lay workers. It 
does not enter the field of the Seminary proper in preparing 
young men for ordination. 

The Program of Training covers a period of two academic 
years, each of which is divided into three terms, or "quarters," of 
eleven weeks each. The annual session begins the second Wednes- 
day of September and continues thirty-five weeks Including holi- 
days. 

Preparation for Entrance. Prospective students are urged 
to give careful attention during their college days to the Pre- 
Seminary Studies approved by the American Association of Theo- 
logical Schools and described on page 13 of this catalogue. It 
is also recommended that all applicants for entrance should qual- 
ify as good typists and pianists: for such technical skill is invalu- 
able in the field of Christian Education. 



44 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



Academic Regulations. Except in so far as expressly modi- 
fied, the Academic Regulations of the Seminary proper apply 
also to the Department of Christian Education. 

Admission. The normal time for entrance is at the beginning 
of the annual session in September. Application for admission 
should be made well in advance, on the official form, which may be 
secured from the Registrar's office. Each application should be 
accompanied by a small recent photograph of the applicant, to- 
gether with a statement of personal reasons for entering Christian 
work; and should be followed promptly by the credentials men- 
tioned below. 

Credentials. The following credentials will be required of 
each applicant for admission to the Department of Christian 
Education: 1) A Letter of Introduction from Pastor, or Session, 
testifying to Christian character, active church membership, and 
general fitness for Christian service; 2) A Letter from the Clerk 
of Presbytery, or corresponding church officer, indicating official 
acceptance as a candidate for Christian service and recommenda- 
tion as a student in the Department of Christian Education; (ap- 
plicant consult pastor as to the proper procedure); 3) Complete 
official Transcript of Academic Credits, beginning with high 
school record unless the applicant has completed two or more years 
of college work; (the degree of A.B., or an equivalent degree, 
from an accredited college or university, is required for admission) ; 
4) Satisfactory Testimonials from at least three personal refer- 
ences as indicated on the application blank. 

Classification of Students. In the two-year program of train- 
ing, regular degree students are classed as Juniors during their 
first year, and as Seniors during their second year. 

Field Work. A limited amount of Field Work, — not more 
than 10 hours per week and not less than 4 hours per week, — will 
be required of all regular degree students during both their Junior 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 45 



and Senior years. The academic value of this work, together with 
the correlated class work, is recognized in the form of 6 quarter 
hour credits applicable toward the degree. 

The Degree of Master of Religious Education will be con- 
ferred by the Seminary upon all who complete the course of study 
and training described on the following pages and therein meet 
all the requirements of the Faculty. At least one year of work 
in residence is necessary for graduation. The successful candidate 
must earn a minimum of 94 quarter hour credits and maintain 
more than average ability in every department. 

Financing the Course. In matters of expense and aid, stu- 
dents in the Department of Christian Education attend on the 
same basis as regular students in the Undergraduate Department 
of the Seminary. There is no charge for tuition, or for room rent 
except in the case of married students with families. For the 
usual academic fees, an estimate of personal expenses, and the 
amount of aid to be expected from the Board of Christian Educa- 
tion, see page 59. 



46 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



CURRICULUM OF CHRISTIAN EDUCATION IN OUTLINE 



Junior Year 



Fall Term 



Winter Term 



912 Worship and Music 

918 Field Work Practicum 

102 Geography of Bible Lands 

312 The Gospels 

502 Survey of Theology 

652 Organization & Administration 
in Educational Programs 



Spring Term 



913 Christian Education of Adults 
919 Field Work Practicum 
103 Survey of 0. T. History 
203 Survey of N. T. Introduction 
313 The Life of Christ 
— Elective 



Qr. 

Hrs. 



911 Christian Educa. of Children 3 

914 Thesis Research 1 

917 Field Work Practicum 1 

217 Biblical Interpretation 3 

301 Survey of English Bible 3 

621 Christian Education 3 

811 Public Speaking (or 811A) 1 

15 



Qr. 
Hrs. 



Qr. 

Hrs. 



3 
1 
3 
3 
3 
3 
16 



Senior Year 



Fall Term 



Winter Term 



Spring Term 



Note: Typing^ and Piano will be provided for those students who are not pro- 
ficient in them. 

Required courses are described on the following pages. 
Elective courses are described in the Curriculum of the Undergraduate 
Department. 



Qr. 
Hr^ 



921 Christian Educa. of Adolescents 

924 Church Drama (Given with 201) 

927 Field Work Practicum 

201 Church Art 

321 Poetical Books 

431 Christian Missions 

— Elective 



925 Thesis 

928 Field Work Practicum 
332 Eighth Century Prophets 
402 Survey of Church History 
757 Personal Evangelism 
— ■ Elective 



926 Thesis 

929 Field Work Practicum 

434 Church Government 

533 Apologetics 

^ Electives 

Total Quarter Credit Hours 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 47 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

Professor Jackson Miss Lewis 



621. Christian Education. A course designed to give background for the 
modern approach to religious education. After a study of rehgious education 
in Bibhcal times and in the history of the Christian Church, attention is cen' 
tered on problems within the modern church. 

Juniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. Prof. Jackson 



652. Organization and Administration in Educational Programs. A com- 
prehensive study of the principles and methods of educational organization 
and administration as they may be applied to specific congregational prob' 
lems. Study is made of the Daily Vacation Bible School, the problem of 
week'day religious education in various public school systems, and the guid' 
ance by the pastor of the church school and youth fellowships in his own 
church. 

Juniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. Prof. Jackson 



911. Christian Education of Children. A study of the total Christian 
Education Program for Children from PrcSchool through the Junior Dc 
partment. Methods, Materials, and Organization for teaching the Christian 
Religion to children are stressed. Introduced by a background study of the 
psychological developments of the child and his correlated religious needs. 
(Alternates with No. 921). 

Juniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. Miss Lewis 



912. Worship and Music. A practical course dealing with the elements 
of public worship. It includes an outline of the historical background of 
worship; emphasis on the importance of music to worship and the selection of 
hymns and Scripture; and practice in developing and leading worship, both 
formal and informal. Special reference to plans and programs for Church 
School. 

Juniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. Miss Lewis 



913. Christian Education of Adults. A study of the Church's program 
for Adults, with emphasis on adult needs and problems, and methods that 
will meet those needs. Discussion on the Church and the Home, and Parent 
Education. 

Juniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. WGss Lewis 



914. Thesis Research. This course is designed to acquaint the first 
year class with the various types of educational research and to prepare each 
student to do creditable research in the field selected for specific study. 
(Pre'requisite to Thesis credit). 

Juniors, fall term, 1 quarter hour credit. Miss Lewis 



48 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



917, 918, 919. Field Work Practicum. A class forum based on field work 
problems and the practical application of classroom teaching. Credit for 
these courses is given at the end of the school year upon the successful com' 
pletion of the Field Work, required written reports, and regular conferences. 

Juniors, fall, winter and spring; 1 quarter hour credit each term. Miss Lewis 

921. Christian Education of Adolescents. A look at the Adolescent, — 
his psychological background and his religious needs, — and a study of the 
available material and methods for use with youth groups. (Alternates with 
No. 911). 

Seniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. Miss Lewis 

924. Church Drama. A course in the use of Drama in the Christian Ed' 
ucation program. The work includes discussion of the problems of produC' 
tion, and practice in directing, acting, and stage makeup. (Given with 
No. 201). 

Seniors, fall term, 2 quarter hours credit. Miss Lewis 

925, 926. Thesis for Degree of M. R. E. The satisfactory completion 
of a research project is one of the requirements for the Degree of Master 
of Religious Education. The subject and tentative outline of the thesis must 
be officially approved not later than April 1st of the first year of residence. 
Regularly scheduled conferences with the advisor are required during the 
progress of this research. The completed thesis must be turned in not later 
than March 1st preceding the granting of the degree. Two bound type' 
written copies of the thesis must be deposited in the Seminary Library at 
least two weeks before the date of graduation. 

Seniors, winter and spring; 3 quarter hours credit each term. Miss Lewis 

927, 928, 929. Field Work Seminar. Second year forum on the practical 
application of the principles taught. Discussion of practical points in Church 
Office Administration, with special attention to records and the use of the 
mimeograph; followed by discussion of leadership, professional ethics and 
the social requirements of the profession. 

Seniors, fall, winter and spring; 1 quarter hour credit each term. Miss Lewis 

951. The Use of the Bible with Youth. A laboratory course in Bible 
Study; experimentation with and analysis of various methods of Bible teach' 
ing; an opportunity for creative study from the viewpoint of both student 
and teacher. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. R'liss Lewis 



Courses in the Curriculum of Christian Education 
given by other Professors 

102. Geography of Bible Lands. A survey course correlating the major 
geographical features of the ancient orient with Biblical history, and dealing 
more fully with the geography of Palestine in relation to the history, cus' 
toms and manners of its peoples. 

Juniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Kelso 

103. Survey of Old Testament History. A study of the history of the 
Hebrews from the days of Abraham to the close of the Old Testament, with 
special emphasis on the more significant personalities, events, and institU' 
tions. Relevant archaeological data are studied in conjunction with the 
Biblical record. 

Juniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Kelso 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 49 



201. Church Art. (a) A rapid survey of the development of the Chris' 
tian church building with elucidation of those features which became pecu' 
liarly characteristic of Christian architecture. (b) A brief introduction to 
Christian Symbology. (c) A rapid survey of Christian painting and decor' 
ation from the catacomb murals to the Renaissance. (Given with No. 924). 

Seniors, fall term, 1 quarter hour credit. Dr. Taylor 

203. Survey of New Testament Introduction, (a) The Graeco'Roman 
World as a setting for the New Testament literature, (b) The development 
and content of the New Testament literature: i) the Pauline letters, ii) the 
Gospels and the Acts, iii) the other Epistles, iv) the Revelation. Brief 
treatment will be accorded the Synoptic and Johannine problems and Chris' 
tian apocalyptic. 

Juniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Taylor 

217. Biblical Interpretation, (a) The Oriental Mind: Jesus was an Ori' 
ental, Who ministered and preached to Orientals. Adequate interpretation 
of Scripture, therefore, demands an understanding of Oriental, and particularly 
Semitic, psychology and logic. A study is made of them, using the Scrip' 
tures and contemporary literature, together with experiences from modern 
Oriental life, for documentation. Lectures, readings, and discussion. (b) 
Hermeneutics proper: A review of the history of interpretation in the Church, 
with a determination of the principles of sound exegesis as exemplified in the 
grammatico'historical method. Lectures and discussion. 

Juniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Taylor 

301. Survey of the English Bible. This course will include (a) an intro' 
duction to the English Bible designed to give the student a working knowh 
edge of the Book by examining the diversity and interrelation of constituent 
parts and the contribution each makes to the whole; and (b) a study of the 
history of the EngHsh Bible, in which will be reviewed the early manuscript 
versions, Jerome and the Vulgate, Wyclif, Tyndale and Coverdale, the Rheims 
and Douay Bibles, the King James Version and its influence on British and 
American history, the British and American Revisions, and modern versions. 

Juniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Long 

312. The Gospels. There will be literary and historical study of the 
Gospels, covering their general features, a survey of their content and the 
relation of the Synoptics to the Fourth Gospel. Critical questions in con' 
nection with the Gospels will be studied in Course No. 221. 

Juniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Long 

313. The Life of Christ. The Life of Christ will be studied on the basis 
of the materials contained in the Gospels, — His birth, baptism, temptation, 
self'consciousness, teachings, miraculous activity, crucifixion, resurrection 
and ascension. 

Juniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Long 

321. The Poetical Books. This course is designed to provide (a) a general 
introduction to the poetry and wisdom writings of the ancient Hebrews; (b) 
a comprehensive survey of the Psalter; and (c) an analysis of Job, Ecclc 
siastes and the Song of Songs. 

Seniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Long 



50 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



332. The Eighth Century Prophets. There will be (a) a general survey 
of prophetism in Israel, its origin and development from earliest times to the 
time of the canonical prophets; (b) historical introduction to the Prophets 
of the Eighth Century, B.C.; and (c) a detailed study of Amos, Hosea, 
Micah and Isaiah. Attention will be given to the social ethics of these 
prophecies and their bearings on contemporary life. 

Seniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. Prof. Jackson 

402. Survey of Church History. A rapid review of the History of the 
Church dealing with persons, events, and movements of outstanding im' 
portance from the time of the Apostles to the present day. 

Seniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Williamson 

431. Christian Missions. A survey of the progress of missions from the 
Apostolic days, with special emphasis on the modern missionary movement, 
beginning with William Carey. An examination of the principal mission 
fields, including those of the United Presbyterian Church. Missions in 
America. Lives of outstanding missionaries in various fields. The problems, 
methods, and opportunities of mission work. Methods of missionary in' 
struction in congregations. 

Seniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. I>r. Williamson 

434. Church Government. Discussion method. Principles and forms 
of church government; government and discipline of the United Presbyterian 
Church; church courts; practical workings of church law. 

Seniors, spring term, 2 quarter hours credit. Dr. Williamson 

502. Survey of Theology. By class room lectures supplemented by out' 
side reading, the great articles of our faith are brought under review with 
intent to give the student an intelligent grasp of the Christian system of 
thought. The treatment throughout is positive, doctrine being grounded in 
Scripture and evaluated in terms of Christian faith and life. 

Juniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Leitch 

533. Apologetics. The development and defense of Christianity, in which 
a survey is made of the old arguments against the Christian faith and the 
classical defenses which have been built up across the centuries. Special inter' 
est centers on the modern apologia for our faith. 

Seniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Leitch 

'75'7, Personal Evangelism. The primary aim of the Church is evangelism. 
This course deals first with the history of evangehsm in general, and then 
with the modern renaissance of lay visitation evangelism. It aims to prepare 
the student for the work of organizing and carrying through a program of 
visitation evangelism through the Church or the Bible School. 

Seniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Shear 

811. Public Speaking, or 

81 lA. Advanced Public Speaking, as may be indicated by the needs of the 
individual student. (See page 38.) 

Juniors, fall term, 1 quarter hour credit. Prof. Barbe 




u 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 51 



FACILITIES FOR STUDY 



THE SEMINARY LIBRARY 

The Seminary Library comprising over 40,000 volumes is 
adequately housed within the Seminary building. The library 
facilities were completely renovated and modernized when the 
Pittsburgh and Xenia Seminaries were merged in 1930. The Main 
Reference Room, immediately to the left as one enters the build- 
ing, was furnished with the most up-to-date equipment by the 
Sixth United Presbyterian Church of Pittsburgh as an expression 
of its continuing interest in the Seminary. Significant panels, in 
which the artist has portrayed the historic insignia of the older 
Presbyterian and Reformed Churches of the world, decorate the 
upper walls of the room, reminding the student of his ecclesias- 
tical heritage. There is also the Periodical Room where the finest 
current magazines of popular and general Christian interest are 
to be found, while the more technical theological and Biblical 
journals are available in the Main Reference Room. There are 
also ample stack rooms with steel shelving and a commodious 
vault for rare and historic books and documents. 

An increasingly large investment in both new and older out- 
of-print books is being made by the Seminary each year. A 
Booklist of the year's accessions is published annually in May, 
Gifts of both books and money from the many friends of the 
Seminary are received annually and are very greatly appreciated. 

The Newburgh Collection 

The research department of the Library contains the now 
priceless collection of classic theological works, many of which 
date from the early days of printing and from the Reformation, 
which were secured abroad by the Rev. John M. Mason, D.D., in 
connection with the founding of the Seminary of New York, after- 
wards the Newburgh Seminary. 

The James Law Library Fund 

Through the liberality of the late James Law, Esq., of Shus- 
han, N. Y., there was conveyed to the Seminary several years ago 
the sum of ^15,000, to be employed as a library endowment. The 
'nterest from this sum augments annual purchases. 



52 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



The Nina S. Brittain Collection 

Through the generosity of Frank J. Brittain, Esq., of Erie, 
Pennsylvania, the sum of $5,000 is to be used over a period of 
years for the direct purchase of theological and related works. These 
books are known as the Nina S. Brittain Collection. 

Library Hours 

The Library is open week days to all, without restriction of 
creed, subject to the same rules as those which apply to students. 
The hours are 9 A.M. to 1 P.M., and 2 to 5:30 P.M., excepting 
Saturday when the closing hour is 12 noon. When the Seminary 
is in session the Library is also open evenings, Monday through 
Friday, from 7 to 10 P.M. 

THE BIBLE LANDS MUSEUM 

The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary is one of the 
most active seminaries in the world engaged in archaeological 
research of Bible times in ancient Palestine. In conjunction with 
the American School of Oriental Research at Jerusalem, it has 
conducted explorations at Sodom and Gomorrah in 1924, excava- 
tions at Kirjath-Sepher in 1926, 1928, 1930, 1932, and excava- 
tions at Bethel in 1934. 

This work was inaugurated by the late Dr. M. G. Kyle, 
formerly Professor of Biblical Archaeology, who served as presi- 
dent of all these expeditions with the exception of the last: it 
was conducted after his death as a memorial to his work in 
Palestinian archaeology. The share of these antiquities which 
the Palestinian Archaeological Museum has allotted to the Semi- 
nary has been shipped to Pittsburgh, where more than a thousand 
of these objects are now on exhibit. Numerous other valuable 
pieces are awaiting special preparation before being placed on 
exhibition. 

These objects all illustrate in the most striking way the life 
of the people of Bible Lands, and so become of great value for 
interpretation as well as for apologetics. They illumine and 
corroborate the Biblical narratives. Thus an ineffaceable impres- 
sion is made upon the student of the trustworthiness of the Biblical 
record, for only real events leave anything to be dug up out of the 
ground. The objects in the Museum are used constantly in the 
classes of the Seminary. Opportunity is also afforded the public 
to visit the Museum at appointed times. 

Special gifts of archaeological specimens are being constantly 
added to the Museum through interested friends. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 53 



CULTURAL ADVANTAGES 



THE DENOMINATIONAL SEMINARY 
The denominational Seminary has peculiar advantages. Being 
under direct church control, it certifies its graduates as trained by 
thoroughly responsible teachers. The established standards are 
maintained, and approved educational methods are followed. 
Without dwarfing individuality, the church school gives to its 
graduates the unique stamp which wins recognition within denomi- 
national bounds. At the same time, the commingling of students 
from various evangelical bodies tends to develop in them a mu- 
tual understanding and brotherly regard. The wide range of ac- 
quaintance with the Church and its leaders secured by attendance 
at the Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary is also for the student an asset 
of great value. 

A METROPOLITAN ENVIRONMENT 

Pittsburgh has numerous elements of cultural value, chief 
among which are her schools and churches. The church life of our 
own and other denominations in Pittsburgh is of the best. The city 
and its environs, including more than eighty of our own congrega- 
tions, afford an excellent example of the Church at work. In all 
the denominations the religious thought Is conservative and the 
methods of work progressive. The pulpits are well manned and 
the work generally well organized. Some of the ablest preachers 
of our own and other churches are located here. The student has 
opportunity to study the methods of men who are widely known 
as successful ministers. He may see mission work carried on along 
improved lines, and engage in it himself. He may study at first 
hand the most effective methods of Sabbath-school and Young 
People's work. He is welcomed to the weekly meetings of the 
local ministerial unions, where live problems and issues are the 
subjects of discussion. 

Pittsburgh is one of the strongest centers of Presbyterianism 
in the world. In the city and its immediate environs are more than 
250 congregations of the Presbyterian and Reformed family of 
churches, comprising more than 120,000 communicants. In the 
metropolitan area are to be found several of Presbyterianism's 
most influential pulpits; and many of the finest and most pro- 
gressive rural parishes are within easy driving distance of the city. 



54 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 

Pittsburgh, together with the contiguous towns, is one of the 
great commercial centers of the world. It affords unexcelled oppor- 
tunities for the study of social, economical, political, racial, and 
other problems. It is in itself an education to live and work in such 
a city and catch the pulse of its busy life. Moreover, the benefit 
of contact with those engaged in the varied forms of work for social, 
moral and religious betterment, and of personal experience in such 
efforts is evident to all. 

THE ALLEGHENY OBSERVATORY 
The Observatory is one of the oldest astronomical institutions 
in the country. It is affiliated with the University of Pittsburgh, 
but is located in Riverview Park, one of the highest points in 
Allegheny County. By special arrangements with the Director, 
the students of the Seminary have free access to it and the privilege 
of observing the heavens through its famous lenses. The stellar 
photographs are thrown on the screen, and these and the instru- 
ments and their workings explained to the students. 

THE BUHL PLANETARIUM 
Of the five planetaria in America, Pittsburgh now claims the 
finest and most up-to-date. Provided by the Buhl Foundation at 
a cost of over a million dollars, the Buhl Planetarium and Institute 
of Popular Science is located between the Post Office and the 
Carnegie Library, North Side, within a few minutes' walk of the 
Seminary. Its most distinctive feature is the Theatre of the Stars 
under the large dome which crowns the building. Here, by means 
of the intricate Zeiss projector, the lecturer can give to 450 visitors 
at once a realistic view of the heavens as they appear from any 
part of the earth at any time. In addition to the central auditor- 
ium, there are six galleries for scientific exhibits in which the 
various achievements of science are vividly set forth. A lecture 
hall, seating 250, has modern equipment for sound-motion pic- 
tures, lantern slides and demonstration experiments. Four well- 
equipped work rooms are provided for the Amateur Astronomers' 
Association of Pittsburgh. Fall, winter, and spring short-term 
evening classes in science are offered for laymen. High School 
Science Demonstration Lectures, the School Science Fair, Junior 
High School Conducted Tours, and the Congress for Science Stu- 
dents, are some of the school activities provided by the Planetar- 
ium. Mr. Arthur L. Draper Is the Director of this unique insti- 
tution of education and culture. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 55 



LIFE AT THE SEMINARY 



THE SEMINARY BUILDING 

The Seminary hall is located at the corner of North Avenue 
and Buena Vista Street, and overlooks West Park. On the first 
floor are the Mary J. Stevenson Reception Room, the President's 
Office, the Pressly Chapel, the Library, the Reference and Reading 
Rooms, and the Gymnasium. On the second floor are the Faculty 
Conference Room, the Bible Lands Museum, and five classrooms 
of ample proportions. The third, fourth and fifth floors are 
given over to dormitory uses. The dining room and kitchen are 
on the fifth floor. 



ACCOMMODATIONS FOR UNMARRIED MEN 

The dormitory rooms are arranged as follows: there are single 
rooms; suites of double rooms, in which two men occupy a study 
and a bedroom in common; and suites of three rooms, in which 
two men have a study in common and two single bedrooms ad- 
joining. There is a trunk room on the third floor. Each floor has 
bathrooms and lavatories. The Seminary provides furniture and 
bedding, including sheets, pillow cases, and one blanket for each 
bed. Students should bring extra blankets for their own use. 
Students will also furnish towels for their own use and provide 
for the laundering of these. All other dormitory laundry work 
will be looked after by the Seminary. 

With the purpose of contributing to the comfort and health 
of the students, the oversight and maintenance of the rooms in the 
dormitory are placed in charge of a Committee of women appointed 
by the Board of Directors. Rooms are inspected from time to 
time. The ordinary supervision and control of the dormitory 
is committed to the President's Secretary. 

Rooms are provided free of charge to students who take not 
less than twelve hours of concurrent Seminary work. Rooms 
are assigned by the President's Secretary, reasonable consider- 
ation being given to the student's preference and to the date of 
his application for living quarters. 



56 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



APARTMENTS FOR MARRIED STUDENTS 
The upper floors of the Seminary building contain several 
two and three-room apartments which are available at a nominal 
charge to married students without children. Heat and light are 
supplied, but there are no Individual cooking facilities. Men and 
their wives are, therefore, required to take their meals with the 
Student Eating Club which Is located on the same floor. For men 
with children, the two stone buildings immediately adjacent to 
the Seminary on North Avenue are now available. In these build- 
ings, which have been completely remodeled Into apartment struc- 
tures, the Seminary provides housekeeping accommodations for 
nine families at a nominal rental. Prospective students may re- 
quest that their names be placed upon the waiting list for either 
type of apartment, by addressing the Secretary to the President. 

ROOMS FOR YOUNG WOMEN 
Suitable housing for young women in the Department of 
Christian Education will be provided by the Seminary. 

GROUP INSURANCE 
Unmarried students in the dormitory and married students 
occupying Seminary apartments are protected against personal 
loss by fire in the amount of $300 and $500 respectively. A 
premium of $1.50 per single student and $2.25 per married stu- 
dent covers the cost for three years. This Item is Included In the 
Entrance Deposit. 

THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF THE SEMINARY 
Adequate provision Is made for the maintenance and develop- 
ment of the religious life. In addition to the private devotions of 
the men, there are various gatherings for social worship. Daily 
Chapel services are held under the direction of the Faculty. A 
Seminary Communion Service is held in the Pressly Chapel soon 
after the opening of the session in the fall; and a similar service, 
especially for the Senior Class, is held during commencement week. 
The Day of Prayer for Educational Institutions is observed each 
year with appropriate exercises. "Family worship" Is conducted 
by the students daily after the evening meal, and members 
of the student body take their turn In leading Chapel devotions 
in connection with their Chapel preaching service. The local 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 57 



group of volunteers for the mission fields does much to keep 
alive and active the missionary spirit. 

During a recent year, the students, of their own volition and at 
their own expense, fitted up an attractive Worship Room in the 
building, as a place of quiet retirement for religious meditation, 
and where worship is held every week-night at 10 o'clock. 

THE SOCIAL LIFE OF THE SEMINARY 

A social hour under the auspices of the Women's Dormitory 
Committee follows the Chapel service on the opening day of the 
Seminary year. Soon after the opening of the session, the Student 
Association arranges a reception for the new students. This is 
usually held in one of the local churches. Other social affairs are 
held at the option of the students during the year. The different 
congregations of the city invite the students to come to their 
socials and share their hospitality. 

THE WEBSTER MEMORIAL FORUM 

The Webster Memorial Forum is a student organization 
which meets at stated times for the discussion of pre-arranged 
subjects. It usually has a speaker whose address is correlated 
with open discussion. The organization originated in a desire on 
the part of the students for a closer fellowship between the student 
body and the Faculty. Dr. John Hunter Webster, formerly Profes- 
sor of New Testament Language and Literature, was asked to 
sponsor this Forum. After his death in 1933, the organization 
called itself the "Webster Memorial Forum" in honor of the one 
who had given substantial help to the students in their Initial 
problems and discussions. 

MUSICAL OPPORTUNITY 

, The Praise Service of the Church has long been a profound 
Interest of the United Presbyterians. Pittsburgh is one of the 
major musical centers of America, having its own famed Symphony 
Orchestra, and such singing groups as the Mendelssohn Choir, 
the Bach Choir, and the Opera Society. Seminary students who 
can pass entrance tests have been singing In these organizations 
for many years. 



58 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



Varying with the numbers and gifts of students in attendance, 
there has been a Chorus of Seminary men who sing for their own 
pleasure and development and have presented programs to our 
local churches. 

A library of several hundred musical classics for male voices 
is available for singing groups. 



PHYSICAL CULTURE 

In the fall and spring, outdoor sports hold first place. The 
city tennis courts in the park, two minutes' walk from the Semi- 
nary may be used. The Seminary gymnasium provides additional 
opportunity for physical training. 

The Allegheny Y. M. C. A. is located beside the Seminary. 
With its splendid physical equipment, — gymnasium, bowling 
alleys, showers, and swimming pool, — it offers a fine opportunity 
to the men of the Seminary, all of whom have free membership 
in it. Provision is made for a variety of games. A physical 
examination is required of all who use the "Y" facilities. 



EXPENSES 

Rooms and accommodations provided by the Seminary, and 
the terms on which they are available, are discussed on pages 
55 and 56. Students who elect private lodgings must meet their 
own rental expenses. 

A dining room, located on the fifth floor of the dormitory, 
offers student board at cost. Although much of the equipment 
has been provided by the Seminary, the dining room is under the 
administration of the student body, and is practically self-sup- 
porting. With a view to the proper maintenance of equipment 
and its gradual replacement as that becomes necessary, the Club 
is accumulating a special fund, known as the sinking fund, to 
which each member contributes ^6.00 a year. A limited number 
of students receive their board in compensation for their services 
as waiters. Bills are rendered monthly. An initial deposit of 
^35.00 is required of each student to defray the bills of the first 
month. The Club operates five and one-half days of each week, 



Student Expenses 




$5.00 


Books & Sup. (est.) 


$ 75.00 


S.OO 


Board (est.) 


385.00 


5.00 


Laundry, etc. (est.) 


90.00 


5.00 


Local Car Fare (est.) 


50.00 


3.00 


Incidentals (est.) 


70.00 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 59 



the average cost for such a week being ^8.50 per member. The 
cost of food over the week ends is included in the estimate below. 
All men rooming in the building are required to take their meals 
in the Seminary dining hall. 

The Board of Christian Education of the United Presbyterian 
Church, through its retail department, the United Presbyterian 
Book Store, allows students a reduction of twenty per cent on all 
books. The Board also grants reasonable credit to students under 
presbyterial supervision, where they are unable to make imme- 
diate payment. 



*MatricuIation Fee 
*Entrance Deposit 
*Diploma Fee (Seniors) 
*Cap & Gown (Seniors) 

Student Association Fee 

(* Items starred are required only once; all others represent annual expenses). 

Self-Support and Student Aid 

Students are urged and encouraged to maintain a maximum 
degree of financial independence. Self-reliance, rather than the 
expectation of special favors, is held up as the norm throughout 
life for servants of the Church as well as other members of society. 
However, for those students who find it impossible to finance all 
of their Seminary course, a modest amount of aid is available. 

The Board of Education Aid 

The General Assembly authorizes the presbyteries to recom- 
mend worthy students for grants from the Board of Education. 
The maximum authorized for 1948-1949 was as follows: ^130 to 
students of the first year, $120 to second-year students, and $90 
to third-year students. These grants are made only to students 
who attend the United Presbyterian Seminary. 

Student Aid Fund 

There Is a limited fund at the disposal of the Seminary for the 
assistance of needy students. This fund Is provided for emergency 
cases only and is administered under the careful supervision of the 
Faculty. 



60 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theologiqal Seminary 



THE STUDENT ASSOCIATION 

The Student Association is the official organization of the 
student body. Its constitution states that the purpose of the 
Association shall be to promote the spirit of unity, self-govern- 
ment, social and spiritual welfare of the students, and to main- 
tain a sympathetic understanding and close cooperation with 
the Faculty. The Student Board, the governing agency of the 
Association, is composed of the President of the Eating Club, 
the Secretary of the Preaching Association, a representative 
from each class, and a member at large. Dues of ^3.00 a year 
are assessed to cover student activity. This association was form- 
ally organized in December, 1945. 



THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

All who have been enrolled as students of The Pittsburgh- 
Xenia Theological Seminary or its constituent institutions are en- 
titled to membership. The object of the Association is to cherish 
the memories of Seminary life, to maintain an active interest in 
Seminary aflfairs, and to promote the welfare of the Seminary and 
the Church. A business meeting, followed by a social hour and 
banquet, is held each year in connection with the Commencement 
Exercises. The business meeting is held in the First Church, 
North Side, Pittsburgh, at 4:00 P. M. of Commencement Day. At 
this time the Association elects officers to serve for the ensuing 
year. The business meeting is followed by a social hour culminat- 
ing in the Alumni Banquet at 5:30 P. M. Alumni and friends of 
the Seminary are urged to attend. 

All members are requested to send to the Seminary Library 
copies of such books, pamphlets and important magazine articles 
as they may have published. 

The officers of the Alumni Association are: the Rev. Charles 
W. Fulton, D.D., President; the Rev. James M. Guthrie, D.D., 
Vice-President; and the Rev. L. Roy Lash, D.D., Secretary- 
Treasurer. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



61 



*AWARDS GRANTED, 1947-1948 



Degree of Master of Theology 

Franklin Willis Harper ...... Greensburg, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1940 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1943 

Westmoreland Presbytery 

Wallace Gilchrist McGeoch ..... Leechburg, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1926 
Th.B., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1929 
Kiskiminetas Presbytery 

Howard Dewalt McMurray ...... Oil City, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1931 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1935 

Lake Presbytery 



Degree of Bachelor of Divinity 

Cletus Valentine Baker ..... 
A.B.,_Tarkio College, 1945 
Illinois Southern Presbytery 

Charles Raymond Graham . . . . . 

A.B., Sterling College, 1942 
Xenia Presbytery 

Warwick Wallace Hutchison . . . 

A.B., Westminster College, 1946 

Monongahela Presbytery 

*Kenneth Virgil Kettlewell (11/26/47) 
A.B., Muskingum College, 1945 
Muskingum Presbytery 

Earl Wilford Lighthall ..... 
A.B., Syracuse University, 1936 
Pittsburgh Conference, The Methodist Church 

Robert Hall Mayo ...... 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1942 
Allegheny Presbytery 

Frank William Montgomery .... 
A.B., Sterling College, 1940 
Kansas City Presbytery 

*Gerald Le Roy Selby (4/6/48) 

A.B., Sterling College, 1946 
Arkansas Valley Presbytery 

Ernest George Smith ..... 

A.B., Buena Vista College (la.), 1942 
Des Moines Presbytery 



Percy, 111. 



Columbus, Ohio 



Pittsburgh, Pa. 



New Concord, Ohio 



Murrysville, Pa. 



Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Topeka, Kansas 



Benkelman, Nebr. 



Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Except as otherwise indicated, degrees were granted May 13, 1948. 



62 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



Scholarships and Prizes 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship (not to exceed $800) to Mr. Robert Hall 
Mayo. 

The Jane Hogg Gardner Scholarship (not to exceed $200) to Mr. Frank 
William Montgomery. 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Award to Mr. Frank William Montgomery. 

Graduation Honors: Magna Cum Laude to Mr. Robert Hall Mayo and Mr. 
Frank William Montgomery. 

The James Purdy Scholarships (six in number, not to exceed $50 each) to the 
following Juniors: William Bikle Anderson, Mark Hilton Caldwell, Thomas 
Lewis Patton, Jr., Edward James Pitz, Clarence Leroy Thomas, and Edmond 
Irving Watkins. 



k 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 63 

REGISTER OF STUDENTS, 1948-1949 

*Senior Class 

Eugene Hoopes Ammon (B.D., 11/24/48) . . New Wilmington, Pa. 

B.S., Sterling College, 1941 
Mercer Presbytery 

Joseph Harold Anderson ....... Butler, Pa. 

B.B.A., Westminster College, 1946 
Butler Presbytery 

William Henry Anderson, Jr. ..... . Dover, N. J. 

A.B., Wheaton College, 1946 
New York Presbytery 

Russell Allen Arthur ....... Cambridge, Ohio 

B.Sc, Ohio State University, 1941 
Allegheny Presbytery 

Kenneth Lloyd Beams ....... Oneonta, N. Y. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1938 
Delaware Presbytery 

Gordon Earl Boak McDonald, Pa. 

B.S., Muskingum College, 1942 
Chartiers Presbytery 

Jay William Brewer ....... Washington, Iowa 

B.S., Sterling College, 1944 
Keokuk Presbytery 

WiLLARD Kyle George Youngstown, Ohio 

B.S., Westminster College, 1936 
Cleveland Presbytery 

Arsen Hachick Gulian Detroit, Mich. 

A.B., University of Dubuque, 1946 

Detroit Presbytery 

(Candidate for Degree, summer or fall, 1949) 

Francis Bruce Johnston (B.D., 11/24/48) . . New Wilmington, Pa. 
A.B., Westminster College, 1941 
Mercer Presbytery 

Robert Lee Lanning, Jr Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1942 
Monongahela Presbytery 

Harvey Milton Luce ....... Collyer, Kans. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1946 
Kansas City Presbytery 

James Gardiner McConnell .... New York 10, N. Y. 
A.B., Monmouth College, 1946 
Monongahela Presbytery 

Leonard Arden McCulloch ....... Geneva, Ohio 

B.S., Monmouth College, 1939 
Cleveland Presbytery 

James Foster Reese Harrodsburg, Ky. 

B.S., Knoxville College, 1946 

Tennessee Presbytery 
Paul Harvey Sutton Donora, Pa. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1946 

Detroit Presbytery 



64 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminafy 



WiLMER Neil Thornburg ....... McDonald, Pa. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1945 
Kansas City Presbytery 

Peter Van Lierop ........ Detroit, Mich. 

A.B.,_Hope College, 1946 
Detroit Presbytery 

Elmon Earl Ward ........ Romeo, Mich. 

A.B., Wheaton College, 1946 
Detroit Presbytery 

* Candidates for Degree of B.D., May 12, 1949, unless otherwise indicated. 



Middle Class 

William Bikle Anderson ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1947 
Cleveland Presbytery 

Mark Hilton Caldwell ........ Houston, Pa. 

B.S., Sterling College, 1947 
Chartiers Presbytery 

Kenneth George Carey ........ Lenox, Iowa 

A.B., Tarkio College, 1939 
College Springs Presbytery 

Robert Merwin Jones ....... Floral Park, N. Y. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1947 
New York Presbytery 

Fulton Clark Kissick ...... New Wilmington, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1940 
Mercer Presbytery 

Carl Howard Noble Wheeling, W. Va. 

A.B., West Liberty College, 1948 
Monongahela Presbytery 

Thomas Lewis Patton, Jr. ....... New Castle, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1941 
Mercer Presbytery 

Edward James Pitz ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1947 
Monongahela Presbytery 

Howard Eugene Rosebaugh ....... Mars, Pa. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1947 
Allegheny Presbytery 

James Ralston Shott ........ Oakmont, Pa, 

A.B., Westminster College, 1947 
Monongahela Presbytery 

Clarence Leroy Thomas ........ Akron, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1947 
Muskingum Presbytery 

Edmond Irving Watkins ...... Drayton Plains, Mich. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1947 
Detroit Presbytery 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



65 



The Junior Class 

James Arthur Adair ........ Sterling, Kans. 

A.B., Sterling College. 1948 
Arkansas Valley Presbytery 

Richard Waldo Braun Parkston, S. D. 

A.B., Dakota Wesleyan University, 1947 

The North American Baptist General Conference 

William Earl Butler St. Louis, Mo. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1948 
Illinois Southern Presbytery 

David Armstrong Campbell ....... Alliance, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1948 
Cleveland Presbytery 

Kenneth Howard Campbell ...... Monroe, Ohio 

A.B., Sterling College. 1948 
First Ohio Presbytery 

James Corry, Jr. ........ Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1948 
Monongahela Presbytery 

Wesley Edwin Covert ....... Grove City, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1948 

Erie Conference, The Methodist Church 

Robert Byron Crozier . Altoona, Pa. 

A.B.. Wheaton College, 1948 

Western Pa. Dist., Christian & Missionary Alliance 

Lloyd Allen Dalbey ....... Youngstown, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1948 
Cleveland Presbytery 

James Robert Deemer ....... McKees Rocks, Pa. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1948 
Monongahela Presbytery 

James Edwin Eddy Waterloo, Iowa 

Senior, Sterling College 
Cedar Rapids Presbytery 

Frank Abrams Erwin ....... Adena, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1948 
Steubenville Presbytery 

Donald William Ferguson Erie, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1949 
Beaver Valley Presbytery 

Edward Charles Fish ........ Elcho, Wis. 

B.S., Sterling College, 1948 

Wisconsin Conference, The Congregational Church 

Theodore William Kalsbeek Liberty, Ind. 

A.B., Earlham College, 1948 
First Ohio Presbytery 



66 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



Robert Lee Kelley, Jr. . . . . . . Mt. Lebanon, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1948 
Monongahela Presbytery 

Harold Edward Kurtz Nyssa, Ore. 

B.S., Monmouth College, 1948 
Idaho Presbytery 

John Graham Lorimer Beaver Falls, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1945 
Beaver Valley Presbytery 

James Charles Miller ....... Akron, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1948 
Cleveland Presbytery 

Dale Keith Milligan . . . . .• . . Des Moines, Iowa 
A.B., Monmouth College, 1948 
Des Moines Presbytery 

William Lester McClelland ...... New Castle, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1948 
Beaver Valley Presbytery 

James Gladstone Patterson ...... Walton, N. Y. 

B.S., Muskingum College, 1948 
Delaware Presbytery 

James Herbert Patterson ...... Chicago, 111. 

A.B., Wheaton College, 1948 
Wheeling Presbytery 

Ross Wilson Porter ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1948 
Monongahela Presbytery 

Aaron Leigh Powers . . . . . . . Des Moines, Iowa 

A.B., Drake University, 1948 
Des Moines Presbytery 

John Allen Shearer Akron, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1948 
Cleveland Presbytery 

Donald Earl Steeb . . . . ... . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1948 
Monongahela Presbytery 

John Kaufman Stoner ...... New Concord, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1948 
Muskingum Presbytery 

Louise Hannah Ward ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1947 
Pittsburgh Conference, The Methodist Church 

David Pollock White ....... Avalon, Pa. 

A.B., Bucknell University, 1948 
Allegheny Presbytery 

William Sherman Wilson Wichita, Kans. 

Senior, Sterling College 
Arkansas Valley Presbytery 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Thelological Seminary 67 



Part-time Students 

Jack Claude Carr ........ Des Moines, Iowa 

A.B., Sterling College, 1947 
Des Moines Presbytery 

John Carson Cogley Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Taylor University, 1946 

Pittsburgh Conference, The Methodist Church 

Harold Julius Larsen ....... Victor, Colo. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1948 
Arkansas Valley Presbytery 

Russell Roy Lester ....... Saxonburg, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1947 
Butler Presbytery 

Glen Dale Owens ........ Darlington, Pa. 

B.S. in B.A., Geneva College, 1942 
Beaver Valley Presbytery 

Murray Henry Russell Seattle, Wash. 

A.B., Seattle Pacific College, 1947 



Puget Sound Presbytery 

derick Stire Stewar 
Senior, Monmouth C 
Chicago Presbytery 



Frederick Stire Stewart . Oak Park, 111. 

Senior, Monmouth College 



GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Cletus V. Baker Connoquenessing, Pa. 

A.B., Tarkio College, 1945 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1948 

Butler Presbytery 

Robert Mason Barnes ........ Valencia, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1944 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1946 

Allegheny Presbytery 

James Hiram Blackwood ...... Mt. Lebanon, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1930 
■ Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1933 
Monongahela Presbytery 

Paul Robert Coleman ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1942 _ 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1945 

Monongahela Presbytery 

James Hugh Dean Fairpoint, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1941 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1944 

Wheeling Presbytery 

Milford Franklin Henkel, Jr. ..... Carmel, N. Y. 

M.A., Boston University, 1948 

B.D., Winona Lake School of Theology, 1948 

Conservative Baptist Association, No. Bapt. Convention 



68 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



George Loren Jones ...... McConnellsburg, Pa. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1943 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1946 

Conemaugh Presbytery 

Frederick Arland Huston ....... Etna, Pa. 

B.S., Kent State University, 1936 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1941 

Allegheny Presbytery 

George William Hutton Butler, Pa. 

A.B.. Muskingum College, 1924 

Th.B., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1928 

Butler Presbytery 

Thomas Johnston ........ McKeesport, P&. 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1942 

S.T.B., Westminster (Md.) Theological Seminary, 194S 

Pittsburgh Conference, The Methodist Church 

Richard Karl Kennedy ....... Vandergrift, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1941 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminarj^, 1944 

Kiskiminetas Presbytery 

Earl Wilford Lighthall New Florence, Pa. 

A.B., Syracuse University, 1936 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1948 

Pittsburgh Conference, The Methodist Church 

Frank William Montgomery St. ClairsvIUe, Ohio 

A.B., Sterling College, 1940 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1948 

Wheeling Presbytery 

John Leonard McCreight ...... Philadelphia, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1945 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1947 

Philadelphia Presbytery 

Ralph Newell Ellwood City, Pa. 

A.B., Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1943 
B.D., Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1948 
Beaver Association, Northern Baptist Convention 

William Montgomery Nichol, Jr. ..... Braddock, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1926 

Th.B., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1929 

Westmoreland Presbytery 

Albert Roy Ogborne Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1941 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1944 

Monongahela Presbytery 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



69 



STUDENTS IN CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 



Juniors 

Carolyn Ella Brewer . . . . 

B.Sc, Sterling College, 1945 
Keokuk Presbytery 

Gertrude Elizabeth Luce . . . . . 
B.S. in Ed., Ball State Teachers' College, 1946 
Monongahela Presbytery 

Mary Louise Lybrook ...... 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1940 
First Ohio Presbytery 



Washington, Iowa 
Bluffton, Ind. 
Camden, Ohio 



Seniors 

EvLYN Wehling Fulton ....... Bellevue, Pa. 

A.B., Pennsylvania College for Women, 1944 
Allegheny Presbytery 

Alice Ruth Gabel West Allis, Wis. 

A.B., University of Illinois, 1945 
Wisconsin Presbytery 

Jean Elda Snodgrass New Castle, Pa. 

B. Sc. in Ed., Muskingum College, 1944 
Beaver Valley Presbytery 

Edith Margasetta Vorhis ...... Coraopolis, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1946 
Monongahela Presbytery 



SUMMARY OF ATTENDANCE 

Undergraduate Department 

Juniors , 31 

Middlers 12 

Seniors . . 19 

Part-time ........... 7 

Graduate Department . 

Department of Christian Education 

Total Enrollment 



69 

17 

7 

93 



70 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



INSTITUTIONS REPRESENTED 



Ball State Teachers College, Indiana . 

Boston University, Massachusetts 

Bucknell University, Pennsylvania 

Dakota Wesleyan University, South Dakota 

Drake University, Iowa 

Earlham College, Indiana 

Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary, Penn 

Geneva College, Pennsylvania 

Grove City College, Pennsylvania 

Hope College, Michigan 

Kent State University, Ohio 

Knoxville College, Tennessee 

Monmouth College. Illinois 

Muskingum College, Ohio 

Ohio State University .... 

Pennsylvania College for Women 

Seattle Pacific College, Washington 

Sterling College, Kansas 

Syracuse University, New York . 

Tarkio College, Missouri . . . , 

Taylor University, Indiana 

University of Dubuque, Iowa 

University of Illinois .... 

University of Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania 

Waynesburg College, Pennsylvania 

West Liberty College, West Virginia 

Westminster College, Pennsylvania 

Wheaton College, Illinois 



ylvania 



*U 



16 



CE 
1 



69 



17 



LOCALITIES REPRESENTED 



Colorado 1 

Indiana .......... 1 

Illinois ........... 2 

Iowa ........... 6 

Kansas 3 

Kentucky .......... 1 

Michigan . 4 

Missouri ........... 1 

New Jersey .......... 1 

New York 4 

Ohio 11 

Pennsylvania .......... 29 

Oregon 1 

South Dakota ......... 1 

Washington .......... 1 

West Virginia ......... 1 

Wisconsin .......... 1 

69 
(*U — Undergraduate; G— Graduate; CE— Christian Education) 



1 

2 
14 



17 



CE 

1 
1 



93 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 71 

SPECIAL LECTURES, 1948-1949 

In the Pressly Qiapel 

The Reverend A. H. Baldinger, D.D., Moderator of the General Assembly 
"The Message of Melwood Church" 

The Reverend A. J. Elliott, D.D. 

"Evangelism" — 2 lectures 

The Reverend Robert W. Gibson, D.D., and Office Staff 
"How to Put the Youth Program into Effect" 

The Reverend Edward E. Grice, D.D. 

"The Present Conditions in Our Mission Fields" 

Paul Harrison, M.D. 

"The Challenge of Islam" 

Mrs. J. M. Heagan 

"The Organization and Work of the W. G. M. S." 

The Reverend Elmer G. Homrighausen, Th.D., D.D. 
"The Basis of Evangelism" 
"The Nature of Evangelism" 

The Reverend Charles L. Hussey, D.D. 

"The U. P. Plan of Pensions and Ministerial Relief" 

The Reverend Albert E. Kelly, D.D. 

"The Evangelistic Program of the Church" 

The Reverend Carl J. Kissling 

"The National Youth Project, — the Story of Blind Gidada" 

The Reverend William G. Mather, Ph.D. 

"The Present Challenge to the Rural Church" 

The Reverend J. Reed Miller, D.D. 
"Prayer and the Human Dilemma" 

The Reverend Ansley C. Moore, D.D. 

"The Solitariness of Christ" — a Sacramental Address 

The Reverend John E. Simpson, D.D. 
"Christ Alone" 

The Reverend A. K. Stewart, D.D. 

"American Missions, the New Imperative" 

The Reverend T. M. Taylor, D.D. 

"The World Council of Churches" — 2 lectures 

The Venerable William S. Thomas, Jr., D.D. 

'What is the Ministry?" 

Chaplain H. Park Tucker 
"The Making of a Man" 



72 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



At the Webster Memorial Forum 

Mr. James H, Dale 

'■The Y.M.C.A., Yesterday and Today" 

The Reverend Elmer G. Homrighausen, Th.D., D.D. 
"Evangelism" 

The Reverend Orville L. Kuhn, Ed.M. 
"Remove the Blindfold" 

Mr. Howard L. Ralston, Mus.B., A.A.G.O. 
"The Minister and the Music" 

The Reverend Charles G. Skuce, Ed.M. 

"The Union College Character Research Project" 

The Reverend Cary N. Weisiger III 

"What Has Helped Me Most in the Ministry" 



HISTORICAL ROLL OF PROFESSORS 

Place of Period of 

Inauguration Service 

Service 1794-1819 

Philadelphia 1820-1826 

Canonsburg 1821-1842 

Pittsburgh 1825-1829 

Pittsburgh 1829-1831 

Allegheny 1832-1870 

Canonsburg 1834-1834 

Canonsburg 1835-1871 

Allegheny 1835-1836 

Oxford 1839-1855 

Oxford 1839-1840 

Canonsburg 1842-1846 

Allegheny 1843-1846 

Canonsburg 1847-1855 

Allegheny 1847-1884 

Allegheny 1851-1887 

Xenia 1855-1875 

Oxford 1855-1858 

Oxford 1855-1874 

Monmouth 1858-1874 

Xenia 1858-1873 

Mbnmouth 1864-1874 

Monmouth 1867-1870 

Xenia 1883-1883 

Allegheny 1871-1886 

Xenia 1871-1880 

Xenia 1873-1888 

Xenia 1873-1914 

Xenia 1873-1878 

Allegheny 1876-1891 

Xenia 1879-1899 

Xenia 1884-1902 

Allegheny 1885-1921 

Allegheny 1886-1909 

Allegheny 1886-1943 

Xenia 1889-1894 

Allegheny 1888-1892 

Allegheny 1893-1915 

Xenia 1895-1905 

Xenia 1899-1921 

Xenia 1903-1930 

Xenia 1905-1923 

Allegheny 1907-1940 

Allegheny 1907-1914 

Xenia 1908-1933 

Xenia 1914-1930 

Pittsburgh 1914-1929 

Pittsburgh 1915-1931 

Pittsburgh 1920-1926 

Pittsburgh 1922-1926 

St. Louis 1922- 

St. Louis 1923- 

St. Louis 1924-1946 

Pittsburgh 1926-1930 

Pittsburgh 1931-1947 

Pittsburgh 1932- 

Plttsburgh 1942- 

Pittsburgh 1942- 

Pittsburgh 1946- 

Pittsburgh 1947- 

Pittsburgh 1947- 

Pittsburgh 1949- 



JoHN Anderson 

John Banks 

James Ramsey 

Joseph Kerr 

MuNGO Dick 

John Taylor Pressly 

David Carson 

Thomas Beveridge 

Moses Kerr . 

Joseph Claybaugh 

Samuel W. McCracken 

James Martin 

James Lemonte Dinwiddie 

Abraham Anderson 

Alexander Downs Clark 

David Reynolds Kerr . 

Samuel Wilson 

William Davidson 

Alexander Young . 

John Scott . 

Joseph Clokey 

Andrew Morrow Black 

David Alexander Wallace 

David Alexander Wallace 

Joseph Tate Cooper 

William Bruce 

James Gillespie Carson 

William Gallogly Moorehead 

[ackson Burgess McMichael 

Alexander Young . 

James Harper 

David MacDill 

David A. McClenahan 

James Alexander Grier 

John McNaugher 

WiLBERT Webster White 

Oliver Joseph Thatcher 

John A. Wilson . 

John Douds Irons . 

Joseph Kyle 

Jesse Johnson 

John Elliott Wishart . 

William Riley Wilson . 

Charles Frederick Wishart 

John Hunter Webster . 

Melvin Grove Kyle 

James Doig Rankin 

David Frazier McGill . 

James Gallaway Hunt 

James Harper Grier 

Robert McNary Karr . 

James Leon Kelso 

George Boone McCreary 

Robert Nathaniel Montgomery 

Albert Henry Baldinger 

Clarence Joseph Williamson 

George Anderson Long 

Theophilus Mills Taylor 

Addison Hardie Leitch 

H. Ray Shear 

Florence M. Lewis 

Gordon Edmund Jackson 



74 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary. 



DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS 

The provision of modern theological education without charge 
to students requires an extensive outlay on the part of the Semi- 
nary. The maintenance of the Seminary building and equipment 
is but one item in the annual draft upon the treasury. At the 
present time the income from endowment is quite insufficient to 
meet current expenses. 

The claims of the Seminary are, therefore, submitted to the 
consideration of all who wish to honor the Lord with their sub- 
stance. Congregations, as well as individuals, are asked to give 
their help to the institution. Appeal is also made to all who pur- 
pose making bequests to remember the Seminary, for the training 
of the ministry is the primary educational task of the Church. 

All bequests should be drawn as follows: 
For Personal Property 

I hereby give and bequeath to The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theo- 
logical Seminary of the United Presbyterian Church of North 

America, the sum of dollars to 

constitute a part of the permanent funds of the institution. 

For Real Estate 

I hereby give and devise to The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological 
Seminary of the United Presbyterian Church of North America, 
its successors and assigns, forever, all that lot or piece of ground 
^carefully describing the property), the same to hold or dispose 
of for the benefit of the permanent funds of the institution. 

Bequests may also be made for special funds, scholarships, or 
lectures. 

Care should be taken to use the corporate name as given 
above, and to have the bequest conform to the laws of the State 
governing it. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 75 



CORRESPONDENCE 

In general, correspondence should be addressed to the Pres- 
ident of the Faculty, the Rev. George A. Long, D.D., 616 West 

North Avenue, Pittsburgh 12, Pa. 

Letters relating to the endowment and funds should be ad- 
dressed to Mr. M. J. Hein, Treasurer, using the Seminary address 
given above. 

All letters concerning registration and admission to the Sem- 
inary should be sent to the Registrar's Office. Likewise, all re- 
quests for transcripts of record shotdd be addressed to the Regis- 
trar in properly written form, — giving the full name of the appli- 
cant, his present address, the place and period of attendance, and 
the nam.e and address of the institution and official to whom the 
transcript is to he sent. The request shoidd be accompanied by 
the usual fee of one dollar ($1.00), unless the transcript is the ap- 
plicant's first, or is to be used in connection luith an application 
for a Chaplaincy in the Armed Forces of the United States. 



76 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary. 



INDEX 

Academic Regulations ....... 15,39,44 

Accreditation of the Seminary ..... 6 

Admission, Terms of ...... . 15,39,44 

Alumni Association ........ 60 

Attendance, Summary of ...... . 69-70 

Awards Granted, 1947-1948 61 

Bible Lands Museum ....... 52 

Board of Advisors, Dept. of Christian Education . . 9 

Board of Directors ........ 7 

Board of Trustees ........ 9 

Calendar for 1949 and 1950 4 

Calendar of the Seminary ....... 5 

Chapel Preaching ........ 37 

Christian Education, Department of ... . 43-50 

Classification of Students ....... 16,44 

Control and Management of the Seminary ... 6 

Correspondence ........ 75 

Courses of Instruction, Undergraduate Department . . 23-38 

Courses Available to Graduate Students .... 22,39 

Courses of Instruction, Department of Christian Education 47-50 

Credentials Required for Admission .... 15,39,44 

Cultural Advantages of the Seminary .... S3 

Curriculum in Outline, Undergraduate Department . . 21 

Curriculum in Outline, Department of Christian Education 46 

Degrees Granted, 1947-1948 61 

Degree of Bachelor of Divinity ...... 18 

Degree of Master of Theology ...... 39 

Degree of Master of Religious Education .... 45 

Denominational Seminary, Advantages of ... . S3 

Dining Club - 58 

Donations and Bequests ....... 74 

Dormitory, Women's Committee ..... 9 

Elective Courses ........ 22 

Emeritus Professors ........ 10 

Examinations ......... 18 

Facilities for Study ........ 51 

Faculty - 10 

Fees and Other Expenses 40,45,58,59 

Field Work 37,44 

Graduate Studies, Department of . . . ... 39-41 

Graduation, Requirements and Awards 18,39,45 

Historical Roll of Professors 73 

Honors, Cum Laude Series ....... 18 

Institutions and Localities Represented .... 70 

Insurance for Students ....... 56 

Library and Reading Room . SI 

Life at the Seminary ........ SS 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary. 77 



Location of the Seminary Building 55 

Musical Opportunity 57 

Observatory, The Allegheny ....... 54 

Physical Culture 58 

Planetarium, The Buhl Foundation ..... 54 

Pre-Seminary Studies ........ 13 

Pre-Theological Major ....... 14 

Prizes Awarded, 1948 62 

Purpose of the Seminary ....... 12 

Register of Students, 1948-1949 63-70 

Registration 15,17 

Religious Life at the Seminary 56 

Rooms and Accommodations ...... 55-56 

Schedule, The Norm and Modifications .... 17 

Scholarships, Competitive ....... 19 

Self-support and Student Aid ...... 59 

Social Life at the Seminary ...... 57 

Special Lectures, 1948-1949 71 

Student Association '60 

Students, Register of, 1948-1949 63-70 

Summer Institutes 41 

Term and Course, Prescribed by General Assembly . . 12 

Undergraduate Department ...... 12-38 

University of Pittsburgh, Affiliation with .... 42 

Webster Memorial Forum 57 

Women's Dormitory Committee ...... 9 

Y. M. C. A., Allegheny Branch 58 




THE 

PITTSBURGH-XENIA 

THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Founded 1794 




ANNUAL CATALOGUE 
1949-1950 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 
1950-1951 



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THE 
ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

OF THE 

Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Theological Seminary 

OF 

THE UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 
OF NORTH AMERICA 

616 West North Avenue 
PITTSBURGH 12, PA. 

1949-1950 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
FOR THE YEAR 

1950-1951 



• CALENDAR FOR 19S0 • 


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THE SEMINARY CALENDAR 
1949 
1950 

26 May-31 Aug. Summer Session in Practical Theology for stu- 
dents previously" qualified in this Seminary. 



Fall Term 

12 Sept. Registration of new students, 1:00 P.M.-5:00 P.M. 

13 Sept. Registration of all Middlers and Seniors, 

9:00 A.M.-12 Noon. 

13 Sept. Formal Opening of the Session 

Opening Address in Pressly Chapel, 2:00 P.M. 
Reception to new students, 3:00 P.M. 

14 Sept. Class work begins, 8:30 A.M. 

22 Sept. Seminary Communion Service, 7:00 P.M. 
Sacramental Address by 

The Reverend Cary N. Weisiger, III. 

29 Nov. Last Day of the Fall Term 

30 Nov. Thanksgiving Day 



Winter Term 
5 Dec. Class work begins, 8:30 A.M. 
22 Dec. Christmas Vacation begins, after regular class hours 

1951 

2 Jan. Class work resumes, 8:30 A.M. 

7 Feb. Day of Prayer for Colleges and Seminaries 

Address by M. Earle Collins, Ph.D. 

President of Tarkio College. 
28 Feb. Last Day of the Winter term 



Spring Term 
1 Mar. Class Work begins, 8:30 A.M. 
22 Mar. Easter Recess begins, after regular class hours 
27 Mar. Class work resumes, 8:30 A.M. 
13 May Senior Communion Service, 4:00 P.M. 

The Pressly Chapel 

Professor Gordon E. Jackson officiating. 
13 May Baccalaureate Service, 8:00 P.M. 

The Beverly Heights U. P. Church. 

Sermon by Professor John H, Gerstner, Ph.D. 
16 May Annual Meeting of the Board of Directors, 2:00 P.M. 

16 May Senior Reception, — the Board of Directors, 7:00 P.M. 

17 May Annual Meeting of the Alumni Association, 4:00 P.M. 
17 May Alumni Dinner, 5:30 P.M. 

17 May Graduating Exercises, 8:00 P.M. 

-'"'^ The First Church, North Side, Pittsburgh 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



THE CONTROL AND MANAGEMENT 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary is the result of a 
union of the Pittsburgh and Xenia Seminaries consummated in 
1930, According to its proper ancestry the Xenia Seminary was 
founded in 1794 by the Associate Presbyterian Church. The 
Pittsburgh Seminary was founded in 1825 under the auspices of 
the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church. The Seminary as 
now established is under the immediate control of the American 
Synods of the United Presbyterian Church and the ultimate review 
control of the General Assembly. Its management is committed to 
a Board of Directors and Trustees, The Board of Directors consists 
of thirty-five members, ministers or ruling elders, who are nom- 
inated by the several Synods to the General Assembly for elec- 
tion on the basis of each Synod having one representative for 
every five thousand church members or a major fraction thereof. 
Each Synod has at least one representative. The Board of 
Directors has the general government of the Seminary, subject 
to the authority of the Synods and the General Assembly, appoints 
the Trustees, and provides for the financial maintenance of the 
institution. The Board of Trustees consists of twelve members. 
It is the corporate body which holds and manages the real estate 
and the funds of the Seminary. The term and the course of 
study are determined by the General Assembly. 



ACCREDITATION OF THE SEMINARY 

The Seminary is an accredited member of the American 
Association of Theological Schools, and has had this standing 
from the time of the adoption of the Association's accrediting 
system in 1938. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



The Rev. Roy E. Grace, Th.M., D.D. . 
The Rev. James M. Guthrie, D.D. 
The Rev. J. M. Findley Brown, D.D. 
The Rev. Lee E. Walker, D.D. 
The Rev. J. Kenneth Miller, M.A., D.D 



Synod of New York 

Term 
Expires 
. Upper Darby, Pa. 1950 
Floral Park, L. I., N. Y. 1950 
. Walton, N. Y. 1951 
Philadelphia, Pa. 1951 
Garden City, N. Y. 1952 



Synod of Pittsburgh 

The Rev. Paul M. Gillis, Th.M., Ph.D. 
The Rev. H. H. McConnell, Th.M., D.D. 
The Rev. James T. Vorhis, Th.M., D.D. . 
G. Ashton Brownlee, Esq. .... 

Mr. C. a. Colgate 

The Rev. R. W. Gibson, D.D. 

Mr. Frank H. Davis 

The Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, Th.M., D.D. . 



Pittsburgh, Pa. 1950 

New York, N. Y. 1950 

Coraopolis, Pa. 1950 

Washington, Pa. 1951 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 1951 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 1951 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 1952 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 1952 



First Synod of the West 



The Rev. Walker S. Brownlee 

The Rev. W. Scott McMunn, D.D. . 

The Rev. Howard D. McMurray . 

Mr. Albert B. McClester 

The Rev. Robert P. MacDonald 

The Rev. Wm. F. Rotzler, D.D. 

Arthur B. McBride, Esq. . 

The Rev, Livingstone A. Gordon 

The Rev. Don P. Montgomery, D.D. 



Hamburg, N. Y. 1950 

Butler, Pa. 1950 

. Oil City, Pa. 1950 

Butler, Pa. 1951 

New Wilmington, Pa. 1951 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 1951 

Sewickley, Pa. 1952 

Erie, Pa. 1952 

Youngstown, Ohio 1952 



Synod of Ohio 

The Rev. J. L. McCreight, Ph.D., D.D. 

The Rev. Alex. S. Fleming 

The Rev. Frank J. Irvine .... 



New Concord, Ohio 1950 
Steuben ville, Ohio 1951 
Dearborn, Mich. 1952 



Second Synod 

The Rev. Daniel C. Campbell, D.D. 
The Rev. J. W. Bickett, D.D. . 



Monroe, Ohio 1951 
Clifton, Ohio 1951 



Synod of Illinois 



The Rev. J. P. Lytle, D.D. 
The Rev. J. E. Simpson, D.D. 



West Allls, Wis. 
Oak Park, III. 



1951 
1951 



8 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 

Synod of Iowa |f^^, 

The Rev. Wallace N. Jamison .... Indianola, Iowa 1951 
The Rev. William B. Gamble Clarion, Iowa 1952 

Synod of the Plains 

The Rev. James L. Cottrell ..... Tulsa, Okla. 1951 

Synod of Nebraska 

The Rev. Roy P. Morris Murray, Nebr. 1951 

Synod of California 

The Rev. Carl S. Dunn, D.D. . . . Los Angeles, Calif. 1951 

Synod of the Columbia 

The Rev. J. Boyd Patterson, D.D Portland, Ore. 1950 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

The Rev. John E. Simpson, D.D., President 
The Rev. Walker S. Brownlee, Vice President 
The Rev. James T. Vorhis, Th.M., D.D., Secretary 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

The Executive Committee 

The Rev. W. F. Rotzler, D.D., Chairman 

The Rev. James T. Vorhis, Th.M., D.D., Secretary 

The Rev. R. W. Gibson, D.D. 

Mr. Frank H. Davis 

Mr. Albert B. McClester 

The Rev. Don P. Montgomery, D.D. 

The Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, Th.M., D.D. 

The Committee on Beneficiary Funds 

The Seminary Faculty 



HONORARY DIRECTORS 

The Rev. J. Walter Liggitt, D.D. 

The Rev. W. E. McCulloch, D.D. 

The Rev. T. N. McQuoro, D.D. 

The Rev. W. L. C. Samson, D.D. 

The Rev. J. A. Thompson, D.D., LL.D., L.H.D. 

The Rev. S. C. Gamble, D.D. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES T^rm 

Expires 

Robert Fisher, Esq Indiana, Pa. 1950 

Mr. T. J. Gillespie, Jr Pittsburgh, Pa. 1950 

J. M. Lashly, Esq., LL.D St. Louis, Mo. 1950 

The Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, Tii.M., D.D. . Pittsburgh, Pa. 1950 

The Rev. E. A. Daum, D.D Valencia, Pa. 1951 

Mr. John 0. Gilmore Pittsburgh, Pa. 1951 

George M. Swan, Esq Pittsburgh, Pa. 1951 

Mr. Frank H. Davis Pittsburgh, Pa. 1952 

Mr. Milton J. Hein Pittsburgh, Pa. 1952 

Mr. E. Bruce Hill Pittsburgh, Pa. 1952 

The Rev. James T. Vorhis, Th.M., D.D. . . Coraopolis, Pa. 1952 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

The Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, Th.M., D.D., President 

George M. Swan, Esq., Vice President 

Mr. M. J. Hein, Secretary 

Miss Mildred E. Cowan, Treasurer 

STANDING COMMITTEES 
The Committee on Finance The Committee on Seminary Premises 

The Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D., Mr. Frank H. Davis, 

Chairman Chairman 

Mr. Frank H. Davis Mr. John 0. Gilmore 

Mr. T. J. Gillespie, Jr. 

The Purchasing Committee 

The Rev. George A. Long, D.D. 



DORMITORY COMMITTEE 
Miss Eleanor Gillespie Mrs. W. H. Ochiltree 

Miss Alicte Gray Mrs. Chalmers T. Siviter 

Mrs. J. L. Kelso Mrs. A. H. Trimble 



THE BOARD OF ADVISORS 

OF THE 

DEPARTMENT OF CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

The Rev. Wm. F. Rot^ler, D.D., Chairman 

The Rev. James T. Vorhis, Th.M., D.D., Secretary 

The Rev. Robert W. Gibson, D.D. 

Mr. Frank H. Davis 

Mr. Albert B. McClester 

The Rev. Don P. Montgomery, D.D. 

The Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, Th.M., D.D. 

Mrs. H. Ray Shear 

Mrs. Thomas R. Sarver 

Miss Edith L. McBane 

The Rev. A. K. Stewart, D.D. 

The Rev. Glenn P. Reed, D.D. 

The Rev. Charles L. Hussey, D.D. 

The Rev. Albert E. Kelly, D.D. 



10 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



THE FACULTY 



The Rev. George Anderson Long, D.D., President - 
Professor of English Bible 

The Rev. James Leon Kelso, Th.D., D.D. 

Professor of Semitics and Biblical Archaeology 

The Rev. Clarence Joseph Williamson, D.D., Secretary 
Professor of Church History and Government 

The Rev. Theophilus Mills Taylor, D.D. 

Professor, the John McNaugher Chair 

of New Testament Literature and Exegesis 

The Rev. Addison Hardie Leitch, Ph.D., D.D. 

Dean and Professor of Systematic and Biblical Theology 

Miss Florence M. Lewis, M.A., Dean of Women 
Associate Professor of Christian Education 

The Rev. H. Ray Shear, M.A., D.D. 
Professor of Practical Theology 

The Rev. Gordon Edmund Jackson, Th.M. 

Professor of Philosophy of Religion and Religious Education 

The Rev. John H. Gerstner, Ph.D. 

Professor elect, Church History and Government 

Professor Donald L. Barbe, M.A. 
Instructor in Public Speaking 

The Rev. Paul R. Graham 

Instructor in New Testament Greek 

Mr. Howard L. Ralston, Mus.B., A.A.G.O. 
Instructor in Church Music 



EMERITUS PROFESSORS 

The Rev. Jesse Johnson, D.D., LL.D. 
Emeritus Professor of Church History 
Reynoldsburg, Ohio 

The Rev. George Boone McCreary, Ph.D., D.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Philosophy of Religion and Religious Education 
777 Berkeley Place, Claremont, Calif. 

The Rev. Albert Henry Baldinger, D.D. 
Emeritus Professor of Practical Theology 
Fowler, California 

The Rev. Robert Mc'Nary Karr, D.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Systematic and Biblical Theology 
Pawnee City, Nebraska 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 11 



OFFICERS OF THE FACULTY 

The Rev. George Anderson Long, D.D. 
President 

The Rev. Addison Hardie Leitch, Ph.D., D.D. 
Dean 

The Rev. Clarence Joseph Williamson, D.D. 
Secretary 

Miss Florence M. Lewis, M.A. 
Dean of Women 

Miss Evlyn Wehling Fulton, M.R.E. 
Registrar and Secretary to the Faculty 



COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

The Credentials Committee 

Dr. Leitch Prof. Jackson 

The Culriculum Committee 

The Faculty 

The Library Committee 

Dr. Taylor Dr. Kelso Prof. Jackson 

The Devotional Committee 

Dr. Williamson Dr. Shear Dr. Gerstner 

The Committee on Field Work and Placement 

Dr. Shear Miss Levs^is 

The Publicity Committee 

Dr. Jackson Dr. Kelso 

The Catalogue Committee 

Dr. Leitch Dr. Taylor Miss Lewis 

Graduate Studies Committee 

Dr. Taylor Dr. Leitch Dr. Kelso 



Miss Mildred E. Cowan 

Secretary to the President 

Mrs. W. Robert Caldwell, A.B. 
Acting Librarian 



12 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



THE PURPOSE OF THE SEMINARY 



The purpose of the Seminary, as defined in the Constitution, 
is to instruct candidates for the gospel ministry, ordained ministers 
of the gospel, and such as may be preparing for other special lines 
of Christian service, in the knowledge of the doctrines of the 
Scriptures and the order and institutes of worship taught therein 
and summarily exhibited in the standards of the United Presbyte- 
rian Church of North America; to cherish in them the life of 
true godliness, and to cultivate the gifts which Christ, the Head 
of the Church, confers on those whom He calls and ordains to the 
ministry, to the end that there may be raised up a succession of 
able, faithful, and godly ministers of the gospel and of other 
Christian workers. 



THE UNDERGRADUATE DEPARTMENT 



THE TERM AND COURSE OF STUDY 



The regular course of ministerial training prescribed by the 
General Assembly covers a period of three academic years, each of 
which is divided into three terms. The annual session begins the 
second Wednesday of September, and continues thirty-five weeks 
including holidays. 

The Seminary course is built for college graduates, and 
presupposes a foundation of broad and liberal culture. In 
preparation for their professional training in the Seminary, college 
students should take substantial courses in the subjects indicated 
in the following recommended Pre-Seminary Studies. 



JAMES DOIG RANKIN, D.D., LL.D. 

July 14, 1855 — September 22, 1949 



James Doig Rankin was Professor of Systematic and Biblical 
Theology in Pittsburgh Theological Seminary (one of the ancestors 
of Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary) from 1914 to 1930. He 
was born in Robinson, Illinois, the son of Rev. A. R. Rankin 
and Viana De Groffe Rankin, July 14, 1855. A goodly heritage 
was his. Not only his father, but five uncles were ministers of 
the Gospel. After graduating from Westminster College in 1882 
he entered Allegheny Theological Seminary, graduating in 1885. 
He was ordained and installed that same year as pastor of the First 
Church, Denver, Colorado, and continued in that work until 1910 
when he resigned to accept the pastorate of the First Church, 
Wilkinsburg, Pa., from which pastorate he came to the seminary. 
He was granted the degree of Doctor of Divinity by Monmouth 
College in 1894 and the degree of Doctor of Laws by Tarkio College 
in 1929. Following his professorship in the seminary he was pastor 
of the Pasadena Church, California, until 1937. 

Dr. Rankin's interests were not confined to the walls of his class 
room, nor to his own pastorates. He gave himself freely to the 
service of his Master in the United Presbyterian Church and in all 
the work of the Kingdom. He was Moderator of the General 
Assembly in 1910, was an associate editor of The United Presby- 
terian from 1918 until the time of his death; was a member and 
president of the Board of Freedmen's Missions, member of the 
Board of Home Missions and of its Evangelistic Committee. He 
was active in civic and reform work: chairman of the Committee 
on Good Government in Denver, Colorado, for five years; president 
of the Anti-Saloon League of Colorado for twelve years, and chap- 
lain of the Senate of Colorado, 1908-1910. 

During his 64 years of service he was unfalteringly faithful to 
every task assigned to him. He was an unusually gifted preacher, 
a beloved teacher, a thoughtful writer, a friend of man, a fellow- 
worker with God. His influence can not be measured. All who 
came in contact with him bear testimony to his glowing faith, his 
devout heart, his clear and stirring unfolding of Christian doctrine 
and his rich personality. 




James Doig Rankin, D.D., LL.D. 



i 



I 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 13 



PRE-SEMINARY STUDIES 

The American Association of Theological Schools, at its 
twelfth biennial meeting, Lexington, Ky., June, 1940, adopted a 
Statement regarding Pre-Seminary Studies and authorized it to be 
sent to all colleges and universities in the United States and 
Canada. In its present form, the statement includes the follow- 
ing specifications as to the proper fields of study and the minimum 
number of semester hours: 

Semester 
Fields Hours 

English (Literature, Composition and Speech) _ 12'16 

Bible or Religion „ _ _ 4'6 

Philosophy (At least two of the following: Introduction to philosophy. 
History of philosophy. Ethics, Logic) - 6' 12 

History ....„ 6-12 

A foreign language (At least one of the following: Latin, Greek, 
Hebrew, French, German) 12'16 

Natural sciences (Physical or biological) ^ .^ 4'6 

Social sciences (At least two of the following: Economics, Sociology, 
Government or pohtical science. Social psychology. Education) 4'6 

Concentration of work or 'majoring', is a common practice in colleges. For 
such concentration or major, a constructive sequence based upon any one, 
two, or three of the above fields of study would lead up naturally to a 
theological course. 

With the addition of a substantial course in Speech, and of 
12-16 semester hours in Elementary Greek, the emphasis being laid 
upon vocabulary, grammar and syntax, the Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Seminary has endorsed the foregoing Statement of Pre-Seminary 
Studies, and urges all college students who are looking forward 
to the Gospel ministry to make use of this Statement in tne 
shaping of their college course (in consultation with their advisors 
at college), so that they may not only secure the desired college 
degree but at the same time secure the best possible preparation 
for seminary work. 

The Statement of Pre-Seminary Studies does not purport to 
be in itself a complete four-year college course, but rather calls 
attention to those fields and courses of study which are accessible 
to all college students and which are of basic importance in 
preparation for seminary training. 



14 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 

The Statement is not yet mandatory, but it indicates the 
trend in seminary circles. The Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary will 
use this Pre-Seminary Statement of Studies as a standard by 
which to judge the preparedness of applicants for admission. 

Those who have notable deficiencies, especially in Philosophy 
and Greek, will be required to remove them. All new registrants 
will be required to take a placement examination in New Testa- 
ment Greek, regardless of the amount of collegiate Greek credits 
presented for entrance. This placement examination is based 
upon the vocabulary of the Johannine literature and the grammar 
covered in Machen's New Testament Greek for Beginners. Those 
failing to pass the examination with a minimum grade of 75 will 
be placed in appropriate classes in Elementary Greek which are 
offered for the convenience of those who are partially or totally 
deficient in Greek. Adequate preparation is prerequisite to New 
Testament Exegesis. 

PRE-THEOLOGICAL MAJOR 

Students in Colleges of Agriculture, who have it in mind to 
prepare for ministering to rural churches, may not find it entirely 
practicable to follow the Pre-Seminary Studies outlined above. 
In such case, and with a view to the most effective rural ministry, 
we recommend that in their college days they follow the Pre- 
Theological Major suggested by the Conference on Relation- 
ships between Colleges of Agriculture and Theological Seminaries, 
held at Purdue University, Nov. 6, 1940. The suggested Pre- 
Theological Major is as follows: 

"At least one basic course (three semester hours) in each of the following 
fields: 

Agricultural Economics 

Economics 

English Composition, 2 courses (6 semester hours) 

English Literature (preferably 2 courses) 

History or Government (preferably 2 courses) 

Philosophy 

Public Speaking 

Psychology 

Rural Sociology 

Sociology 

"In addition the student would fulfill the minimum requirements of the 
College of Agriculture, which include Science (usually Biology and Chemistry). 

"Recommended Electives : 
Education 
Foreign Language 

"Undergraduate courses in religion are not required in the suggested major, 
as these cannot be offered in state-supported institutions." 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 15 



ADMISSION 

Registration for the Fall Term, Tuesday, September 12, 1950, 
is set aside for the registration of all new students. Wednesday 
morning is reserved for the registration of all regular students 
in the Middle and Senior classes. Students having any irregulari- 
ties in their standing or schedule should in every case arrange 
to be seen by special appointment. It is important that students 
come for registration at the times designated. In case of late 
registration, a fee of one dollar a day is required, up to a maximum 
of five dollars, and the period during which late registration Is 
permitted Is limited to ten days from the beginning of each quarter. 

Admission. The normal time to enter the Seminary is at the 
opening of the annual session in September. The regular program 
of training begins at this time, and exhibits the maximum values 
when taken In proper educational sequence. Application for ad- 
mission should be made well In advance, on the official form, 
which may be secured from the Registrar's office; and should be 
followed promptly by the credentials mentioned below. 

Credentials. Every applicant for admission to the Seminary 
must present satisfactory credentials of his suitableness as a can- 
didate for the ministry or other contemplated form of Christian 
service. These credentials include: 1) A Letter of Introduction 
from his Pastor or Session testifying to his Christian character, 
active church membership, and general fitness for the ministry; 

2) A Letter from the Clerk of his Presbytery, or corresponding 
church officer, Indicating his official acceptance as a candidate 
for the ministry and his recommendation as a student of theology; 

3) A complete official Transcript of his Academic Credits, begin- 
ning with his high school record unless the applicant has com- 
pleted two or more years of college work; (the degree of A.B,, or 
an equivalent degree, from an accredited college or university is 
required for admission) ; 4) Satisfactory Testimonials from at 
least three personal references, as Indicated on the application 
blank. 

Declaration of Purpose. Before being admitted to the privi- 
leges of the Seminary, every student shall, in the presence of the 
Registrar, subscribe a declaration to the effect that while he is a 
student in the Seminary he will regularly, punctually, and diligently 



16 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



attend upon all the instructions of the professors, that he will 
promptly comply with the lawful requisitions of the Faculty and 
be subject to their authority, that he will honestly conform to all 
regulations of the Seminary, and that he will not propagate any 
opinions in opposition to the standards of the United Presbyterian 
Church. 

Entrance Deposit. From the moment of entrance, students are 
regarded as stewards of the Church's property, having special 
responsibility in connection with the free use of library and dormi- 
tory equipment. Each student, upon matriculation, is required to 
make a deposit of $5.00, which is returnable at the end of the 
Seminary course, less the insurance premium and any other nec- 
essary deductions. (See page 56.) 

A Matriculation Fee of $5.00 is required of each new student. 

CLASSIFICATION 

Regular Degree Students. Applicants for admission as 
students in full standing to take the prescribed course in prepara- 
tion for the Degree of B.D. must have a bachelor's degree from a 
standard college or university, the degree having been secured 
without duplication of credit. 

Part-Time Students. Students who are not so situated that 
they can devote full time to Seminary work may be admitted by 
the Faculty to take such courses as their time permits In prepara- 
tion for some form of Christian service. But they must have the 
same academic preparation, and furnish the same credentials, as 
are required of Regular Degree Students. 

Classification by Years. Students who register for the full 
course are, for practical purposes, classified normally as Juniors 
during their first academic year, as MIddlers during their second 
year, and as Seniors during their third year. 

Transferred Students. Persons qualified for admission to the 
Seminary, who have successfully completed partial courses In some 
other school of theology accredited by the American Association 
of Theological Schools, may be admitted by the Faculty to corres- 
ponding standing in this institution upon the presentation of 
satisfactory credentials, which should include (1) a certificate of 



THE FACULTY 






Rev. Paul R. Grahab 



George A. Long, D.D. A. H. Leitch. D.D., Ph.D 

President 






J. L. Kei.so, D.D.. Tii.D. T. M. Taylor, D.D. 



C. J. WiLLrAMSON, D.D. 






H. Ray Shear, D.D., M.A. Gordon Jackson, Th.M. John H. Gerstner, Ph.D. 






Harold L. Ralston Florence M. Lewis, M.A. D. L. Barbe, M.A. 

Mus. A.A.G.O. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 17 



good standing and honorable dismission, and (2) a complete 
official transcript of credits. Students transferring from non- 
accredited seminaries will be admitted only on probation. 

THE STUDENT'S SCHEDULE 

The Norvi. Students adequately prepared, are able to give 
full time to Seminary work, are expected to follow the regular 
schedule, involving 16 credit hours a term throughout the entire 
Seminary course. 

Extra-curricular Work. No student shall take academic work 
in excess of the norm, without special permission from the Faculty. 
A record of scholarly work is pre-requisite to the granting of such 
permission. Moreover, without special permission from the Fac- 
ulty, which will not be granted unless the case be strictly excep- 
tional, no student shall assume responsibility for a congregation 
as pastor or as stated supply. 

Limitations. Students having outside work of any kind in- 
volving heavy demands upon their time will be limited to such 
courses as they can carry satisfactorily. And those who, for any 
reason, fail to do a satisfactory grade of work in their scheduled 
studies will also be subject to limitation by the Faculty. 

The Minimum. Students must carry at least 12 hours of con- 
current Seminary work in order to be entitled to the privileges of 
the dormitory. 

Registration each Quarter. At the beginning of each quarter 
every student shall file with the Registrar a complete list of his 
studies, together with a memorandum of all his outside work, 
actual and proposed. When his schedule of studies has been ap- 
proved, no change may be made by the student without consulting 
the Registrar. 

ATTENDANCE 
Regular and prompt attendance is indispensable to satisfac- 
tory work. All absence, or even tardiness, for whatever reason, 
has an injurious effect on the student's standing and progress. 
Absence immediately preceding or immediately following any 
holiday period is charged double against the student's record. 
Excuses for absence must be presented in writing, to the profess- 
ors concerned, immediately upon return to class work; and shall 
specify date, classes missed, and cause of absence. 



18 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



EXAMINATIONS 

In order to test the student's progress in the various depart- 
ments, written examinations are held at the close of each quarter. 
From these examinations and the classroom work, the term grades 
of the student are determined. Seventy per cent, is required as a 
passing grade in every subject. A report of the student's attend- 
ance and credits is made to his presbytery, or corresponding 
church body, at the close of each quarter. 

GRADUATION: REQUIREMENTS AND AWARDS 

General Requirements. In order to graduate, a student must 
successfully complete the regular three-year course of prescribed 
and elective studies amounting to ISO quarter credit hours, includ- 
ing six units of field work. At least one year of work in residence 
is required for graduation. 

The Degree of B.D. The Diploma of the Seminary with the 
Degree of Bachelor of Divinity is conferred only upon Degree 
Students who complete the regular course in a manner satisfactory 
to the Faculty and who maintain more than average standing 
throughout their course. 

Graduation Fee. A fee of $5.00 is charged to cover the cost 
of Diploma. This fee is due the 15th of the month preceding 
graduation. 

Graduation Honors. The honor, Cum Laude, is granted to ail 
who throughout the Seminary course are clearly distinguished 
(1) for academic attainments, (2) for regular and punctual at- 
tendance, and (3) for general fitness for the gospel ministry. 
The honor, Magna Cum Laude, is granted to all who possess these 
qualifications in an unusual degree; and, Summa Cum Laude, in 
very rare instance, in recognition of superlative merit. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 19 



SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS 



I 



The following competitive scholarships have been provided 
for the benefit of United Presbyterian students for the ministry. 
In order to compete, contestants must carry not less than the reg- 
ular quota of studies; they must complete each term's work satis- 
factorily, without any conditions or failures; and they must fur- 
thermore meet the particular requirements of the desired scholar- 
ship or prize as hereinafter specified. Under each scholarship an 
award is made once each year, at which time the Faculty considers 
all regular degree students who, during the preceding twelve 
months, have completed the necessary amount of work in a 
satisfactory manner. 

The James Purdy Scholarship 

There exists in the possession of the Seminary the Purdy Fund, 
bearing the name of Its founder. The Income, not to exceed $300, 
Is apportioned equally each year to the six members of the Junior 
Class who attain the highest average of excellence In their Seminary 
work. The scholarship is subject to the conditions that no award 
be made to a student whose general average is not above 85% 
or who receives a grade of less than 80% in any department, and 
that the entire Seminary course be finished at this Seminary. 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship 

In memory of the late Thomas Jamison, Esq., of the North 
Side, Pittsburgh, for many years a member of the Board oi 
Trustees of the Seminary, Mrs. Jamison endowed a scholarship, 
the income of which, not to exceed $800, is given every year to the 
member of the Senior Class who attains the highest average in 
excellence of scholarship In qualifications for the Christian ministry 
during the Junior and Middle years and the first term of the Sen- 
ior year. In the matter of grades, his general average must reach 
90%, and in no study must the grade be lower than 80%. The 
winner of this award must present to the Faculty within the terms 
of the scholarship a thesis of not less than 10,000 words on a sub- 
ject selected or approved by the Faculty, 

While this award is made without further conditions attached, 
It Is the hope of the Faculty that each Jamison scholar will ap- 



20 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



predate the importance of maintaining the Seminary's ideals and 
traditions of scholarship, and that he will use the award promptly 
in connection with a full session of graduate study in some insti- 
tution selected or approved by the Faculty. In this connection, he 
will be expected to make regular reports of the work he is doing 
and submit transcript of grades received. This scholarship offers 
substantial assistance to a worthy man each year in broadening 
his theological education and obtaining the rich culture which comes 
with advanced study at the graduate level. 

The Jane Hogg Gardner Scholarship 

To the Senior student ranking second in qualifications for 
the ministry through the entire course, the Seminary awards the 
income of the Gardner bequest, not to exceed ^200, but on condi- 
tion that there is no grade of less than 80% in any department, 
and that a satisfactory thesis of at least 5,000 words on an assigned 
subject be presented to the Faculty within a year from graduation. 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Foundation 

By bequest, in memory of her husband, the late Mrs. Hen- 
rietta M. Lee, of Oakmont Pa., established the "Robert A. 
Lee Church History Foundation," the annual income of which is 
to be given to the Senior student who ranks first in the entire 
course in Church History. Candidates for this award must attend 
this Seminary from the beginning of their Junior year and re- 
ceive no grade less than 80% in any department. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



21 



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ELECTIVE COURSES 

The following Elective Courses are available to qualified undregraduates 
(ordinarily Middlers and Seniors), and also to students in the Graduate Depart- 
ment, who may apply them toward their degree in the fields indicated. 
(See page ) 



Course 



Quarter 
Hours 



042. Church Music 


3 




X 


X 


X 


143. Inter-Testament History 


3 


X 


X 






ISO. T Canon and Text (given with 250) 


l'/2 


X 


X 






151, 152, Hebrew Exegesis (each) 


. 3 


X 








153. Hebrew Critical Paper .... 


3 


X 








155. Geography of Bible Lands 


3 


X 




X 


X 


157. Archaeology of Palestine 


. 3 


X 








158. Seminar in Archaeology 


. 3 


X 








160. Current Trends in T Criticism 


. 3 


X 








163. Theology of Isaiah .... 


. 3 


X 


x 


X 




166. Christ's Use of the T _. _ . 


. 3 


X 


X 


X 




250. N T Canon and Textual Criticism 


1^ 


X 


X 






253. Greek Critical Paper 


. 3 


X 








254. Readings in the Koine Papri 


3 


X 








255. Exegetical Seminar .... 


3 


X 








260. The Church and Its Art 


3 


X 






X 


261. Critical Introduction to the Pauline Epistle 


s 3 


X 








262. Recent Developments in Synoptic Criticisn 


1 3 


X 








263. Critical Introduction to the Johannine Writing 


3 3 


X 








264. History of the Christian Liturgy . 


. 3 


X 


X 




X 


265. Research in New Testament 


3 


X 






X 


266. The World Church .... 


3 


X 


X 






350. The Parables of Jesus .... 


. 3 


X 


X 




X 


352. The Gospel According to John 


. 3 


X 






X 


353. The Epistles to the Hebrews . 


3 


X 






X 


354. Isaiah I 


3 


X 






X 


355. Isaiah II 


3 


X 






X 


356. Jeremiah ...... 


3 


X 






X 


357. Ezekiel and Daniel . . . . 


3 








X 


450. Comparative Religion .... 


3 




X 


X 


X 


451. The Early American Church 


1 




X 






453. American Church Biography 


3 




X 






454. Religious Movements in America 


3 




X 




X 


455. Bible Characters . .... 


3 




X 


X 


X 


550. Doctrinal Thesis ..... 


3 




X 






551. Ref. Theologians: Martin Luther 


3 




X 


X 




552. Ref. Theologians: John Calvin 


3 




X 


X 




553. Ref. Theologians: John Knox 


3 




X 


X 




556. Modern Theology & Theologians 


3 




X 


X 


X 


651. Problems in Modern Christian Thought 


3 




X 


X 


X 


652. Theory and Practice of Devotional Life 


3 






X 


X 


653. Christian Ethics .... 


3 




X 


X 


X 


654. Rise of Modern Religious Thought 


3 




X 


X 


X 


655. Building a Church Program 


3 






X 


X 


656. Problems of Our Culture: A Seminar 


3 




X 




X 


658. History of the Philosophy of Religion 


3 




X 


X 


X 


659. Psychology of Religion 


3 




X 


X 


X 


750. Seminary in Sermon Composition 


3 








X 


751. Preaching from the Old Testament 


3 








X 


752. Preaching in the First Five Centuries 


.3 






X 


X 


756. Rural Church Leadership 


3 






X 


X 


757. Personal Evangelism .... 


3 






X 


X 


851, 852. Radio Speaking (each) 


1 






X 


X 


854. Materials for Public Speaking 


3 






X 


X 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 23 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



SEMITICS AND BIBLICAL ARCHAEOLOGY 
Dr. Kelso 

The aim of this department is to give the student an appreciation and 
an understanding of the Old Testament. To that end courses are offered (1) 
in the Hebrew language and its peculiar thought techniques, (2) in the Arch' 
aeology of the ancient Near East, (3) in the detailed History of the Hebrew 
people, and (4) in the Old Testament Theology as contrasted with the hea' 
then religions of those days. Seminar courses studying the latest books 
and magazine articles teach the student how he can evaluate and use new 
materials when he gets into the pastorate. An excellent Bible Lands Museum 
serves as a class room in this department. 

Ill, 112. Old Testament History. A study of the political and religious 
history of the Hebrew people from the days of Abraham to the close of the 
Old Testament, with special emphasis on the more significant personalities, 
events and institutions. The results of archaeological research are studied 
in conjunction with the Biblical record. 

Juniors, fall and winter, 3 quarter hours credit each term. 

143. Inter-Testament History. A resume of the Persian and Greek 
periods in Palestine, and a detailed study of the Maccabaean and Roman 
periods, so as to give the student a broad background for the New Testament 
study. The Apocrypha is studied in detail. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

121. Hebrew Language. A practical course in the Hebrew Language 
designed to achieve the following objective: to familiarize the student with a 
working vocabulary of the language and the essential features of its gram- 
mar. A text with lectures and written exercises. 

Middlers, fall term, 6 recitations a week, 4 quarter hours credit. 

122, 123. Hebrew Reading. A course in the accurate translation an inter- 
pretation of BibUcal Hebrew designed to show the wealth of sermonic ma- 
terial in the original Hebrew. Selected Psalms and historical passages. 

Middlers, winter and spring, 3 quarter hours credit each term. 

131. Old Testament Theology. A detailed study of the major doctrines 
of the Old Testament, with a quick survey of the historical progress of 
Revelation in the Hght of contemporary civilizations and religions. 

Seniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

150. Old Testament Canon and Text. History of the formation of the 
Hebrew Canon, with emphasis upon the rejection of the Apocrypha. A 
brief history of the Hebrew text and the major versions. 

Elective, IJ/2 quarter hours credit. (Given with No. 250). 



24 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



151, 152. Hebrew Exegesis. Practice in acquiring the principles of Old 
Testament exegesis, not only from the Hnguistic field, but also from the 
archaeological source material. The more difficult Hebrew passages with 
rich sermonic possibiUties are used. 

Elective, Seniors, 3 quarter hours credit for each course. 

153. Hebrew Critical. In order to enable the students to meet the 
requirements of their respective presbyteries in connection with ordination, 
provision is made for each Senior to present a critical paper on the Hebrew 
text of an assigned passage from the Old Testament. There will be individ' 
ual conferences by appointment for reports of progress, during the first 
week of each month of the term. Papers will be due on the last day pre- 
ceding examinations. 

Elective, Seniors, fall or winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

155. Geography of Bible Lands. A survey course covering the major 
features of all ancient geography which influenced Biblical history, and a 
detailed study of Palestinian geography and its relation to Old Testament 
history and the customs and manners of its peoples. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

157. Archaeology of Palestine. A rapid historical survey of archaeological 
work in Bible lands, with particular attention to the cultural and religious 
hfe of the Israelite and non'Israelite populations in Palestine. Methods of 
archaeological research and the interpretation of findings are studied, not 
only for apologetic purposes, but especially for the exegetical study of the 
Scriptures. Assigned readings, slides and materials from the Bible lands 
museum. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

158. Seminar in Archaeology. The period of the Exodus and Conquest. 
A research course in which the student becomes acquainted not only with all 
available historical and archaeological source materials, but also with the 
proper methods of presenting his conclusions in such a fashion that they 
will be helpful to the average church member. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

160. Current Trends in Old Testament Criticism. A course designed to 
train students in the evaluation of new books and technical magazine articles 
in all fields of Old Testament research. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 25 

NEW TESTAMENT LITERATURE AND EXEGESIS 
Dr. Taylor Mr. Graham 

The work in this department is centered in the history, literature and 
interpretation of our Primary Source, the New Testament. The aim through' 
out is to impress upon the student the uniqueness of Christianity and its 
Textbook; and to make the study of the New Testament both inspirational 
and practical, looking toward the future pastoral and homiletical work of 
the student. Each student is expected to read, at one sitting, each of the 
New Testament books in its entirety during the period when it is under class' 
room consideration. These readings will follow the text of the Revised 
Standard Version. Repeated readings are advised. The student may use the 
Greek text of Tischendorf (VIII Edition), Westcott and Hort, or Nestle (16tih 
Edition, 1936) in the exegetical and critical work. (Except as otherwise 
indicated, courses are given by the professor in charge). 

211. Elementary Greek. New students who are not properly qualified for 
work in New Testament Exegesis are required to study the elements of the 
Greek language. A suitable text is used, and special attention is given to 
vocabulary, verbal forms and syntax. 

Juniors (J^), fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. Mr. Graham 

212. Elementary Greek. Grammar and syntax continued. 

Juniors (J^), winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. Mr. Graham 

213. Elementary Greek. Portions of the Gospel according to John and 
of the CathoHc Epistles are read critically in the Greek. 

Juniors (J^), spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. Mr. Graham 

214. Greek Reading. Readings in the New Testament, with grammar re' 
view and drill. This course is designed for those students who have had some 
Greek but who need additional study and practice in order to gain that prO' 
ficiency in language which is demanded by the exegetical courses. 

Juniors (J^), fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. Mr. Graham 

215. Greek Reading. A continuation of course No. 214. (Credit given, 
but not applicable on two semesters required Exegesis). 

Juniors (J^), winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. Mr. Graham 

217. Biblical Interpretation, (a) The Oriental Mind: Jesus was an Ori' 
ental. Who ministered and preached to Orientals. Adequate interpretation 
of Scripture, therefore, demands an understanding of Oriental, and particularly 
Semitic, psychology and logic. A study is made of them, using the Scrip' 
tures and contemporary literature, together with experiences from modern 
Oriental life, for documentation. Lectures, readings, and discussion, (b) 
Hermeneutics proper: A review of the history of interpretation in the Church, 
with a determination of the principles of sound exegesis as exemplified in the 
grammatico'historical method. Lectures and discussion. 

Juniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

221. New Testament Introduction, (a) New Testament World: The his- 
torical setting in which the New Testament appeared, — old Greek religion, 
later Hellenistic mystery religions, HellenistiC'Judaism and the Jewish sects. 
(b) The Gospels and Acts: Introduction and survey, Synoptic and Johan' 
nine problems, Luke'Acts and apostolic history. Textbook, lectures and 
required readings. 

Middlers, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



26 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



222. New Testament Introduction, (a) Pauline Epistles: Historical, lit' 
erary and critical study with a survey of the text, (b) General Epistles: 
Introduction and survey. (c) Apocalypse: Introduction and survey. A 
sympathetic review of the various schools of interpretation. 

Middlers, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

242. New Testament Greek Exegesis. Epistle of the Romans: A re 
view of the principles of Hermeneutics, followed by a critical study of the 
Greek text in application of these principles. The first few chapters are 
dealt with illustratively by lectures, followed by a general class assignment, 
the remainder of the term being given over to individual assignments. 
Lectures, collateral readings, reports and discussions. 

Middlers and qualified Juniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

243 New Testament Greek Exegesis. Epistle to the Hebrews: Contin- 
uation of the report and discussion method. (See Course No. 242 above). 
Middlers and qualified Juniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

250. New Testament Canon and Textual Criticism, (a) The Canon: A 
study of the formation of the New Testament. The limiting principle of 
the Canon and the consequent rejection of apocryphal and pseudepigraph' 
ical works. The position of the Roman Church, of the Church of 
England, and of the Presbyterian and Reformed bodies as shown in the West- 
minster Confession. Lectures and required readings. (b) Textual Criti' 
cism: A survey of the history of the printed text, with an introduction to 
the apparatus criticus and the principles of textual criticism. An appraisal 
of the Tischendorf, Nestle, and Westcott and Hort texts. Textbook, 
lectures and required readings. 

Elective, V/z quarter hours credit. (Given with No. HO). 

253. Greek Critical. In order to enable the students to meet the re 
quirements of their respective presbyteries in connection with ordination, 
provision is made for each senior to present a critical paper on the Greek 
text of an assigned passage from the New Testament. There will be a 
minimum of three individual conferences by appointment, scheduled during 
the term for each registrant. Papers are due on the last Friday before 
the examinations of the term. 

Elective, Seniors, fall or winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

254. Readings in the Koine Papyri. An advanced course dealing with 
the non'literary papyri discovered within recent years. Their bearing upon 
our understanding of New Testament words and phrases. The aim is to 
provide a broader knowledge of first century thought for a fuller and more 
accurate interpretation of the New Testament. 

Elective, for advanced students, 3 quarter hours credit. 

255. Exegetical Seminar. For the advanced Greek student especially 
interested in Exegesis. A choice of research problems in exegesis is permit- 
ted each student. Reports for round-table discussion. A summary written 
paper is presented in lieu of a final examination. 

Elective, Seniors and qualified Middlers, 3 quarter hours credit. 

260. The Church and Its Art. (a) The Origin and Development of the 
Church Edifice, traced through the various architectural periods from the 
diaspora synagogues to the present, showing the different lines of influence. 
A discussion of architectural styles adaptable and suitable to the requirements 
of the American Church today. Illustrated lectures, readings and discussions. 
(b) Christian Art and Symbolism: A survey of Christian graphic and plastic 
art through the centuries. The importance of symbolism to the early Chris- 
tians, and its place in the Church's art today. Illustrated lectures, readings 
and discussions. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 27 



261. Critical Introduction to the Pauline Epistles. A rapid survey of 
Paul's life on the basis of a synthesis of the records in Acts and the Epistles. 
The origin and completion of the Corpus Paulmum. The groupings of 
the ten major epistles. Recent criticism of the authorship of II Thess., Col., 
Eph., and of the place of origin of the captivity correspondence. The prob' 
lems of Romans 16, and of the Pastorals. Sacramentalism, and other 
mystery features in Pauline theology. 

Elective, for advanced students, 3 quarter hours credit. 

262. Recent Developments in Synoptic Criticism. An introduction to 
formgeschichte, with a critical appraisal of its strong points and weaknesses, 
its possibilities and dangers. The possible permanent values which it may 
contribute in the field of New Testament study. An adequate working 
knowledge of Greek is required. 

Elective, for advanced students, 3 quarter hours credit. 

263. Critical Introduction to the Johannine Writings. An appraisal of 
recent criticism as to the unity of the Fourth Gospel and the so'called 
epistles, and as to the relationship of the Apocalypse to the Johannine group, 
dealing with the differences in grammar, vocabulary and thought'concepts. 
The Apocalypse in the field of apocalyptics. Antagonism toward it among 
the early Fathers and among the Reformers. 

Elective, for advanced students, 3 quarter hours credit. 

264. History of the Christian Liturg)'. The liturgy of the Church traced 
from the prcChristian synagogue through the period of development to the 
crystallization of the Roman rite in the time of Gregory III. Special study 
of the origins of the AntC'Communion (Proanaphora) and of the Commun' 
ion (Anaphora), and of their early association. The development of the 
Canonical Hours. Sources: I Clement, Ignatian Epistles, Didache, Justin's 
First Apology, Canons of Hyppolytus, and The Apostolic Constitutions. 

Elective, Seniors and Graduates, 3 quarter hours credit. 

265. Research in the New Testament. Directed research along various 
lines as indicated by the student's needs. 

Elective, Graduate Students, 3 quarter hours credit. 

266. The World Church. A course designed to acquaint students with 
what the late Archbishop of Canterbury, William Temple, called "the great 
new fact of our era" — the world-wide Church of Jesus Christ. The Moravian 
and Methodist revivals of the 18th Century, their eventuation in the great 
missionary outreach of the Church in the past two centuries, and the natural 
development of the ecumenical spirit on the mission fields of the world. The 
ecumenical movement will be studied from its inception to the present, 
together with existential problems facing the ecumenical Church in both 
its hfe and activities today. Textbook, collateral readings, and discussion. 

Elective. 3 credit hours. 



28 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



ENGLISH BIBLE 

Dr. Long 

It is the aim of this department to provide, in close co'operation with 
other departments, a careful study of the content of the English Bible. 
Courses are designed so that, in connection with the Old Testament and New 
Testament departments, opportunity is given to the student to study, either 
in the original language or in English, every book of the Bible, with a view 
to securing not only a knowledge of the authorship, critical questions and 
historical background, but also a knowledge of the Scripture itself. 



312. The Gospels. There will be literary and historical study of the 
Gospels, covering their general features, a survey of their content and the 
relation of the Synoptics to the Fourth Gospel. Critical questions in con' 
nection with the Gospels will be studied in Course No. 221. 

Juniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



313. The Life of Christ. The life of Christ will be studied on the basis 
of the materials contained in the Gospels, — His birth, baptism, temptation, 
self'consciousness, teachings, miraculous activity, crucifixion, resurrection 
and ascension. 

Juniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



321. The Poetical Books. This course is designed to provide (a) a general 
introduction to the poetry and wisdom writings of the ancient Hebrews; (b) 
a comprehensive survey of the Psalter; and (c) an analysis of Job, Eccle- 
siastes and the Song of Songs. 

Middlers, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



332. The Eighth Century Prophets. There will be (a) a general survey 
of prophetism in Israel, its origin and development from earliest times to the 
time of the canonical prophets; (b) historical introduction to the Prophets 
of the Eighth Century, B.C.; and (c) a detailed study of Amos, Hosea, 
Micah and Isaiah. Attention will be given to the social ethics of these 
prophecies and their bearings on contemporary life. 

Seniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. Prof. Jackson 



333. The Later Prophets. The course includes a study of the historical 
introduction to and the contents of the writings of the prophets who ap' 
peared in the critical years of the late seventh century B.C., and in the re 
construction period following the exile. Attention will be given to the un' 
usual literary features, exegetical studies of outstanding passages, and the 
permanent values of the teachings of these prophets. 

Seniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. Prof. Jackson 

350. The Parables of Jesus. A careful study of the incomparable para* 
bles of our Lord, which occupied so large a place in His teaching. Attention 
will be given to their meaning for our Lord's hearers, and to their teaching 
for our own day. Homiletic values will be thoroughly reviewed. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



29 



352. The Gospel According to John. An intensive study of the content 
of this Gospel. While some attention is given to questions of introduction, 
the central emphasis is on the purpose, the message, and the contribution it 
makes to our interpretation of Christ. Homiletic values are specifically 
considered. 

Elective, Seniors and Graduates, 3 quarter hours credit. 

353. The Epistle to the Hebrews. This course consists of a somewhat 
detailed study of the contents and arrangement of the Epistle. The aim is 
not only to acquaint the student with the materials and the flow of the 
argument in this book, but with a method of Bible study by book and chapter. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Shear 

354. Isaiah I. A study of the first thirtynine chapters of the Prophecy of 
Isaiah. Attention is given to the historic background, to the content, and 
especially to its relevance for our day. 

Elective, Seniors and Graduates, 3 quarter hours credit. 

355. Isaiah II. A study of chapters forty to sixtysix. A thorough review 
of the content is undertaken, with special emphasis upon its Messianic teach' 
ing. As in Isaiah I, homiletic values are given consideration. 

Elective, Seniors and Graduates, 3 quarter hours credit. 

356. Jeremiah. This course is a careful study of the life and work of this 
great prophet. Attention is given to the prophecy in the light of contempor' 
ary history and especially to the contribution made to the central message of 
the Bible. Its relevance for our day and its homiletical values are considered. 

Elective, Seniors and Graduates, 3 quarter hours credit. 

357. Ezekiel and Daniel. A study of the text, the exilic background and 
the post'exilic influence of Ezekiel. Problems presented by recent criticism 
are noted. Special attention is given to the symbolism and apocalyptic 
visions of Daniel in the hght of history. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Shear 



Courses in English Bible in Other Departments 

111, 112. Old Testament History. 

Juniors, 3 quarter hours credit for each course. Dr. Kelso 

113. Inter-Testament History. 

Elective, Juniors, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Kelso 

221, 222. New Testament Introduction. 

Middlers, 3 quarter hours credit for each course. Dr. Taylor 

455. Bible Characters. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Gerstner 

751. Preaching from the Old Testament. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Shear 



30 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



CHURCH HISTORY 
Dr. Gerstner 

411. Church History, Apostolic and Ancient. From the apostolic age to 
the barbarian invasions. The Council of Jerusalem; the early Church, the 
conflicts with heathenism and heresy, doctrinal controversies; the grovi^h 
oi ritual and discipline; great church leaders. 

Juniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

412. Mediaeval Church History. Barbarian invasions; growth in influence 
of the papacy; Mohammedanism; the Holy Roman Empire; the Crusades; 
monastic orders; universities; Scholasticism; Mysticism; the Renaissance. 

Juniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

413. Modern Church History. The Reformation in different countries; 
the Counter'Reformation; the Puritans; the Pietists; American churches 
and their European antecedents, their origins, leaders and influence. 

Juniors, spring term, 4 quarter hours credit. 

431. Christian Missions. An examination of the principal mission fields, 
including those of the United Presbyterian Church. Lives of outstanding 
missionaries in various fields. The problems, methods, and opportunities of 
mission work. Methods of missionary instruction in congregations. 

Seniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

433. History of Doctrine. The development and formulation of Christian 
dogma from Apostolic times to the present. 

Seniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

434. Church Government. Discussion method. Principles and forms of 
church government; government and discipline of the United Presbyterian 
Church; church courts; practical workings of church law. 

Seniors, fall term, 1 quarter hour credit. 



450. Comparative Religion. An outline of the history, beliefs, literature 
and practices of the nou'Christian religions, with special emphasis on Mc 
hammedanism, Hinduism, and Buddhism. Elements of strength and of 
weakness in non'Christian faiths. Complete superiority of the Christian 
religion. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



I 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 31 



451. The Early American Church. The European background of the 
American- churches. The Puritans and Pilgrims. Relation of the Church 
to the developing life of the different colonies. Liberal tendencies and 
religious diversities. The Great Awakening. The War of the Revolution 
and its effect on religious life. Nationali2;ation of the churches in the 
United States. Missionary work at home and abroad. 

Elective, 1 quarter hour credit. 



453. American Church Biography. Lives and contemporary influence of 
outstanding ministers of America from colonial times to the present. Their 
methods and outstanding points of effectiveness. Great Christian laymen 
in different denominations. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



454. Religioua Movements in America. Revivalism; anti'Christian cults; 
Christian Science, Russellism, Mormonism, Spiritualism, etc. The Group 
movements. Great American preachers. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



32 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 

SYSTEMATIC AND BIBLICAL THEOLOGY 
Dr. Leitch 

The aim of this department is to ground the student in the doctrines of 
our evangeHcal faith. The method includes assigned readings, lectures, note 
book work and class'room discussion. The subject is taken up in the fol' 
lowing order, the first few lessons serving the purpose of orientation. 

513. Systematic Theology, (a) The Doctrine of God: the attributes of 
the Divine Being; the tri'personality of God; the decrees and works of God, 
— creation, preservation and providence, (b) The Doctrine of Angels: their 
nature and employments. 

Juniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

522. Systematic Theology. (a) Introduction to Theology: the idea 
purpose and importance of Theology; the source of material; the requisites 
to successful study; preview of the doctrinal system, (b) Revelation: the 
possibility and probability of special Revelation, the claims of Scripture, 
the credibility of the writers, various evidences of the supernatural character 
of the Bible, (c) The Inspiration of the Scriptures, as held by our Church, 
set forth and defended. 

Middlers, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

523. Systematic Theology, (a) The Doctrine of Man: the origin and 
primitive state of man; the unity of the human race; essentials of the moral 
and spiritual nature, (b) The Doctrine of Sin: the Fall of man; the nature 
and universality of sin; the consequences of sin to mankind. 

Middlers, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

531. Systematic Theology, (a) The Doctrine of Christ the Redeemer: 
the preparation for redemption; the person of Christ, His two natures and 
states; the offices and work of Christ, with special study of the Atonement. 
(b) The Doctrine of the Holy Spirit: the application of redemption, — 
election, calling, regeneration, conversion, union with Christ, justification, 
adoption, sanctification. 

Seniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

532. Systematic Theology, (a) The Doctrine of the Church: its na' 
ture, membership, purpose and power; the sacraments of Baptism and the 
Lord's Supper, (b) The Doctrine of Last Things: death, the intermediate 
state, the second coming of Christ, the resurrection, the judgment and final 
awards. 

Seniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



533. Apologetics. The development and defense of Christianity, in which 

a survey is made of the old arguments against the Christian faith and the 
classical defenses which have been built up across the centuries. Special inter' 
est centers on the modern apologia for our faith. 

Seniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 33 



550. Doctrinal Thesis. In order to enable students to meet the require 
ments of their respective presbyteries in connection with ordination, pre 
vision is made for the preparation of a Doctrinal Thesis. This involves 
intensive study in a well-defined field. In determining the subject, the 
student's preference is considered but his choice must have the approval 
of the department. Periodic reports of progress are required. The com' 
pleted manuscript is due on the day preceding term examinations. 

Elective. Middlers, spring term; or, Seniors, fall term; 3 quarter hours credit. 



551. Reformation Theologians: Martin Luther. Following a brief bic 
graphical and historical study of Martin Luther, consideration is given to 
the leading features of Luther's teachings, especially as they are applicable 
to the problems of theology and churchmanship in our own day. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



552. Reformation Theologians: John Calvin. Following a brief biograph' 
ical and historical study of John Calvin, consideration is given to the leading 
features of Calvin's teachings, especially as they are applicable to the prob' 
lems of theology and churchmanship in our own day. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



553. Reformation Theologians: John Knox. Following a brief biographical 
and historical study of John Knox, consideration is given to the leading 
features of Knox's teachings, especially as they are applicable to the problems 
of theology and churchmanship in our own day. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

556. Modern Theology and Theologians. Beginning with the turn of the 
nineteenth century, a brief review is given of modern theological trends 
down to our own day. At this point, leaders in contemporary theology are 
reviewed from the standpoint of their major teachings and their relationship 
to perennial theological issues. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



34 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 

PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION AND RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 
Professor Jackson 

The aims of this department are to develop a certain skill in, and apprc 
ciation for, the disciplines of Philosophy of Religion, Psychology of Re 
ligion. Christian Ethics, and Christian Education; and to make articulate 
for our time through Christian Education, the Christian Faith. 

613. Introduction to Philosophy and Psychology of Religion. An intro' 
ductory study of the basic philosophical and psychological principles and 
problems involved in the religious experience. 

Juniors with inadequate philosophical background, spring term, 3 quarter 

hours credit. 

621. Christian Education. A basic course in the philosophy of Christian 
education. After a study of the history, principles, and presuppositions of 
Christian Education, attention is centered upon problems within the modern 
church. 

Middlers, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

631. Philosophy of Religion. A course designed to help the student con' 
struct a Christian world'view. This study looks especially to the confusions 
and needs of modern man, and gives guidance toward an integrated Christian 
faith. 

Seniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 

651. Problems in Modern Christian Thought. The aim of this course is 
to examine the chief philosophies and movements which confront the spread 
of the Gospel in our day, such as Naturalism, Humanism, Secularism, and 
Marxism. The resources of the Christian Faith are seen in the contemporary 
setting as providing an ample apologetic. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

652. Theory and Practice of the Devotional Life. A consideration of 
the devotional life of the Christian in the modern world. The relation of 
doctrine to the devotional life. Techniques toward the practice of the 
presence of God. This course is also designed to acquaint the student with 
the devotional classics. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

653. Christian Ethics. The theological bases of ethics. Christian norms 
for ethical decisions. The problem of conscience; the meaning of community; 
the relation of love and justice; the Kingdom of God and history. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

654. Rise of Modem Religious Thought. This course will make a brief 
study of such seminal thinkers as Schleiermacher, Ritschl, Kierkegaard, 
tracing their influence on such modern movements as the Social Gospel, 
Continental theology, and American neo'orthodoxy. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

655. Building a Church Program. The concern is to construct a church 
program around Worship, Study, Fellowship, Evangelism, and Administra- 
tion; to see the program whole; and to deal with problematical situations. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

656. Problems of Our Culture: A Seminar. 
Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

658. History of the Philosophy of Religion. A survey of some important 
philosophies of rehgion from Plato to Whitehead. Outlines of these sys' 
tems presented, and their influence upon the Christian tradition traced. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 

659. Psychology of Religion. After a brief historical survey of the field, 
an analysis is made of the various religious experiences, such as conversion, 
mysticism, prayer, worship, emotionalism. The latter part of the course 
views the pastor as counselor. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 35 

PRACTICAL THEOLOGY 
Dr. Shear 



711, 712. Homiletics. A basic course dealing with the planning, prepara' 
tion and delivery of sermons. The meaning and importance of preaching, 
the sources of material, the types of sermons, the choice of themes and texts, 
the sermon outline, — are some of the matters to be dealt with. Students 
are required to submit weekly for class criticism outlines of sermons on as' 
signed texts, and to prepare in full one sermon for pulpit delivery before 
the Faculty. 

Juniors, fall and winter terms, 3 quarter hours credit each term. 



721. Homiletics. Emphasis is placed in this course on expository preach' 
ing in the New Testament. The student is expected to submit for appraisal 
(a) weekly outlines of sermons on assigned texts, (b) reports on sermons by 
representative preachers in the several periods of church history, (c) one fully 
written sermon on a text chosen by the student from an assigned book of 
the New Testament. 

Middlers, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



723. Pastoral Theology. This course introduces the student to the office 
and work of a pastor of a congregation. It deals, through lectures and dis' 
cussions, with the call, the character and the preparation of a minister and 
with the relations which he sustains to his home, his congregation, his com' 
munity, his denomination and to society at large. The student will read 
and submit reviews of two books chosen from a designated list. 

Middlers, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. 



732. Pastoral Theology. A comprehensive course of lectures and dis' 
cussions touching every phase of the pastor's relationship to the congrega' 
tion. It deals with the pastor as a leader of public worship, as an adminis' 
trator of the sacraments, as conductor of weddings and funerals, as director 
of religious education, as evangelist, as promotor of stewardship, as organ' 
izer and administrator of church activities, as personal counselor and visitor 
in homes and hospitals and institutions. The Secretary of the Board of Ad' 
ministration will present a series of lectures dealing with the pastor's rela' 
tionship to the organised work of the denomination. Three books are 
read and reviewed in written reports. 

Seniors, winter term, 4 quarter hours credit. 



750. Seminar in Sermon Composition. A course for advanced students 
who desire more training in the composition of sermons. Special attention 
will be given to richness of vocabulary, literary style, imaginative thought 
and use of illustration. Students submit their manuscripts for group diS' 
cussion. 

Elective, open only to advanced students who have had all required courses 
in homiletics, 3 quarter hours credit. 



36 The Pittseurgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



751. Preaching from the Old Testament. The Scriptures which Jesus 
knew and of which he said, "These are they which bear witness of me," are 
rich mines of sermon suggestion and material. This course aims to offer 
suggestions as to themes and their development in all parts of the Old Testa' 
ment, historical, poetical and prophetical. Lectures will be supplemented 
by collateral reading and by the writing of sermons on assigned texts by 
the students. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. ; 



752. Preaching in the First Five Centuries. A study of the doctrinal and 
ethical content, the literary style, the homiletic method and the spiritual 
background of preaching in the early centuries from the days of the apostles 
to the break'up of the Roman Empire. Largely a reading course with class 
discussions. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



756. Rural Church Leadership. This is an auxiliary course in pastoral 
theology for those who expect to serve rural or small village churches in 
agricultural communities. Consideration will be given to the special social, 
economic and technical problems of agricultural people as they relate to the 
Church and Christian living. 

Elective, Seniors and Graduates, 3 quarter hours credit. 



757. Personal Evangelism. The primary aim of the Church is evangelism. 
This course deals first with the history of evangelism in general, and then 
with the modern renaissance of lay visitation evangeHsm. It aims to pre 
pare the student for the work of organizing and carrying through a program 
of visitation evangelism through the Church or the Bible School. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



CHURCH MUSIC 



042. Church Music. A study of the great hymns and tunes of the Church 
including a brief historical survey of their development. Special attention 
is given to the Metrical Psalmody and Hymnody of the Calvinistic bodies. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. Mr. Ralston 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 37 



Chapel Preaching 

Every student in the course of his work at the Seminary is required to 
preach three sermons (one each year) before the Faculty and student body. 
Texts or topics are assigned, and the sermons are publicly criticized by mem- 
bers of the faculty and graded on the basis of content, style and delivery. 



Field Work 
Six Credits Required for Graduation 

A. Junior students are assigned to local churches under the direction of 
the respective pastors. The purpose is to give the student direct contact with, 
and practical experience in, the organizational activities of the church. The 
work to which students are assigned varies, depending upon local conditions 
and upon the student's capacity and adaptability. Ordinarily it consists of 
teaching, visiting, working with young people, supervising boys' groups, and 
assisting in the service of music and in the conduct of public worship. The 
student worker receives a minimum of $80.00 for the school year, together 
with necessary expenses, from the church he serves. Seminars, based on 
reports from the students and the fields, are conducted from time to time, 
as occasion requires. Two credits toward graduation are given for satisfacotry 
work in this field. 

B. For the four additional credits in field work the student is ordinarily re- 
quired to spend the summer following the Middle Year (or the equivalent of 
four months), in a home mission station, or as a student pastor of a vacant 
congregation, or as a student assistant to a regular pastor. This work is under 
the joint supervision of the Secretary of the Board of American Missions, the 
Synodical Superintendent of Missions, and the Department of Practical 
Theology of the Seminary. The student will receive a minimum of $100.00 
per month, plus traveling expenses to and from his field. 

C. Middle and Senior students who, for one reason or another, wish to 
engage in extra-curricular field work during the school year, must secure 
special permission from the Faculty. No credit toward graduation will be 
given for this work, except by special action of the Faculty. 

D. Students of other denominations, in order to receive credit for similarly 
supervised field work in which they may engage, must explain the nature 
of such work to the Department of Practical Theology and secure the ap' 
proval of the Faculty. 



Special Announcement 

During the year 1950-1951, under the auspices of the Board 
of American Missions, a series of special lectures on problems in 
the field of Home Missions will be delivered by outstanding 
authorities. 



38 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 

Professor Barbe 

The purpose of this department is to assist each student to increase his 
effectiveness in pubHc address and oral reading. Speech training is required 
of each student throughout the Junior year, or until sufficient ability is shown 
to enable him to discharge the speech responsibilities of a student preacher 
satisfactorily. 

The services of this department are available to all students needing special 
help with speech problems, especially in preparing for the delivery of sermons 
before the Faculty and student body. 

A recording is made of each chapel sermon for purposes of reference 
and study. 

A placement examination is given to all new students. Those who have 
had 4 to 6 semester credit hours in "Speech Fundamentals" at the college 
level and who meet the requirements of the placement examination will be 
placed in the advanced Junior speech class. 

811. Public Speaking. A study of the fundamental principles of speech, 
appertaining to both composition and delivery, with frequent classroom 
performances, criticised by the instructor. 

Juniors, fall term, 1 quarter hour credit. 

811 A. Advanced Public Speaking. This course is based strictly on the 
principles of persuasion and their application in public and non'public 
situations. 

Juniors, fall term, 1 quarter hour credit. 

812. Public Speaking. A continuation of Course No. 811, with exercises in 
voice production and articulation. Recordings will be used in the study of 
individual voice problems of students. 

Juniors, winter term, 1 quarter hour credit. 

812A. Advanced Public Speaking. A continuation of Course No. 81 lA, 
with attention to the basic psychological principles which are important 
in controUing the belief and behaviour of various types of audiences. Ex' 
perience in speaking before the classroom audience. 

Juniors, winter term, 1 quarter hour credit. 

813. Public Speaking. Study of interpretative reading. Discussion of 
problems and principles of oral reading. Practice in reading all types of 
literature, especially as found in the Scriptures. 

Juniors, spring term, 1 quarter hour credit. 

851. Radio Speaking. Discussion of the principles involved in the pre 
paration of radio speeches, sermons, interviews, and round tables. Practice 
in basic techniques of microphone presentation. 

Elective, 1 quarter hour credit. 

852. Radio Speaking, Continuation of Course No. 851, with study of radio 
speakers and religious broadcasts. Basic techniques of programing and use 
of the recorder. 

Elective, 1 quarter hour credit. 

854. Material for Public Speech. Requirements, methods of presentation, 
mannerisms. PubHc Reading, introducing a speaker, after'dinner speaking, 
parliamentary procedure. This course is only supplementary to the work of 
this department. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 39 

THE GRADUATE DEPARTMENT 

The Degree offered: The degree of Master of Theology 
(Th.M.) is granted to those candidates who fulfill the necessary 
requirements, as listed below. This is an earned professional 
degree indicating advanced study and proficiency in theological 
subjects. 

Entrance Requirements: Every applicant for admission to 
the Graduate Department must make application on the form pro- 
vided for that purpose, and must present the following credentials: 
(1) A letter from the clerk of his presbytery, or corresponding 
church officer, indicating that he is a member in good standing of 
some evangelical church and is officially recommended as a student 
of theology; (2) complete official transcripts of academic credits 
beyond high school, including evidence that he holds (a) the A.B. 
degree, or an equivalent degree, from an accredited college or uni- 
versity, and (b) the B.D. degree, or an equivalent degree, from this 
or some other accredited seminary or theological school; (3) sat- 
isfactory testimonials from at least three references in response 
to the Seminary's questionnaire. One or more of these require- 
ments may be waived in cases where adequate information is al- 
ready on file in the Seminary. Acceptance as a bona fide Grad- 
uate Student will be determined by the Faculty's Graduate Studies 
Committee on the basis of complete and satisfactory credentials. 

Fields of Study: At the initiation of his graduate work, the 
student must indicate the field in which he expects to do his 
major work. The following four fields are determined: (For 
available courses, see page 22.) 

I. Biblical Literature and Interpretation. 
II. History of Church and Doctrine. 
III. Christian Education and Philosophy. 
IV. Practical Theology and Administration. 

Graduation Requirements: A total of 34 quarter hour credits 
is required for the Master's degree, 27 credits being allowed for 
the required classroom work and 7 credits for an acceptable 
thesis. Of the 27 hours of classroom work, 18 quarter hours must 
be taken in the student's major field. The remaining 9 quarter 
hours may be elected by the student in any of the other fields. 
The class work calls for a minimum of one academic year of three 
quarters, of not less than 9 quarter hours each. The equivalent 
hours may be spread out, but the total period involved must not 



40 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 

exceed three academic years except by special action of the Grad- 
uate Studies Committee of the Faculty. 

Thesis Requirements: The required thesis is to be written 
upon some subject related to the student's work in his major 
field. This subject, together with a provisional outline and a basic 
bibliography for the thesis, must be approved by the professor 
under whom the student is doing his major work. Notification of 
final decision in these matters is to be made to the Graduate Studies 
Committee not later than November 1st preceding the May Com- 
mencement at which the student anticipates receiving his degree. 
The student will arrange with his major professor for a rmnhniim 
of three consultations while the thesis is in process of preparation. 
The number of these required consultations may be increased at 
the discretion of the professor concerned. 

Two copies of the finished thesis (one of which may be a 
first carbon) must be delivered to the Graduate Studies Committee 
at least two calendar months prior to the May Commencement at 
which the student expects to receive his degree. For this purpose 
they should be bound in substantial temporary binders. Upon 
final approval by the Graduate Studies Committee, these two 
copies will be permanently bound by the Seminary Library, the 
expense thereof being wholly chargeable to the student. If the 
student desires to keep a copy of his thesis for himself, he should 
so provide. 

Credits Trans jerable from other Schools: Credits for graduate 
courses taken in other theological schools or seminaries are trans- 
ferable toward the Th.M. degree, subject to the final approval of 
the Graduate Studies Committee in each individual instance; 
but such transferred credits cannot exceed 9 quarter hours in 
value. It is in all cases necessary, therefore, that a minimum of 
25 quarter hours be earned in residence. 

Time Limit: Under normal conditions, and except by special 
action of the Graduate Studies Committee to the contrary, all 
work for the degree inclusive of the thesis must be completed 
within four calendar years from the date of the student's matricu- 
lation in the Graduate Department. 

Expenses: Students will, of course, be expected to purchase 
any textbooks which their professors may require. 

The following fees and tuitions are charged to graduate 
students, both as candidates for degrees, and as auditors in the 
seminary: 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 41 



(1) Graduate Matriculation Fee, payable upon entrance . $ 5.00 

(2) Regular Tuition Fee, payable upon registration for 
each quarter as follows: 

(a) For 3 courses (9 quarter hours) .... 10.00 

(b) For 2 courses (6 quarter hours) .... 8.00 

(c) For 1 course (3 quarter hours) .... 5.00 

(3) Diploma Fee, payable 15 days prior to granting the degree 5.00 

Note: Graduate fees, excepting the diploma fee, are applied in building 
up the Graduate Section of the Library, and in the purchase of other Grad' 
uate Department supplies and equipment. 

Communications: Additional information relative to the work of the 
Graduate Department, together with forms for Application for Admission, 
may be secured by addressing: 

The Department of Graduate Studies 

The Pitts bur gh-X.enia Theological Seminary 

616 West North Avenue, Pittsburgh 12, Pa. 



SUMMER INSTITUTES OF THEOLOGY 
During the summer of 1946 the Seminary-sponsored Summer 
Institutes of Theology were inaugurated, the first being held on 
the campus of Westminster College, New Wilmington, Pa., and 
the second on Monmouth College campus, Monmouth, Illinois. 
Both institutes received a warm welcome from the Church's re- 
turning chaplains and from her regular ministry. Nineteen re- 
turned chaplains took advantage of the New Wilmington Insti- 
tute that first summer; a slightly smaller number were in at- 
tendance at Monmouth. In 1948 the Midwest Institute was 
moved to the Sterling campus in Kansas. 

The two institutes will be available to our ministry again in 
1950, at New Wilmington, Pa., June 5-9, and at Sterling, Kan- 
sas, June 19-23. Well-known Christian leaders from other denom- 
inations will serve as guest lecturers, thus augmenting the regular 
Faculty of the Seminary on the teaching staffs of both institutes. 
In the congenial atmosphere of our college campuses, with 
lodging in comfortable dormitory quarters, an ideal recreational 
week is provided for our ministers at a very nominal cost. Here 
they renew old friendships with college and seminary classmates. 
Here they receive inspiration through guided Bible study, lec- 
tures on preaching and pastoral work, and discussion in the 
various fields of theology. Here are found mental and spiritual 
stimulation and fresh ideas for both homiletic and pastoral work, 
as men come to grips with the problems of the Church in our con- 
temporary world. Physical, intellectual, and spiritual refresh- 
ment is the goal of the institutes. 



42 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



AFFILIATION WITH THE UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 

Graduates from the three-year course of PIttsburgh-Xenia 
Theological Seminary who desire to take the A.M. degree at the 
University of Pittsburgh in the field of Religion and Religious 
Education may transfer as many as 14 semester credits (equiva- 
lent to 21 quarter hours) from the Seminary as advanced standing 
toward this degree. The remaining ten course credits and six 
thesis credits required for the A.M. degree must be taken at the 
University of Pittsburgh. A part of the ten course credits may 
be taken in other fields of the University than Religion and Re- 
ligious Education. 

Graduates of Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary will be 
allowed a maximum of 30 graduate credits (equivalent to 45 
quarter hours) as advanced standing toward the Ph.D. degree in 
Religion and Religious Education. An additional amount of 
six graduate credits may be granted to students taking courses 
at the Seminary beyond the regular three-year theological course, 
in which cases the courses must be agreed upon by the Graduate 
School of the University of Pittsburgh. 

The University of Pittsburgh will accept graduate credits from 
Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary in the fields of Biblical 
Literature, Church History, Theology, History and Philosophy of 
Religion, and Religious Education. 

The amount of advanced graduate standing granted to Semi- 
nary students who choose to do their major work at the University 
in fields other than Religion and Religious Education will be de- 
termined by heads of these departments. The advanced standing 
for both the A.M. and Ph.D. degree will vary some with depart- 
ments and students. 

A regular summer session or semester must elapse between the 
time of the student's graduation from the Seminary and the con- 
ferring of a graduate degree by the University of Pittsburgh. 

The procedure outlined in the foregoing paragraphs became 
effective February, 1933. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 43 



THE DEPARTMENT OF CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

The Department of Christian Education opened with the Fall 
Term of 1947, as an expansion of the Department of Philosophy 
of Religion and Religious Education. Approved by the General 
Assembly of the United Presbyterian Church the preceding May, 
this Department was inaugurated to meet the growing need in our 
Church for trained lay leaders. 

The Purpose of the Department is to instruct young people, 
dedicated to full-time Christian service, in the knowledge of the 
doctrines and order of worship taught in the Scriptures and set 
forth in the standards of the United Presbyterian Church of North 
America; to assist them to grow in the Christian faith and life 
and to acquire the technical skill necessary for effective service 
in the Name and Spirit of Christ. 

Its Particular Field is the education of young women for 
church vocations as non-ministerial, professional lay workers. It 
does not enter the field of the Seminary proper in preparing 
young men for ordination. 

The Program of Training covers a period of two academic 
years, each of which is divided into three terms, or "quarters," of 
eleven weeks each. The annual session begins the second Wednes- 
day of September and continues thirty-five weeks including holi- 
days. 

Preparation for Entrance. Prospective students are urged 
to give careful attention during their college days to the Pre- 
Seminary Studies approved by the American Association of Theo- 
logical Schools and described on page 13 of this catalogue. It 
is also recommended that all applicants for entrance should qual- 
ify as good typists and pianists: for such technical skill is invalu- 
able in the field of Christian Education. 



44 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 

Academic Regulations. Except in so far as expressly modi- 
fied, the Academic Regulations of the Seminary proper apply 
also to the Department of Christian Education. 

Admission. The normal time for entrance is at the beginning 
of the annual session in September, Application for admission 
should be made well in advance, on the official form, which may be 
secured from the Registrar's office. Each application should be 
accompanied by a small recent photograph of the applicant, to- 
gether with a statement of personal reasons for entering Christian 
work; and should be followed promptly by the credentials men- 
tioned below. 

Credentials. The following credentials will be required of 
each applicant for admission to the Department of Christian 
Education: 1) A Letter of Introduction from Pastor, or Session, 
testifying to Christian character, active church membership, and 
general fitness for Christian service; 2) A Letter from the Clerk 
of Presbytery, or corresponding church officer, indicating official 
acceptance as a candidate for Christian service and recommenda- 
tion as a student in the Department of Christian Education; (ap- 
plicant consult pastor as to the proper procedure); 3) Complete 
official Transcript of Academic Credits, beginning with high 
school record unless the applicant has completed two or more years 
of college work; (the degree of A.B., or an equivalent degree, 
from an accredited college or university, is required for admission) ; 
4) Satisfactory Testimonials from at least three personal refer- 
ences as indicated on the application blank. 

Classification of Students. In the two-year program of train- 
ing, regular degree students are classed as Juniors during their 
first year, and as Seniors during their second year. 

Field Work. A limited amount of Field Work, — not more 
than 10 hours per week and not less than 4 hours per week, — will 
be required of all regular degree students during both their Junior 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 45 

and Senior years. The academic value of this work, together with 
the correlated class work, is recognized In the form of 6 quarter 
hour credits applicable toward the degree. 

The Degree of Master of Religious Education will be con- 
ferred by the Seminary upon all who complete the course of study 
and training described on the following pages and therein meet 
all the requirements of the Faculty. At least one year of work 
In residence is necessary for graduation. The successful candidate 
must earn a minimum of 94 quarter hour credits and maintain 
more than average standing throughout their course. 

Financing the Course. In matters of expense and aid, stu- 
dents In the Department of Christian Education attend on the 
same basis as regular students in the Undergraduate Department 
of the Seminary. There Is no charge for tuition, or for room rent 
except in the case of married students with families. For the 
usual academic fees, an estimate of personal expenses, and the 
amount of aid to be expected from the Board of Christian Educa- 
tion, see page 59. 



46 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



CURRICULUM OF CHRISTIAN EDUCATION IN OUTLINE 



Junior Yeas 


Senior Year 


Fall Term 


Qr. 

Hrs. 


Fall Term 


Qr. 
Hrs. 


911 Christian Educa. of Children 


3 


921 Christian Educa. of Adolescents 


3 


914 Thesis Research 


1 


924 Church Drama (Given with 201) 


2 


917 Field Work Practicum 


1 


927 Field Work Practicum 


1 


217 Biblical Interpretation 


3 


201 Church Art 


1 


301 Survey of English Bible 


3 


321 Poetical Books 


3 


621 Christian Education 


3 


431 Christian Missions 


3 


811 Public Speaking (or 811A) 


1 


— Elective 


3 




IS 

Qr. 

Hrs. 




16 


Winter Term 


Winter Term 


Qr. 
Hrs. 


912 Worship and Music 


3 


925 Thesis 


3 


918 Field Work Practicum 


1 


928 Field Work Practicum 


1 


102 Geography of Bible Lands 


3 


332 Eighth Century Prophets 


3 


312 The Gospels 


3 


402 Survey of Church History 


3 


502 Survey of Theology 


3 


757 Personal Evangelism 


3 


655 Building a Church Program 


3 


— • Elective 


3 




16 




16 




Qr. 




Qr. 


Spring Term 


Hrs. 


Spring Term 


Hrs. 


913 Christian Education of Adults 


3 


926 Thesis 


3 


919 Field Work Practicum 


1 


929 Field Work Practicum 


1 


103 Survey of 0. T. History 


3 


434 Church Government 


2 


203 Survey of N. T. Introduction 


3 


533 Apologetics 


3 


313 The Life of Christ 


3 


— • Electives 


6 


— • Elective 


3 




IS 




16 


Total Quarter Credit Hours 


94 



Note: Typing^ and Piano will be provided for those students who are not pro- 
ficient in them. 

Required courses are described on the following pages. 

Elective courses are described in the Curriculum of the Undergraduate 

Department. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 47 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

Professor Jackson Miss Lewis 

621. Christian Education. A basic course in the philosophy of Christian 
education. After a study of the history, principles, and presuppositions of 
Christian education, attention is centered upon problems within the modern 
church. 

Juniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. Prof. Jackson 

655. Building a Church Program,. The concern is to construct a church 
program around Worship, Study, Fellowship, Evangelism, and Administra' 
tion; to see the program whole; and to deal with problematical situations. 

Juniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. Prof. Jackson 

911. Christian Education of Children. A study of the total Christian 
Education Program for Children from Pre'School through the Junior De- 
partment. Methods, Materials, and Organization for teaching the Christian 
Religion to children are stressed. Introduced by a background study of the 
psychological developments of the child and his correlated reHgious needs. 
(Alternates with No. 921). 

Juniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. Miss Lewis 

912. Worship and Music. A practical course dealing with the elements 
of public worship. It includes an outline of the historical background of 
worship; emphasis on the importance of music to worship and the selection of 
hymns and Scripture; and practice in developing and leading worship, both 
formal and informal. Special reference to plans and programs for Church 
School. 

Juniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. Miss Lewis 

913. Christian Education of Adults. A study of the Church's program 
for Adults, with emphasis on adult needs and problems, and methods that 
will meet those needs. Discussion on the Church and the Home, and Parent 
Education. 

Juniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. Miss Lewis 

914. Thesis Research. This course is designed to acquaint the first 
year class with the various types of educational research and to prepare each 
student to do creditable research in the field selected for specific study. 
(Prerequisite to Thesis credit). 

Juniors, fall term, 1 quarter hour credit. Miss Lewis 

917, 918, 919. Field Work Practicum. A class forum based on field work 
problems and the practical application of classroom teaching. Credit for 
these courses is given at the end of the school year upon the successful com' 
pletion of the Field Work, required written reports, and regular conferences. 

Juniors, fall, winter and spring; 1 quarter hour credit each term. Miss Lewis 



r 



48 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



921. Christian Education of Adolescents. A look at the Adolescent, — 
his psychological background and his religious needs, — and a study of the 
available material and methods for use with youth groups. (Alternates with 
No. 911). 

Seniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. Miss Lewis 

924. Church Drama. A course in the use of Drama in the Christian Ed' 
ucation program. The work includes discussion of the problems of produc 
tion, and practice in directing, acting, and stage make'Up. (Given with 
No. 201). 

Seniors, fall term, 2 quarter hours credit. Miss Lewis 

925, 926. Thesis for Degree of M. R. E. The satisfactory completion 
of a research project is one of the requirements for the Degree of Master 
of Religious Education. The subject and tentative outline of the thesis must 
be officially approved not later than April 1st of the first year of residence. 
Regularly scheduled conferences with the advisor are required during the 
progress of this research. The completed thesis must be turned in not later 
than March 1st preceding the granting of the degree. Two bound type' 
written copies of the thesis must be deposited in the Seminary Library at 
least two weeks before the date of graduation. 

Seniors, winter and spring; 3 quarter hours credit each term. Miss Lewis 

927, 928, 929. Field Work Seminar. Second year forum on the practical 
application of the principles taught. Discussion of practical points in Church 
Office Administration, with special attention to records and the use of the 
mimeograph; followed by discussion of leadership, professional ethics and 
the social requirements of the profession. 

Seniors, fall, winter and spring; 1 quarter hour credit each term. Miss Lewis 

951. The Use of the Bible with Youth. A laboratory course in Bible 
Study; experimentation with and analysis of various methods of Bible teach' 
ing; an opportunity for creative study from the viewpoint of both student 
and teacher. 

Elective, 3 quarter hours credit. Miss Lewis 



Courses in the Curriculum of Christian Education 
given by other Professors 

^ 102. Geography of Bible Lands. A survey course correlating the major 
geographical features of the ancient orient with BibHcal history, and dealing 
more fully with the geography of Palestine in relation to the history, cus' 
toms and manners of its peoples. 

Juniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Kelso 

103. Survey of Old Testament History. A study of the history of the 
Hebrews from the days of Abraham to the close of the Old Testament, with 
special emphasis on the more significant personalities, events, and institu- 
tions. Relevant archaeological data are studied in conjunction with the 
Biblical record. 

Juniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Kelso 




o 

W 

CO 

Ui 
O 



Z 

o 

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U 

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The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 49 



201. Church Art. (a) A rapid survey of the development of the Chris' 
tian church building with elucidation of those features which became pecu' 
liarly characteristic of Christian architecture. (b) A brief introduction to 
Christian Symbology. (c) A rapid survey of Christian painting and decor- 
ation from the catacomb murals to the Renaissance. (Given with No. 924). 

Seniors, fall term, 1 quarter hour credit. Dr. Taylor 

203. Survey of New Testament Introduction, (a) The Graeco'Roman 
World as a setting for the New Testament literature, (b) The development 
and content of the New Testament literature: i) the Pauline letters, ii) the 
Gospels and the Acts, iii) the other Epistles, iv) the Revelation. Brief 
treatment will be accorded the Synoptic and Johannine problems and Chris' 
tian apocalyptic. 

Juniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Taylor 

217. Biblical Interpretation, (a) The Oriental Mind: Jesus was an Ori- 
ental, Who ministered and preached to Orientals. Adequate interpretation 
of Scripture, therefore, demands an understanding of Oriental, and particularly 
Semitic, psychology and logic. A study is made of them, using the Scrip- 
tures and contemporary literature, together with experiences from modern 
Oriental life, for documentation. Lectures, readings, and discussion. (b) 
Hermeneutics proper: A review of the history of interpretation in the Church, 
with a determination of the principles of sound exegesis as exemplified in the 
grammatico-historical method. Lectures and discussion. 

Juniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Taylor 

301. Survey of the English Bible. This course will include (a) an intro- 
duction to the English Bible designed to give the student a working knowl- 
edge of the Book by examining the diversity and interrelation of constituent 
parts and the contribution each makes to the whole; and (b) a study of the 
history of the English Bible, in which will be reviewed the early manuscript 
versions, Jerome and the Vulgate, Wyclif, Tyndale and Coverdale, the Rheims 
and Douay Bibles, the King James Version and its influence on British and 
American history, the British and American Revisions, and modern versions. 

Juniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Long 

312. The Gospels. There will be literary and historical study of the 
Gospels, covering their general features, a survey of their content and the 
relation of the Synoptics to the Fourth Gospel. Critical questions in con- 
nection with the Gospels will be studied in Course No. 221. 

Juniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Long 

313. The Life of Christ. The Life of Christ will be studied on the basis 
of the materials contained in the Gospels, — His birth, baptism, temptation, 
self-consciousness, teachings, miraculous activity, crucifixion, resurrection 
and ascension. 

Juniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Long 

321. The Poetical Books. This course is designed to provide (a) a general 
introduction to the poetry and wisdom writings of the ancient Hebrews; (b) 
a comprehensive survey of the Psalter; and (c) an analysis of Job, Eccle- 
siastes and the Song of Songs. 

Seniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Long 



50 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



332. The Eighth Century Prophets. There will be (a) a general survey 
of prophetism in Israel, its origin and development from earliest times to the 
time of the canonical prophets; (b) historical introduction to the Prophets 
of the Eighth Century, B.C.; and (c) a detailed study of Amos, Hosea, 
Micah and Isaiah. Attention will be given to the social ethics of these 
prophecies and their bearings on contemporary life. 

Seniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. Prof. Jackson 

402. Survey of Church History. A rapid review of the History of the 
Church dealing with persons, events, and movements of outstanding im- 
portance from the time of the Apostles to the present day. 

Seniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Gerstner 

431. Christian Missions. A survey of the progress of missions from the 
Apostolic days, with special emphasis on the modern missionary movement, 
beginning with William Carey. An examination of the principal mission 
fields, including those of the United Presbyterian Church. Missions in 
America. Lives of outstanding missionaries in various fields. The problems, 
methods, and opportunities of mission work. Methods of missionary in' 
struction in congregations. 

Seniors, fall term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Gerstner 

434. Church Government. Discussion method. Principles and forms 
of church government; government and discipline of the United Presbyterian 
Church; church courts; practical workings of church law. 

Seniors, spring term, 2 quarter hours credit. Dr. Gerstner 

502. Survey of Theology. By class room lectures supplemented by out' 
side reading, the great articles of our faith are brought under review with 
intent to give the student an intelligent grasp of the Christian system of 
thought. The treatment throughout is positive, doctrine being grounded in 
Scripture and evaluated in terms of Christian faith and life. 

Juniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Leitch 

533. Apologetics. The development and defense of Christianity, in which 
a survey is made of the old arguments against the Christian faith and the 
classical defenses which have been built up across the centuries. Special inter' 
est centers on the modern apologia for our faith. 

Seniors, spring term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Leitch 

757. Personal Evangelism. The primary aim of the Church is evangelism. 
This course deals first with the history of evangelism in general, and then 
with the modern renaissance of lay visitation evangelism. It aims to prepare 
the student for the work of organizing and carrying through a program of 
visitation evangelism through the Church or the Bible School. 

Seniors, winter term, 3 quarter hours credit. Dr. Shear 

811. Public Speaking, or 

811 A. Advanced Public Speaking, as may be indicated by the needs of the 
individual student. (See page 38.) 

Juniors, fall term, 1 quarter hour credit. Prof. Barbe 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 51 



FACILITIES FOR STUDY 



THE SEMINARY LIBRARY 

The Seminary Library comprising over 45,000 volumes is 
adequately housed within the Seminary building. The library 
facilities were completely renovated and modernized when the 
Pittsburgh and Xenia Seminaries were merged in 1930. The Main 
Reference Room, immediately to the left as one enters the build- 
ing, was furnished with the most up-to-date equipment by the 
Sixth United Presbyterian Church of Pittsburgh as an expression 
of its continuing interest in the Seminary. Significant panels, in 
which the artist has portrayed the historic insignia of the older 
Presbyterian and Reformed Churches of the world, decorate the 
upper walls of the room, reminding the student of his ecclesias- 
tical heritage. There is also the Periodical Room where the finest 
current magazines of popular and general Christian interest are 
to be found, while the more technical theological and Biblical 
journals are available in the Main Reference Room. There are 
also ample stack rooms with steel shelving and a commodious 
vault for rare and historic books and documents. 

An increasingly large investment in both new and older out- 
of-print books is being made by the Seminary each year. A 
Booklist of the year's accessions is published annually in May. 
Gifts of both books and money from the many friends of the 
Seminary are received annually and are very greatly appreciated. 

The Newburgh Collection 

The research department of the Library contains the now 
priceless collection of classic theological works, many of which 
date from the early days of printing and from the Reformation, 
which were secured abroad by the Rev. John M. Mason, D.D., in 
connection with the founding of the Seminary of New York, after- 
wards the Newburgh Seminary. 

The James Law Library Fund 

Through the liberality of the late James Law, Esq., of Shus- 
han, N. Y,, there was conveyed to the Seminary several years ago 
the sum of ^15,000, to be employed as a library endowment. The 
'nterest from this sum augments annual purchases. 



52 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



The Nina S. Brittain Collection 

Through the generosity of Frank J. Brittain, Esq., of Erie, 
Pennsylvania, the sum of $5,000 is to be used over a period of 
years for the direct purchase of theological and related works. These 
books are known as the Nina S. Brittain Collection. 

Library Hours 

The Library is open week days to all, without restriction of 
creed, subject to the same rules as those which apply to students. 
The hours are 9 A.M. to 1 P.M., and 2 to 5:30 P.M., excepting 
Saturday when the closing hour is 12 noon. When the Seminary 
is in session the Library is also open evenings, Monday through 
Friday, from 7 to 10 P.M. 

THE BIBLE LANDS MUSEUM 

The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary is one of the 
most active seminaries in the world engaged in archaeological 
research of Bible times in ancient Palestine. In conjunction with 
the American School of Oriental Research at Jerusalem, it has 
conducted explorations at Sodom and Gomorrah in 1924, excava- 
tions at Kirjath-Sepher in 1926, 1928, 1930, 1932, and excava- 
tions at Bethel in 1934. 

This work was inaugurated by the late Dr. M. G. Kyle, 
formerly Professor of Biblical Archaeology, who served as presi- 
dent of all these expeditions with the exception of the last: it 
was conducted after his death as a memorial to his work in 
Palestinian archaeology. The share of these antiquities which 
the Palestinian Archaeological Museum has allotted to the Semi- 
nary has been shipped to Pittsburgh, where more than a thousand 
of these objects are now on exhibit. Numerous other valuable 
pieces are awaiting special preparation before being placed on 
exhibition. 

These objects all Illustrate In the most striking way the life 
of the people of Bible Lands, and so become of great value for 
interpretation as well as for apologetics. They illumine and 
corroborate the Biblical narratives. Thus an Ineffaceable impres- 
sion is made upon the student of the trustworthiness of the Biblical 
record, for only real events leave anything to be dug up out of the 
ground. The objects In the Museum are used constantly in the 
classes of the Seminary. Opportunity Is also afforded the public 
to visit the Museum at appointed times. 

Special gifts of archaeological specimens are being constantly 
added to the Museum through interested friends. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary S3 



CULTURAL ADVANTAGES 



THE DENOMINATIONAL SEMINARY 
The denominational Seminary has peculiar advantages. Being 
under direct church control, It certifies its graduates as trained by 
thoroughly responsible teachers. The established standards are 
maintained, and approved educational methods are followed. 
Without dwarfing Individuality, the church school gives to its 
graduates the unique stamp which wins recognition within denomi- 
national bounds. At the same time, the commingling of students 
from various evangelical bodies tends to develop in them a mu- 
tual understanding and brotherly regard. The wide range of ac- 
quaintance with the Church and its leaders secured by attendance 
at the Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary is also for the student an asset 
of great value. 

A METROPOLITAN ENVIRONMENT 

Pittsburgh has numerous elements of cultural value, chief 
among which are her schools and churches. The church life of our 
own and other denominations in Pittsburgh is of the best. The city 
and its environs, Including more than eighty of our own congrega- 
tions, afford an excellent example of the Church at work. In all 
the denominations the religious thought Is conservative and the 
methods of work progressive. The pulpits are well manned and 
the work generally well organized. Some of the ablest preachers 
of our own and other churches are located here. The student has 
opportunity to study the methods of men who are widely known 
as successful ministers. He may see mission work carried on along 
improved lines, and engage in It himself. He may study at first 
hand the most effective methods of Sabbath-school and Young 
People's work. He is welcomed to the weekly meetings of the 
local ministerial unions, where live problems and issues are the 
subjects of discussion. 

Pittsburgh is one of the strongest centers of Presbyterianism 
in the world. In the city and its immediate environs are more than 
250 congregations of the Presbyterian and Reformed family of 
churches, comprising more than 120,000 communicants. In the 
metropolitan area are to be found several of Presbyterianism's 
most influential pulpits; and many of the finest and most pro- 
gressive rural parishes are within easy driving distance of the city. 



54 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 

Pittsburgh, together with the contiguous towns, is one of the 
great commercial centers of the world. It affords unexcelled oppor- 
tunities for the study of social, economical, political, racial, and 
other problems. It is in itself an education to live and work in such 
a city and catch the pulse of its busy life. Moreover, the benefit 
of contact with those engaged in the varied forms of work for social, 
moral and religious betterment, and of personal experience in such 
efforts is evident to all. 

THE ALLEGHENY OBSERVATORY 
The Observatory is one of the oldest astronomical institutions 
in the country. It is affiliated with the University of Pittsburgh, 
but is located in Riverview Park, one of the highest points in 
Allegheny County. By special arrangements with the Director, 
the students of the Seminary have free access to it and the privilege 
of observing the heavens through its famous lenses. The stellar 
photographs are thrown on the screen, and these and the instru- 
ments and their workings explained to the students. 

THE BUHL PLANETARIUM 
Of the five planetaria in America, Pittsburgh now claims the 
finest and most up-to-date. Provided by the Buhl Foundation at 
a cost of over a million dollars, the Buhl Planetarium and Institute 
of Popular Science is located between the Post Office and the 
Carnegie Library, North Side, within a few minutes' walk of the 
Seminary. Its most distinctive feature is the Theatre of the Stars 
under the large dome which crowns the building. Here, by means 
of the intricate Zeiss projector, the lecturer can give to 450 visitors 
at once a realistic view of the heavens as they appear from any 
part of the earth at any time. In addition to the central auditor- 
ium, there are six galleries for scientific exhibits in which the 
various achievements of science are vividly set forth. A lecture 
hall, seating 250, has modern equipment for sound-motion pic- 
tures, lantern slides and demonstration experiments. Four well- 
equipped work rooms are provided for the Amateur Astronomers' 
Association of Pittsburgh. Fall, winter, and spring short-term 
evening classes in science are ofTered for laymen. High School 
Science Demonstration Lectures, the School Science Fair, Junior 
High School Conducted Tours, and the Congress for Science Stu- 
dents, are some of the school activities provided by the Planetar- 
ium. Mr. Arthur L. Draper is the Director of this unique insti- 
tution of education and culture. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 55 



LIFE AT THE SEMINARY 



THE SEMINARY BUILDING 

The Seminary hall is located at the corner of North Avenue 
and Buena Vista Street, and overlooks West Park. On the first 
floor are the Mary J. Stevenson Reception Room, the President's 
Office, the Pressly Chapel, the Library, the Reference and Reading 
Rooms, and the Gymnasium. On the second floor are the Faculty 
Conference Room, the Bible Lands Museum, and five classrooms 
of ample proportions. The third, fourth and fifth floors are 
given over to dormitory uses. The dining room and kitchen are 
on the fifth floor. 



ACCOMMODATIONS FOR UNMARRIED MEN 

The dormitory rooms are arranged as follows: there are single 
rooms; suites of double rooms, in which two men occupy a study 
and a bedroom in common; and suites of three rooms, in which 
two men have a study in common and two single bedrooms ad- 
joining. There is a trunk room on the third floor. Each floor has 
bathrooms and lavatories. The Seminary provides furniture and 
bedding, including sheets, pillow cases, and one blanket for each 
bed. Students should bring extra blankets for their own use. 
Students will also furnish towels for their own use and provide 
for the laundering of these. All other dormitory laundry work 
will be looked after by the Seminary. 

With the purpose of contributing to the comfort and health 
of the students, the oversight and maintenance of the rooms in the 
dormitory are placed in charge of a Committee of women appointed 
by the Board of Directors. Rooms are inspected from time to 
time. The ordinary supervision and control of the dormitory 
is committed to the President's Secretary. 

Rooms are provided free of charge to students who take not 
less than twelve hours of concurrent Seminary work. Rooms 
are assigned by the President's Secretary, reasonable consider- 
ation being given to the student's preference and to the date of 
his application for living quarters. 



56 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



APARTMENTS FOR MARRIED STUDENTS 

The upper floors of the Seminary building contain several 
two and three-room apartments which are available at a nominal 
charge to married students without children. Heat and light are 
supplied, but there are no individual cooking facilities. Men and 
their wives are, therefore, required to take their meals with the 
Student Eating Club which is located on the same floor. For men 
with children, the two stone buildings immediately adjacent to 
the Seminary on North Avenue are now available. In these build- 
ings, which have been completely remodeled into apartment struc- 
tures, the Seminary provides housekeeping accommodations for 
nine families at a nominal rental. Prospective students may re- 
quest that their names be placed upon the waiting list for either 
type of apartment, by addressing the Secretary to the President. 

ROOMS FOR YOUNG WOMEN 

Suitable housing for young women in the Department of 
Christian Education will be provided by the Seminary. 

GROUP INSURANCE 

Unmarried students In the dormitory and married students 
occupying Seminary apartments are protected against personal 
loss by fire in the amount of $300 and $500 respectively. A 
premium of $1.50 per single student and $2.25 per married stu- 
dent covers the cost for three years. This item Is Included in the 
Entrance Deposit. 

By arrangement with the Richard C. Knight Co. of Boston, 
Massachusetts, provision is made for hospital and medical care 
for single students. Blue Cross and Blue Shield are made avail- 
able for married students. 

THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF THE SEMINARY 

Adequate provision is made for the maintenance and develop- 
ment of the religious life. In addition to the private devotions of 
the men, there are various gatherings for social worship. Daily 
Chapel services are held under the direction of the Faculty. A 
Seminary Communion Service is held in the Pressly Chapel soon 
after the opening of the session in the fall; and a similar service, 
especially for the Senior Class, is held during commencement week. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 57 



The Day of Prayer for Educational Institutions is observed each 
year with appropriate exercises. "Family worship" is conducted 

by the students daily after the evening meal, and members 
of the student body take their turn in leading Chapel devotions 
in connection with their Chapel preaching service. The local 
group of volunteers for the mission fields does much to keep 
alive and active the missionary spirit. 

A meeting for prayer is held every night at ten o'clock. 



THE SOCIAL LIFE OF THE SEMINARY 

A social hour under the auspices of the Women's Dormitory 
Committee follows the Chapel service on the opening day of the 
Seminary year. Soon after the opening of the session, the Student 
Association arranges a reception for the new students. This is 
usually held in one of the local churches. Other social affairs are 
held at the option of the students during the year. The different 
congregations of the city invite the students to come to their 
socials and share their hospitality. 



THE WEBSTER MEMORIAL FORUM 

The Webster Memorial Forum is a student organization 
which meets at stated times for the discussion of pre-arranged 
subjects. It usually has a speaker whose address is correlated 
with open discussion. The organization originated in a desire on 
the part of the students for a closer fellowship between the student 
body and the Faculty. Dr. John Hunter Webster, formerly Profes- 
sor of New Testament Language and Literature, was asked to 
sponsor this Forum. After his death in 1933, the organization 
called itself the "Webster Memorial Forum" in honor of the one 
who had given substantial help to the students in their initial 
problems and discussions. 



MUSICAL OPPORTUNITY 

Pittsburgh is one of the major musical centers of America, 
having its own famed Symphony Orchestra, and such singing 
groups as the Mendelssohn Choir, the Bach Choir, and the Opera 



58 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



Society. Interested Seminary students who can pass entrance tests 
have been singing in these organizations for many years. 

Varying with the numbers and gifts of students in attendance, 
there has been a Chorus of Seminary men. In recent years, be- 
cause of the number of married students, a mixed chorus has been 
created and trained. The Seminary provides professional leader- 
ship for these chorus groups. 



PHYSICAL CULTURE 

The Allegheny Y. M. C. A. is located beside the Seminary. 
With its splendid physical equipment, — gymnasium, bowling 
alleys, showers, and swimming pool, — it offers a fine opportunity 
to the men of the Seminary, all of whom have free membership 

in it. The Seminary has organized teams in basketball and vol- 
leyball. In the city near the Seminary, there is opportunity for 
tennis, softball, and touch football. 



EXPENSES 

Rooms and accommodations provided by the Seminary, and 
the terms on which they are available, are discussed on pages 
55 and 56. Students who elect private lodgings must meet their 
own rental expenses. 

A dining room, located on the fifth floor of the dormitory, 
offers student board at cost. Although much of the equipment 
has been provided by the Seminary, the dining room is under the 
administration of the student body, and is practically self-sup- 
porting. With a view to the proper maintenance of equipment 
and its gradual replacement as that becomes necessary, the Club 
is accumulating a special fund, known as the sinking fund, to 
which each member contributes ^6.00 a year. A limited number 
of students receive their board in compensation for their services 
as waiters. Bills are rendered monthly. An initial deposit of 
$35.00 is required of each student to defray the bills of the first 
month. The Club operates five and one-half days of each week, 
the average cost for such a week being $8.50 per member. The 
cost of food over the week ends is included in the following estimate. 



Student Expenses 


jSS.OO 


Books & Sup. . . $ 75.00 


5.00 


Student Association Fee . 3.00 


S.OO 


Board .... 385.00 


S.OO 


Incidentals . . 75.00-300.00 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 59 



All men rooming in the building are required to take their meals 
in the Seminary dining hall. 

The Board of Christian Education of the United Presbyterian 
Church, through its retail department, the United Presbyterian 
Book Store, allows students a reduction of twenty per cent on all 
books. The Board also grants reasonable credit to students under 
presbyterial supervision, where they are unable to make imme- 
diate payment. 



•Matriculation Fee 

*Entrance Deposit 

*Diploma Fee (Seniors) 

*Cap & Gown (Seniors) 

(* Items starred are required only once; all others represent estimated annual 
expenses.) 

Self-Support and Student Aid 

Students are urged and encouraged to maintain a maximum 
degree of financial independence. Self-reliance, rather than the 
expectation of special favors, is held up as the norm throughout 
life for servants of the Church as well as other members of society. 
However, for those students who find it impossible to finance all 
of their Seminary course, a modest amount of aid is available. 

The Board of Education Aid 

The General Assembly authorizes the presbyteries to recom- 
mend worthy students for grants from the Board of Education. 
The maximum authorized for 1949-1950 was as follows: $130 to 
students of the first year, $120 to second-year students, and $90 
to third-year students. These grants are made only to United 
Presbyterian students who attend this Seminary. 

Student Aid Fund 

There is a limited fund at the disposal of the Seminary for the 
assistance of needy students. This fund is provided for emergency 
cases only and is administered under the careful supervision of the 
Faculty. 



60 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 

THE STUDENT ASSOCIATION 
The Student Association is the official organization of the 
student body. Its constitution states that the purpose of the 
Association shall be to promote the spirit of unity, self-govern- 
ment, social and spiritual welfare of the students, and to main- 
tain a sympathetic understanding and close cooperation with 
the Faculty. The Student Board, the governing agency of the 
Association, is composed of the President of the Eating Club, 
the Secretary of the Preaching Association, a representative 
from each class, and a member at large. Dues of $3.00 a year 
are assessed to cover student activity. This association was form- 
ally organized in December, 1945. 

ASSOCIATION OFFICERS 

Seniors . ...... Kenneth Carey, President 

MIddlers ........ Robert Kelley, Treasurer 

Juniors ......... William Peters 

Dept. Christian Education ...... Lois Copeland 

Easting Club President ....... Edward Pitz 

Preaching Association ..... Byron Crozier, Secretary 

Member-at-large ........ Richard Braun 

CLASS PRESIDENTS 
Seniors ......... Kenneth Carey 

Middlers William McClelland 

Juniors .......... Robert Hinman 

Dept. Christian Education ....... Laura Small 

THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

All who have been enrolled as students of The Pittsburgh- 
Xenia Theological Seminary or its constituent institutions are en- 
titled to membership. The object of the Association is to cherish 
the memories of Seminary life, to maintain an active interest in 
Seminar}'- affairs, and to promote the welfare of the Seminary and 
the Church. A business meeting, followed by a social hour and 
banquet, is held each year in connection with the Commencement 
Exercises. The business meeting is held in the First Church, 
North Side, Pittsburgh, at 4:00 P. M. of Commencement Day. At 
this time the Association elects officers to serve for the ensuing 
year. The business meeting is followed by a social hour culminat- 
ing in the Alumni Banquet at 5:30 P. M. Alumni and friends of 
the Seminary are urged to attend. 

All members are requested to send to the Seminary Library 
copies of such books, pamphlets and important magazine articles 
as they may have published. 

The officers of the Alumni Association are: the Rev. S. W. 
Weir, D.D., President; the Rev. Wm. J. Grossman, Vice President; 
and the Rev. L. Roy Lash, D.D., Secretary. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 61 



AWARDS GRANTED, 1948-1949 

Degree of Master of Theology 

Robert Wallace Cummings Springfield, Mo. 

Westminster College, 1913 
Allegheny Seminary, 1918 
Mercer Presbytery 

Walter Edwin McCrory Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1934 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1937 

Monongahela Presbytery 

Mack Thaddeus Williams ....... Boston, Mass. 

A.B., Roger Williams University, 1920 

B.D., Graduate School of Theology, Oberlin, 1928 

Degree of Master of Religious Education 

EvLYN Wehling Fulton Bellevne, Pa. 

A.B., Pennsylvania College for Women, 1944 
B.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1946 

Allegheny Presbytery 

Alice Ruth Gabel West Allis, Wis. 

A.B., University of Illinois, 1945 
Wisconsin Presbytery 

Jean Elda Snodgrass New Castle, Pa. 

B.Sc. in Ed., Muskingum College, 1944 
Beaver Valley Presbytery 

Edith Margaretta Vorhis Coraopolis, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1946 
Monongahela Presbytery 

Degree of Bachelor of Divinity 

Eugene Hoopes Ammon (11/24/48) .... New Wilmington, Pa. 
B.S., Sterling College, 1941 
Mercer Presbytery 

Joseph Harold Anderson . Butler, Pa. 

B.B.A., Westminster College, 1946 
Butler Presbytery 

William Henry Anderson, Jr. Dover, N. J. 

A.B., Wheaton College, 1946 
New York Presbytery 

Russell Allen Arthur Cambridge, Ohio 

B.Sc, Ohio State University, 1941 
Allegheny Presbytery 

Kenneth Lloyd Beams Oneonta, N. Y. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1938 
Delaware Presbytery 

Gordon Earl Boak McDonald, Pa. 

B.S., Muskingum College, 1942 
Chartiera Presbytery 

Jay William Brewer Washington, Iowa 

B.S., Sterling College, 1944 
Keokuk Presbytery 



62 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 

WiLLARD Kyle George Youngstown, Ohio 

B.S., Westminster College, 1936 
Cleveland Presbytery 

Arsen Hachick Gulian Detroit, Mich. 

Deceased 5-25-49, Degree granted 11-49. 
A.B., University of Dubuque, 1946 
Detroit Presbytery 

Francis Bruce Johnston (11/24/48) . . . New Wilmington, Pa. 
A.B., Westminster College, 1941 
Mercer Presbytery 

Robert Lee Lanning, Jr. ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1942 
Monongahela Presbytery 

Harvey Milton Luce ........ Collyer, Kans. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1946 
Kansas City Presbytery 

James Gardiner McConnell ..... New York 10, N. Y. 
A.B., Monmouth College, 1946 
Monongahela Presbytery 

Leonard Arden McCulloch ....... Geneva, Ohio 

B.S., Monmouth College, 1939 
Cleveland Presbytery 

James Foster Reese Harrodsburg, Ky. 

B.S., Knoxvllle College, 1946 
Tennessee Presbytery 

Paul Harvey Sutton . . Donora, Pa. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1946 
Detroit Presbytery 

WiLMER Neil Thornburg McDonald, Pa. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1945 
Kansaa City Presbytery 

Peter van Lierop ........ Detroit, Mich. 

A.B., Hope College, 1946 
Detroit Presbytery 

Elmon Earl Ward ......... Romeo, Mich. 

A.B., Wheaton College, 1946 
Detroit Presbytery 

Degree of Bachelor of Theology 

Robert Wallace Cummings Springfield, Mo. 

Scholarships and Prizes 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship (not to exceed ^800) to Mr. Robert Lee 

Lanning, Jr. 
The Jane Hogg Gardner Scholarship (not to exceed $200) to Mr. Peter 

van Lierop. 
The Robert A. Lee Church History Award to Mr. Harvey Milton Luce. 
Graduation Honors: Magna Cum Laude to Mr. Robert Lee Lanning, Jr. 

Cum Laude to Mr. Russell Allen Arthur, Mr. Willard Kyle George, Mr. 

Harvey Milton Luce, and Mr. Peter van Lierop. Cum Laude to Evlyn 

Wehling Fulton and Edith Margaretta Vorhis. 
The James Purdy Scholarships (six In number, not to exceed $S0 each) to 

the following Juniors: Lloyd Allen Dalbey, James Robert Deemer, 

Theodore William Kalsbeek, Robert Lee Kelley, Jr., Dale Keith Milllgan, 

and James Herbert Patterson. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 63 

REGISTER OF STUDENTS, 1948-1949 

Senior Class 

William Bikle Anderson ........ Egypt 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1947 
Cleveland Presbytery 

Mark Hilton Caldwell . . . . ; . . . Houston, Pa. 
B.S., Sterling College, 1947 
Chartiers Presbytery 

Kenneth George Carey ........ Lenox, Iowa 

A.B., Tarkio College, 1939 
College Springs Presbytery 

Robert Merwin Jones ....... Floral Park, N. Y. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1947 
New York Presbytery 

Fulton Clark Kissick ...... New Wilmington, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1940 
Mercer Presbytery 

Russell Roy Lester Saxonburg, Pa. 

A.B, Grove City College, 1947 
Butlef Presbytery 

Samuel Robb McLaughlin (11/29/SO) ...... Egypt 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1945 
Monmouth Presbytery 

Carl Howard Noble Wheeling, W. Va. 

A.B., West Liberty College, 1948 
Monongahela Presbytery 

Thomas Lewis Patton, Jr. ....... New Castle, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1941 
Mercer Presbytery 

Edward James Pitz ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1947 
Monongahela Presbytery 

Paul Ray Pulliam Eureka, Calif. 

A.B., University of California, 1947 
Philadelphia Presbytery 

Kenneth Edward Rasmussen Jetmore, Kansas 

A.B., Sterling College, 1945 
Arkansas Valley Presbytery 

Howard Eugene Rosebaugh ....... Mars, Pa. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1947 
Allegheny Presbytery 

Murray Henry Russell (11/29/50) Ethiopia 

A.B., Seattle Pacific College, 1947 
Puget Sound Presbytery 

James Ralston Shott ........ Oakmont, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1947 
Monongahela Presbytery 



64 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



Clarence Leroy Thomas 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1947 
Muskingum Presbytery 

Edmond Irving Watkins 

A.B., Sterling College, 1947 
Detroit Presbytery 



Akron, Ohio 



Drayton Plains, Mich. 



Middle Class 

James Arthur Adair ...... Anglo-Egyptian Sudan 

A.B., Sterling College, 1948 
Arkansas Valley Presbytery 

Richard Waldo Braun Parkston, S. D. 

A.B., Dakota Wesleyan University, 1947 
Monongahela Presbytery 

William Earl Butler St. Louis, Mo. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1948 
Illinois Southern Presbytery 

David Armstrong Campbell Alliance, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1948 
Cleveland Presbytery 

Kenneth Howard Campbell ...... Monroe, Ohio 

A.B., Sterling College, 1948 
First Ohio Presbytery 

Jack Claude Carr . Des Moines, Iowa 

A.B., Sterling College, 1947 
Des Moines Presbytery 

John Carson Cogley Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Taylor University, 1946 

Pittsburgh Conference, The Methodist Church 

James Corry, Jr. . . . ..... Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1948 
Monongahela Presbytery 

Robert Byron Crozier Altoona, Pa. 

A.B., Wheaton College, 1948 
Chartiers Presbytery 

Lloyd Allen Dalbey Youngstown, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1948 
Cleveland Presbytery 

James Robert Deemer McKees Rocks, Pa. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1948 
Monongahela Presbytery 

James Edwin Eddy . Waterloo, Iowa 

B.S., Sterling College, 1949 
Cedar Rapids Presbytery 

Frank Abrams Erwin ....... Adena, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1948 
Steubenville Presbytery 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



65 



James Leroy Evans Tyrone, Pa. 

A.B., Geneva College, 1948 

Western Pennsylvania, Christian & Missionary Alliance 

Edward Charles Fish Elcho, Wis. 

B.S., Sterling College, 1948 

Wisconsin Conference, The Congregational Church 

John Milton Hinerman New Waterford, Ohio 

A.B., Asbury College, 1948 

Northeast Ohio Conference, Methodist Church 

Delbert Wayne Icenogle ...... Monmouth, Illinois 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1947 
Monmouth Presbytery 

Theodore William Kalsbeek Liberty, Ind 

A.B., Earlham College, 1948 
First Ohio Presbytery 

Robert Lee Kelley, Jr. ...... Mt. Lebanon, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1948 
Monongahela Presbytery 

Harold Edward Kurtz ........ Nyssa, Ore. 

B.S., Monmouth College, 1948 
Idaho Presbytery 

Harold Julius Larson Victor, Colo. 

A.B, Sterling College, 1948 
Arkansas Valley Presbytery 

John Graham Lorimer Beaver Falls, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1945 
Beaver Valley Presbytery 

W. Ralph Lufkin Cambridge, N. Y. 

A.B., Westminster College. 1948 
Argyle Presbytery 

William Lester McClelland New Castle, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1948 
Beaver Valley Presbytery 

James Charles Miller Akron, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1948 
Cleveland Presbytery 

Dale Keith Milligan Des Moines, Iowa 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1948 
Des Moines Presbytery 

Glen Dale Owens Darlington, Pa. 

B.S. in B.A., Geneva College, 1942 
Beavef Valley Presbytery 

James Gladstone Patterson Walton, N. Y. 

B.S., Muskingum College, 1948 
Delaware Presbytery 

James Herbert Patterson ...... Chicago, III. 

A.B., Wheaton College, 1948 
Wheeling Presbytery 



66 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



Ross Wilson Porter Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1948 
Monongahela Presbytery 

Aaron Leigh Powers Des Moines, Iowa 

A.B., Drake University, 1948 
Des Moines Presbytery 

John Allen Shearer ........ Akron, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1948 
Cleveland Presbytery 

Donald Earl Steeb Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1948 
Monongahela Presbytery 

John Kaufman Stoner New Concord, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1948 
Muskingum Presbytery 

Louise Hannah Ward ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1947 
Pittsburgh Conference, The Methodist Church 

David Pollock White ....... Avalon, Pa. 

A.B., Bucknell University, 1948 
Allegheny Presbytery 

William Sherman Wilson Wichita, Kans. 

B.S., Sterling College, 1949 
Arkansas Valley Presbytery 



The Junior Class 

Garth Grayson Barber San Francisco, Calif. 

A.B., San Francisco State College, 1950 
San Francisco Presbytery 

David Edwin Bickett ........ Xenia, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1949 
Xenia Presbytery 

David Paul Birch ........ Struthers, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1949 
Cleveland Presbytery 

William Joseph Bomer ....... Des Moines, Iowa 

A.B., State University of Iowa, 1949 
Des Moines Presbytery 

Russell Owen Booher Portland, Oregon 

A.B., Lewis & Clark College, 1949 
Oregon Presbytery 

William Ross Byers Harrisville, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1949 
Butlef Presbytery 

William Robert Caldwell New Castle, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1949 
Beaver Valley Presbytery 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Thelological Seminary 



67 



George David Campbell Mars, Pa. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1949 
Butler Presbytery 

George Samuel Crooks Hammondsville, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1949 

Northeast Ohio Conference, Methodist Church 

Paul Richard Crooks Hammondsville, Ohio 

A.B., Asbury College, 1949 

Northeast Ohio Conference, Methodist Church 

Robert Charls Deal ........ Gary, Ind. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1949 
Chicago Presbytery 

Robert Lee Dickson Lexington, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1949 
Mansfield Presbytery 

Vernon Gibson Elgin ....... Elderton, Pa. 

B.S., Indiana State Teachers, 1949 
Connemaugh Presbytery 

Edwin Dallas Emmel . Meadville, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1949 
Lake Presbytery 

Donald William Ferguson ....... Erie, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1949 
Beaver Valley Presbytery 

Charles Jacob Gensheimer Floral Park, N. Y. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1949 
New York Presbytery 

Richard Paul Goodhart Youngstown, Ohio 

A.B., Westminster College, 1949 
Cleveland Presbytery 

Alvin Harry Grumbling ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Ashland College, 1949 

National Ministerial Association, Brethren Church 

Stanley Paul Hartung Mars, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1949 
Butler Presbytery 

Robert John Hinman . Teaneck, N. J. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1949 
Big Spring Presbytery 

Arthur Henry Johnstone ..... West Hempstead, N. Y. 
A.B., Muskingum College, 1949 
New York Presbytery 

Raymond Frank Jones, Jr Mt. Lebanon, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1947 
Monongahela Presbytery 

WiLLLAM DeShue Ng Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Senior, Taylor University 

Western Pa. District, Christian & Missionary Alliance 



68 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



Kenneth Edward Nolin Egypt 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1949 
Puget Sound Presbytery 

Frank Edward Patterson Nampa, Idaho 

A.B, Sterling College, 1949 
Idaho Presbytery 

William Talmage Peters, Jr Prairie, Alabama 

B.S., Knoxville College, 1947 
Tennessee Presbytery 

Clark William Plummer . . . . . . . Denver, Colo. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1949 
Colorado Presbytery 

Bernard Ernest Quick ....... Denver, Colo. 

B.M.E., University of Colorado, 1948 
Colorado Presbytery 

George R. Ross Library, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1934 
Pittsburgh Baptist Association 

Robert William Ross New Concord, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 19S0 
Cleveland Presbytery 

Chase Hutchinson Stafford ..... San Francisco, Calif. 
A.B., San Francisco State College, 1949 
San Francisco Presbytery 

John E. Stevens, Jr. . Sheakleyville, Pa. 

A.B., Butler University, 1949 
Indiana Presbytery 

Kenneth Linn Stewart ....... Washington, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1949 
Chartiers Presbytery 

John Andre Vandling ...... Emsworth, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1949 
Allegheny Presbytery 

Harry Breese Van Fleet Aurora, 111. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1949 
Chicago Presbytery 

James Edward Wadsworth, Jr. ..... Indianapolis, Ind. 

B.S., Butler University, 1949 
Indiana Presbytery 

Merle Gilbert Weaver Kossuth, Pa. 

B.B.A., Westminster College, 1949 
Erie Conference, Methodist Church 

Gerald Irvin Williamson Des Moines, Iowa 

A.B., Drake University, 1949 
Des Moines Presbytery 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 69 



Special Students 

Isabel Blair Ethiopia 

Elizabeth Watson Crozier ...... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Harlan Clayton Musser McKeesport, Pa. 

Harriette Sutherland Stafford . . . . . . Monessen, Pa. 

Samuel G. Stevens ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Inez Marie Sutton Egypt 



GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Robert Mason Barnes ........ Valencia, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1944 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1946 

Allegheny Presbytery 

Gordon Earl Boak Turtle Creek, Pa. 

B.S., Muskingum College, 1942 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1949 

Westmoreland Presbytery 

James Hiram Blackwood . ... . . . Mt. Lebanon, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1930 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1933 . 

Monongahela Presbytery 

Jay William Brewer ...... New Kensington, Pa. 

B.S., Sterling College, 1944 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1949 

Kiskiminetas Presbytery 

Elmer R. Carrithers ........ Mansfield, Ohio 

A.B., Ashland College, 1939 

Th.B., Ashland Theological Seminary, 1943 

Ohio State Conference, Brethren Church 

Ellsworth E. Caylor Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1943 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1945 

Monongahela Presbytery 

Kermit S. Edgar Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Geneva College, 1931 

Reformed Presbyterian Seminary, 1934 

Pittsburgh Presbytery, Reformed Presbyterian Church 

MiLFORD Franklin Henkel, Jr Carmel, N. Y. 

M.A., Boston University, 1948 

B.D., Winona Lake School of Theology, 1948 _ 

Conservative Baptist Association, North Baptist Convention 

Jessie R. Houk West Middlesex, Pa. 

A.B., Geneva College, 1930 

B.D., McCormick Theological Seminary, 1933 

Shenango Presbytery, Presbyterian Church 

Frederick Arland Huston ....... Etna, Pa. 

B.S., Kent State University, 1936 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1941 

Allegheny Presbytery 



70 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



Richard Karl Kennedy Vandergrift, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1941 

Th.B., PIttsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1944 

Kiskiminetas Presbytery 

Walter R. Kenyon Gibsonia, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1940 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1944 

Allegheny Presbytery 

Kenneth V. Kettlewell ....... Murrysville, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1945 

B.D., Pittsburgh-XenIa Theological Seminary, 1947 

Kiskiminetas Presbytery 

Ya'qub Khan Pakistan 

A.B., Gordon College, 1931 
Guiranwala Theological Seminary, 1940 
Pasrur Presbytery 

Frank Albert Lawrence ...... Mt. Lebanon, Pa. 

A.B., Wheaton College, 1934 
Westminster Seminary, 1937 
Monongahela Presbytery 

Donald G. Lester ......... Sharon, Pa. 

A.B., Brown University, 194S 
B.D, Yale Divinity School, 1948 
Mercer Presbytery 

Earl W. Lighthall WIndber, Pa. 

A.B., Syracuse University, 1936 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1948 

Pittsburgh Conference, The A^ethodlst Church 

Leland Merrill Miller Emsworth, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1920 

S.T.B., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1923 

Allegheny Presbytery 
Ralph Newell Ellwood City, Pa. 

A.B., Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1943 

B.D., Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1948 

Beaver Association, Northern Baptist Convention 

William Montgomery Nichol, Jr Braddock, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1926 

Th.B., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1929 

Westmoreland Presbytery 

J. Renwick Patterson ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Geneva College, 1931 

Reformed Presbyterian Theological Seminary, 1934 

Pittsburgh Presbytery, Reformed Presbyterian Church 
Edward C. Rowand Sharon, Pa. 

A.B., Fairmont State, 1939 

B.D., Yale Divinity School, 1942 

Disciple of Christ 
David J. Rowland West View, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1941 

Th.B., PIttsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1944 

Allegheny Presbytery 
Franklin K. Walker . . Meadville, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1941 

Th.B., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1944 

Lake Presbytery 







Q 
O 

h 
Z 

w 

Q 
D 

H 



I 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



71 



STUDENTS IN CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 



Juniors 



Minnie Marie Allison 

B.S. in Ed., Slippery Rocli State Teachers, 1945 
Beaver Valley Presbytery 

Lois Eileen Copeland ..... 
A.B., Muskingum College, 1949 
Monongahela Presbytery 

Martha Jean Hall ...... 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1949 
Muskingum Presbytery 

Phoebe Ann Madison ..... 
A.B., Tarkio College, 1949 
Keokuk Presbytery 

Ruth Sutherland Pulliam .... 
A.B., San Jose State College, 1949 

Laura Margaret Small ..... 
A.B., Geneva College, 1949 
Allegheny Presbytery 

Bettv Helen Zlody ..... 
B.S., Juniata College, 1949 
Beaver Valley Presbytery 



New Castle, Pa. 

Clinton, Pa. 

Cambridge, Ohio 

Burlington, Iowa 

Pakistan 
Warrendale, Pa. 

Ambridge, Pa. 



SUMMARY OF ATTENDANCE 



Undergraduate Department 

Juniors .... 

Middlers .... 

Seniors .... 

Special .... 

Total 

Graduate Department 
Department of Christian Education 

Total Enrollment 



38 

37 

17 

6 



24 

7 

129 



INSTITUTIONS REPRESENTED 

Asbury College, Kentucky ..... 

Ashland College, Ohio .... 

Boston University, Massachusetts 
Brown University, Rhode Island 
Bucknell University, Pennsylvania 
Butler University, Indiana ..... 

Dakota Wesleyan University, South Dakota 
Drake University, Iowa ..... 

Earlham College, Indiana ..... 

Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary 

Fairmont State University, West Virginia 

Geneva College, Pennsylvania .... 

Gordon College, India ..... 

Grove City College, Pennsylvania .... 

Indiana State Teachers ...... 

Juniata College, Pennsylvania .... 

Kent State University, Ohio .... 

Knoxville College, Tennessee .... 

Lewis & Clark College, Oregon .... 

Maryville College, Tennessee ..... 

Monmouth College, Illinois ..... 

Muskingum College, Ohio ..... 

San Francisco State College, California 

San Jose State Callege, California 

Seattle Pacific College, Washington 

Slippery Rock State Teachers, Pennsylvania 

State University of Iowa, Iowa .... 

Sterling College, Kansas ..... 

Syracuse University, New York .... 

Tarkio College, Missouri ..... 

Taylor University, Indiana ..... 

University of California . . ■ . 

University of Colorado ..... 

University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
West Liberty College, West Virginia 
Westminster College, Pennsylvania 
Wheaton College, Illinois .... 



Alabama 

California 

Colorado 

Egypt _ 

Ethiopia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Michigan 

Missouri 

New Jersey 

New York 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pakistan 

Pennsylvania 

South Dakota 

Sudan 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 



LOCALITIES REPRESENTED 



1 
1 
1 

7 

20 
2 



1 

12 

1 
2 
1 
1 
6 
1 

IS 
2 



CE 



90 


24 


7 


1 






3 






3 






3 






2 






1 






3 






3 






7 




1 


2 






1 






1 






1 






5 


1 




16 


1 


1 


2 








1 


1 


39 


21 


4 


1 






2 






1 






1 







98 24 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 73 

SPECIAL LECTURES, 1949-1950 

In the Pressly Chapel 

The Reverend Guy H. Black, D.D. 

"Visitation Evangelism" — four lectures 
Attorney Tim J. Campbell, LL.D. 

"If I Were a Minister" 
The Reverend Weldon Crossland, D.D. 

"Finance the Church" — four lectures 

Christian Stewardship, the Foundation of Sound Church Finance 
How to Prepare for the Annual Financial Loyalty Crusade 
How to Launch the Crusade and Maintain Financial Morale 
How to Create a Building or Endowment Fund 
Professor William G. Faddis 

"The Life of Christ in Art" 
Samuel A. Fulton, LL.D. 

"A Salesman's Advice to Ministers" 
The Reverend Robert W. Gibson, D.D. 

"The Pastor and Christian Higher Education" 
The Reverend Richard W. Graves, D.D. 

"Writing for the Church Papers" 
The Reverend A. E. Kelly, D.D. 

"The Denominational Program" 
The Reverend Thomas H. Newcomb, D.D. 

"The Deeper Meaning of the Lord's Supper" 
The Reverend John Orr, D.D. 

"On Being a Good Minister" 
The Reverend A. K. Stewart, D.D. 

"The Church and Community Responsibility" 
Major Frederick A. Whitfield, R.F.C. 

"Our Mission Work in India Since the Partition" 
Dr. Georges Florovsky 

"The Eastern Tradition in Christianity" 

In the First United Presbyterian Church, N. S. 

The Reverend Weldon Crossland, D.D. 

"A Planned Program for the Church Year" 

In the Seminary Building 
and the North Side Y. M. C. A. 

Recreation Workshop 

Leaders: — Mr. Howard Tanner — Mr. Bruce Tom — Miss Wilma Minteer 

In the North Presbyterian Church 

Helen A. Dickinson, Ph.D. 
"Beauty in Workshop" 

At the Webster Memorial Forum 

Dr. Clarence Edward Macartney 

"The Discipline of the Pastorate" 
Dr. Sherman Skinner 

"My Method of Sermon Preparation" 
Dr. Blanche Carrier 

"Psychology In the Pastorate" 
The Reverend Leland L. Miller 

"The Avocation of the Minister" 



HISTORICAL ROLL OF PROFESSORS 





Place of 


Period of 


Inauguration 


Service 


v^OHN Anderson Service 


1794-1819 


John Banks .... 






Philadelphia 


1820-1826 


James Ramsey 






Canonsburg 


1821-1842 


Joseph Kerr 






Pittsburgh 


1825-1829 


Mungo Dick 






Pittsburgh 


1829-1831 


John Taylor Pressly 






Allegheny 


1832-1870 


David Carson 






Canonsburg 


1834-1834 


Thomas Beveridge 






Canonsburg 


1835-1871 


Moses Kerr .... 






Allegheny 


1835-1836 


Joseph Claybaugh 






Oxford 


1839-1855 


Samuel W. McCracken 






Oxford 


1839-1840 


James Martin 






Canonsburg 


1842-1846 


James Lemonte Dinwiddie 






Allegheny 


1843-1846 


Abraham Anderson 






Canonsburg 


1847-1855 


Alexander Downs Clark 






Allegheny 


1847-1884 


David Reynolds Kerr . 






Allegheny 


1851-1887 


Samuel Wilson 






Xenia 


1855-1875 


William Davidson 






Oxford 


1855-1858 


Alexander Young . 






Oxford 


1855-1874 


John Scott .... 






Monmouth 


1858-1874 


Joseph Clokey 






Xenia 


1858-1873 


Andrew Morrow Black 






Monmouth 


1864-1874 


David Alexander Wallace 






Monmouth 


1867-1870 


David Alexander Wallace 






Xenia 


1883-1883 


Joseph Tate Cooper 






Allegheny 


1871-1886 


William Bruce 






Xenia 


1871-1880 


James Gillespie Carson 






Xenia 


1873-1888 


l^ILLIAM GaLLOGLY MoOREIKEAD 






Xenia 


1873-1914 


[ackson Burgess McMichael 






Xenia 


1873-1878 


Alexander Young . 






Allegheny 


1876-1891 


i' James Harper 
David MacDill 






Xenia 


1879-1899 






Xenia 


1884-1902 


David A. McClenahan 






Allegheny 


1885-1921 


James Alexander Grier 






Allegheny 


1886-1909 


John McNaugher 






Allegheny 


1886-1943 


Wilbert Webster White 






Xenia 


1889-1894 


Oliver Joseph Thatcher 






Allegheny 


1888-1892 


John A. Wilson . 






Allegheny 


1893-1915 


John Douds Irons . 






Xenia 


1895-1905 


Joseph Kyle 






Xenia 


1899-1921 


Jesse Johnson 






Xenia 


1903-1930 


John Elliott Wishart . 






Xenia 


1905-1923 


William Riley Wilson . 






Allegheny 


1907-1940 


Charles Frederick Wishart 






Allegheny 


1907-1914 


John Hunter Webster . 






Xenia 


1908-1933 


Melvin Grove Kyle 






Xenia 


1914-1930 


James Doig Rankin 






Pittsburgh 


1914-1929 


David Frazier McGill . 






Pittsburgh 


1915-1931 


James Gallaway Hunt 






Pittsburgh 


1920-1926 


James Harper Grier 






Pittsburgh 


1922-1926 


WROBERT McNaRY KaRR . 






St. Louis 


1922-1949 


James Leon Kelso 






St. Louis 


1923- 


George Boone McCreary 






St. Louis 


1924-1946 


Robert Nathaniel Montgomery 






Pittsburgh 


1926-1930 


Albert Henry Baldinger 






Pittsburgh 


1931-1947 


Clarence Joseph Williamson 






Pittsburgh 


1932- 


George Anderson Long 






Pittsburgh 


1942- 


Theophilus Mills Taylor . 






Pittsburgh 


1942- 


^Addison Hardie Leitch 






Pittsburgh 


1946-. 


H. Ray Shear 






Pittsburgh 


1947- 


Florence M. Lewis 






Pittsburgh 


1947- 


Gordon Edmund Jackson 






Pittsburgh 


1949- 


John H. Gerstner, Jr. 






Pittsburgh 


1950- 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 75 



DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS 

The provision of modern theological education without charge 
to students requires an extensive outlay on the part of the Semi- 
nary. The maintenance of the Seminary building and equipment 
is but one item in the annual draft upon the treasury. At the 
present time the income from endowment is quite insufficient to 
meet current expenses. 

The claims of the Seminary are, therefore, submitted to the 
consideration of all who wish to honor the Lord with their sub- 
stance. Congregations, as well as individuals, are asked to give 
their help to the institution. Appeal is also made to all who pur- 
pose making bequests to remember the Seminary, for the training 
of the ministry is the primary educational task of the Church. 

All bequests should be drawn as follows: 
For Personal Property 

I hereby give and bequeath to The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theo- 
logical Seminary of the United Presbyterian Church of North 

America, the sum of dollars to 

constitute a part of the permanent funds of the institution. 

For Real Estate 

I hereby give and devise to The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological 
Seminary of the United Presbyterian Church of North America, 
its successors and assigns, forever, all that lot or piece of ground 
(carefully describing the property), the same to hold or dispose 
of for the benefit of the permanent funds of the institution. 

Bequests may also be made for special funds, scholarships, or 
lectures. 

Care should be taken to use the corporate name as given 
above, and to have the bequest conform to the laws of the State 
governing it. 



76 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



CORRESPONDENCE 

In general, correspondence should be addressed to the Pres- 
ident of the Faculty, the Rev. George A. Long, D.D., 616 West 

North Avenue, Pittsburgh 12, Pa. 

Letters relating to the endowment and funds should be ad- 
dressed to Miss Mildred E. Cowan, Treasurer, using the Seminary 
address given above. 

All letters concerning registration and admission to the Sem- 
inary should be sent to the Registrar's Office. Likewise, all re- 
quests for transcripts of record should be addressed to the Regis- 
trar in properly written form, — giving the full name of the appli- 
cant, his present address, the place and period of attendance, and 
the name and address of the institution and official to whom the 
transcript is to be sent. The request should be accompanied by 
the usual fee of one dollar ($1.00), unless the transcript is the ap- 
plicant's first, or is to be used in connection with an application 
for a Chaplaincy in the Armed Forces of the United States. 



The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



77 



INDEX 



Academic Regulations . . . . . . • 15,39,44 

Accreditation of the Seminary ..... 6 

Admission, Terms of ...... • 15,39,44 

Alumni Association ........ 60 

Attendance, Summary of ...... . 71-72 

Awards Granted, 1948-1949 61 

Bible Lands Museum ....... 52 

Board of Advisors, Dept. of Christian Education . . 9 

Board of Directors ........ 7 

Board of Trustees ........ 9 

Calendar for 1950-1951 4 

Calendar of the Seminary ....... 5 

Chapel Preaching ........ 37 

Christian Education, Department of ... . 43-50 

Classification of Students ....... 16,44 

Control and Management of the Seminary ... 6 

Correspondence ........ 76 

Courses of Instruction, Undergraduate Department . . 23-38 

Courses Available to Graduate Students .... 22,39 

Courses of Instruction, Department of Christian Education 47-50 

Credentials Required for Admission .... 15,39,44 

Cultural Advantages of the Seminary .... 53 

Curriculum in Outline, Undergraduate Department . . 21 

Curriculum in Outline, Department of Christian Education 46 

Degrees Granted, 1948-1949 61 

Degree of Bachelor of Divinity ...... 18 

Degree of Master of Theology 39 

Degree of Master of Religious Education .... 45 

Denominational Seminary, Advantages of ... . 53 

Dining Club ......... 58 

Donations and Bequests ....... 75 

Dormitory, Women's Committee ..... 9 

Elective Courses 22 

Emeritus Professors ........ 10 

Examinations . . 18 

Facilities for Study 51 

Faculty 10 

Fees and Other Expenses 40,45,58,59 

Field Work 37,44 

Graduate Studies, Department of 39-41 

Graduation, Requirements and Awards ..... 18,39,45 

Historical Roll of Professors 74 

Honors, Cum Laude Series 18 

Institutions and Localities Represented .... 72 

Insurance for Students ....... 56 

Library and Reading Room 51 

Life at the Seminary 55 



78 The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 



Location of the Seminary Building 55 

Musical Opportunity 57 

Observatory, The Allegheny 54 

Physical Culture 58 

Planetarium, The Buhl Foundation ^4 

Pre-Seminary Studies . 13 

Pre-Theological Major . 14 

Prizes Awarded, 1949 62 

Purpose of the Seminary ....... 12 

Register of Students, 1949-1950 63-70 

Registration . 15,17 

Religious Life at the Seminary 56 

Rooms and Accommodations 55-56 

Schedule, The Norm and Modifications .... 17 

Scholarships, Competitive . 19 

Self-support and Student Aid 59 

Social Life at the Seminary ...... 57 

Special Lectures, 1949-1950 73 

Student Association 60 

Students, Register of, 1949-1950 . . . . . 63-70 

Summer Institutes 41 

Term and Course, Prescribed by General Assembly . . 12 

Undergraduate Department . . . . . . ^ 12-38 

University of Pittsburgh, Affiliation with .... 42 

Webster Memorial Forum 57 

Women's Dormitory Committee 9 

Y. M. C. A., Allegheny Branch 58 



1 7764 



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